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rayban

Neglected Films With Gay Favorites

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On ‎11‎/‎2‎/‎2017 at 11:45 AM, rayban said:

Stewart and Ayres are a skating duo in "Ice Follies of 1939" -

HALL & BURGESS

notice the proximity -

T0bd95f8ce2f7344330a77b4a60409c93--lew-jo

I can't believe you came up with this still. Stewart looks bemused, but Ayers looks like he's ready to kill somebody.

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1 hour ago, DougieB said:

I can't believe you came up with this still. Stewart looks bemused, but Ayers looks like he's ready to kill somebody.

There is just so much skating footage in this film.

It's a one-of-a-kind movie experience.

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"A Child Is Waiting" - John Cassavetes - 1963

Burt Lancaster, Judy Garland and little Bruce Ritchey in a fantastic film about mentally challenged children - it is a genuine triumph for everybody - the director, the scenarist and the actors - and the children, who will break your heart.

391d003a21a82e5e236ed1bdf9d6321c--judy-g

(There are two versions of this film - the producer's (Stanley Kramer) and the director's (John Cassavetes).

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On ‎11‎/‎6‎/‎2017 at 10:54 PM, rayban said:

 

(There are two versions of this film - the producer's (Stanley Kramer) and the director's (John Cassavetes).

I never realized that. Do you happen to know which version TCM has shown? 

I love Judy in this too. She used the same kind of quiet underplaying which she used in The Clock and in both cases she was immensely appealing.

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6 hours ago, DougieB said:

I never realized that. Do you happen to know which version TCM has shown? 

I love Judy in this too. She used the same kind of quiet underplaying which she used in The Clock and in both cases she was immensely appealing.

TCM showed the Stanley Kramer version.

From what I've read, the John Cassavetes version was more "daring" - asking us to accept mentally challenged children as just different human beings.

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On 11/6/2017 at 9:14 AM, DougieB said:

I can't believe you came up with this still. Stewart looks bemused, but Ayers looks like he's ready to kill somebody.

I really need to see this it looks like a camp classic

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12 hours ago, jaragon said:

I really need to see this it looks like a camp classic

There's a number by Shipstad and Johnson, who created the Ice Follies, in which one of them is in drag. It's kind of dowdy drag, but he looks like he's a little too comfortable doing it. I wonder.

In Mommie Dearest this is the film which she's preparing for at the beginning. We see Joan/Faye brewing coffee, doing her ice facial, etc, but all from behind. The first we see her face is when she stands up after lacing her skates, then turns to the camera with that high-voltage smile: "Let's do it!"

It's hilarious that the big spare-no-expense Technicolor finale has zero skating by Joan. She's led onto the ice on some kind of carpet and just sits there on her throne while everyone skates around her. Way to throw yourself into a role, Joan.

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9 minutes ago, DougieB said:

There's a number by Shipstad and Johnson, who created the Ice Follies, in which one of them is in drag. It's kind of dowdy drag, but he looks like he's a little too comfortable doing it. I wonder.

In Mommie Dearest this is the film which she's preparing for at the beginning. We see Joan/Faye brewing coffee, doing her ice facial, etc, but all from behind. The first we see her face is when she stands up after lacing her skates, then turns to the camera with that high-voltage smile: "Let's do it!"

It's hilarious that the big spare-no-expense Technicolor finale has zero skating by Joan. She's led onto the ice on some kind of carpet and just sits there on her throne while everyone skates around her. Way to throw yourself into a role, Joan.

That number by Shipstad and Johnson is memorabe - the one guy is drag looks like he's having a lot of fun.

That spare-no-expense Technicolor finale is memorable, too - and Joan Crawford is playing Cinderella, too - she enters the scene in Adrian-like splendor and then everybody celebrates her - on skates.

But, then, there are cuts to her while she's watching the film at a premiere - and she's saying that, the next time, she will skate.
 

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I don't know anything about Shipstad and Johnson, so I hope I'm not "defaming" anyone, but if you were skaters and you were gay and you were partners, skating together would be a dream-come-true and the only way you could do it, I suppose, would be for one of the guys to do drag. It's too bad that the times demanded it, because there's something so thrilling about seeing two men (or two women) partnering each other. Even in this much more permissive era, it's still a rarity.

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"Gentleman Marry Brunettes" - Richard Sale -1955

This film stars Jane Russell, Jeanne Crain, Alan Young and Scott Brady -

it seems to be a take-off on "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" -

not a sequel, in any way -

and Jane Russell is playing dumb and Jeanne Crain is playing wise -

Brady is a talent agent without any real dough -

Young has any number of jobs, but is secretly very wealthy -

the plot, if you want to call it that, is about the girls' refusal to perform naked in clubs in Paris -

and every man seems to want them -

the movie is so bad that it is actually entertaining -

the nadir of the movie is the final production number in which Alan Young is an endangered ape who is hiding in a tree and singing "Ain't Misbehavin'" and then the camera sweeps down on some murderous savages who seek out Jane Russell and Jeanne Crain as birds of paradise who are also singing "Ain't Misbehavin''' and then get cooked in a large boiling pot -

but never fear, they escape to the rapturous applause of the nightclub audience -

the sort of movie that you really can't believe is happening - right there in front of your eyes -

scott-brady-jane-russell-rudy-vallee-jea

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There's a brief appearance by Gwen Verdon as a speakeasy dancer in one of the numbers. She may also have been in the "Ain't Misbehavin'" number you referenced, but the dancers were all in blackface so it's hard to tell. I always look for George Chakiris in dance numbers from around that time too, but he doesn't seem to have been hired for this particular movie.

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Have you noticed George Chakiris in a small role in "Meet Me In Las Vegas"?

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42 minutes ago, rayban said:

Have you noticed George Chakiris in a small role in "Meet Me In Las Vegas"?

I think he actually got a screen credit for that one. So much of his work was uncredited. It's amazing to think that he was easily recognizable in one of the most iconic musical numbers of all time, "Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend", with one of the most iconic actresses ever, but never got credit. But I guess in a way it gives him more prestige than any mere screen credit would have. 

Did you catch Jane Russell's sly dig at the Production Code in "Gentlemen Marry Brunettes"? When they show her one of the scanty costumes she says "The Breen Office would never approve." The year before they'd given her holy hell for a costume she'd worn in "The French Line". (which featured an uncredited appearance by Kim Novak as a showgirl in one of the numbers, to bring this full circle)

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He got a screen credit in "Meet Me In Las Vegas" under a similar name.

I did catch that remark.

I saved "Gentlemen Marry Brunettes"

Somehow, I couldn't get rid of it.

I loved Scott Brady singing "I Got Five Dollars".

I find him extremely "hot".

 


 

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"Harry and Son" - directed by and starring Paul Newman - and co-starring Robby Benson - 1984

somehow, this superb film has fallen through the cracks -

it's about some very ordinary people who are just trying to get through life -

one day at a time -

nothing extraordinary, in terms of subject matter -

but it is so quietly and sensitively observed -

Mr. Newman and Mr. Benson are enchanced by a first-rate supporting cast -

including Ellen Barkin as the pregnant girl (she doesn't know who the father might be) whom Mr. Benson decides to marry -

films this fine - and this quiet - films that do not say, "Look at me!", are often overlooked and neglected - 

 Blu-ray_Review_High-Def_Digest_Harry_Son

 

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5 hours ago, jaragon said:

Doug Savant is so hot in that movie....:wub:

 

A major disappointment with the film is that Doug Savant is obviously into Rob Lowe, but he is not allowed to fully express that "wayward emotion", not even at the film's end.

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