JakeHolman

Martin Scorsese: 'Cinema is gone'

39 posts in this topic

Well, even the movie going "experience" has changed so much it's clear it's not(to me) as enjoyable as it used to be....

 

Like your observations there Sepia.

Our film group does the "big hush" thing, never noticed it until you mentioned it. It IS a sign of people "into" movies.

 

But I do believe our current society's inability to respect others is a huge part of the failure of the theatergoing experience. Too many in the audience think they're in their own living room.

Hearing an occasional whisper between people discussing "what did she just say?" or "I don't understand..." doesn't bother me. But loud discussion or someone looking up something on their phone, light glaring on their face DOES bother me. 

I've heard people ANSWER a call and hold up their phones to RECORD sections of the movie! Whaa?

 

Luckily, there's theaters that still show classic movies and for the most part the audience is interested & respectful. But current movies attract the general public, not real movie fans. And it shows in their behaviour.

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Well TIKI, you're fortunate to live in an area where there's opportunities like that.  Any theaters around here that show "classic" films are far and few between.  The closest to ME being the recently( well 20 or so years ago) FOX THEATER in downtown Detroit.  But it's also used as a "multi-purpose" venue, also having events like the RADIO CITY ROCKETTES every Christmas season, THE NUTCRACKER, and one year they had THE LORD OF THE DANCE.

 

My wife and I( when she was better and before her health and mobility troubles)  Did go there for "special" presentations of BEN HUR (for it's 30th anniversary and with her sister who died a short year later), THE WIZARD OF OZ, GONE WITH THE WIND and CITIZEN KANE and CASABLANCA. 

 

Sure, then at those times the familiar "hush" was present.  But in today's multiplexes?  Forget it.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Marty is a little late since Jean-Luc Godard said cinema was over quite a while ago.
 

www.theguardian.com/film/2011/jul/12/jean-luc-godard-film-socialisme

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The girls at the concession stand allowed us to eat all the popcorn

we wanted, as long as we were discreet about it. But the candy we

had to pay for. I remember they'd go to their locked storage room 

and get out a big plastic bag of popcorn. It still tasted pretty good

and I ate all I could and I still like popcorn today. I sneak in a big

candy bar, but that's all. I guess one could have a flask filled with

soda, but that seems a bit of a chore. I'm not that desperate. 

Yuch

When I was a kid, no self-respecting theaters in our area were selling pre-popped popcorn.

Enjoying freshly popped popcorn was part of the whole experience of going to the movies. Just the smell of the popcorn at the concession stand got you into the mood.

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Cinema, you might have to figure some of us "geezers" grew up going to the show when EVERY movie practically was fine cinema.  By the time I was old enough to be in that "key" demographic you mention, I had already seen at the show, in weekend matinees, movies like "The Birdman Of Alcatraz",  "Pressure Point",  "Raisin In The Sun",  "Lillies Of The Field",  "Seven Days In May",  "Rio Bravo",  "The Manchurian Candidate",  and a host of others that were wonderful movies, but at the time were also considered "par for the course". 

 

These days it DOES seem that "the bigger the hype, the bigger the draw" when it comes to movie releases.  There ARE gems out there.  You just have to have the time and patience to dig them out.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

Ok, now that's just over the top. lol

 

Zombies on Broadway  (1945)

 

Dracula vs Frankenstein (1971)

 

The Crawling Eye (1958)

 

King Kong vs Godzilla  (1962)

 

Attack of the Giant Leeches  (1959)

 

The Manster  (1959)

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Yuch

When I was a kid, no self-respecting theaters in our area were selling pre-popped popcorn.

Enjoying freshly popped popcorn was part of the whole experience of going to the movies. Just the smell of the popcorn at the concession stand got you into the mood.

This stuff wasn't really that bad, and it was free, though not as good as

fresh popped. And this was a very self-respecting theater in a fairly

affluent town. 

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Could someone on the Starship Enterprise please reboot the Universal Translator?



KARLOFF, ever see 1994's "Ed Mood" or better yet for you "Gods & Monsters" (l998)


Don't know you & it's not among my fav. genres, but I can always give you pointers of dates, travis & others stuff if you need it

(P.S. I've slaw
long been arguing with the 2 main educutated wanted a lot more different yet credible stuff thrown it-(remember "The Killer Shrews" (l959) kinda' bad but scares me-(something that can actually scare me anymore!), rely getthings toger, p[lease & let me now how the previous tayo desings are-(HA, YOU WANTED TO DOI IT BUDDY BOY)

But a reality check for those scarred or pretty big stars, wolds, the worlds the I not your movie

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This stuff wasn't really that bad, and it was free, though not as good as
fresh popped. And this was a very self-respecting theater in a fairly
affluent town.

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More Scorsese trivia: I own a book on him for yrs now, actually 2-(gifts)

& though his tastes change quite quickly at last count-(& he's not several favorite files, like Ebert always did)

Only a few yrs ago-(around 2012) he shared his top favorite pictures, again:-(In no special order except 1 & 2)>
Vertigo-(& the yr it upset Kane after 50yrs as the greatest ever made in sight & Sound Survey for 2012, up see
The Searchers-(his fav. since childhood, check out Mean Streets)
Kane
Duel in the Sun
The Heiress
The Red Shoes
40 Guns
The Leopard
Fellini's 8 & 1/2
Giant
Abbott & Costello Go to Mars-(I'm serious)
On the Waterfront-(says it was first time he saw folks like his neighborhood)

His idols are John Cassavettes & Michael Powell

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Internet services like Youtube offer a similar communal viewing experience that Scorsese laments is gone from traditional moviegoing.  On Youtube, you can watch videos, post comments, and see other viewers' comments, befriend others, etc,  As long as people's desire to watch moving images on a screen remains constant, there will always be communal experiences in one form or another.

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Internet services like Youtube offer a similar communal viewing experience that Scorsese laments is gone from traditional moviegoing.  On Youtube, you can watch videos, post comments, and see other viewers' comments, befriend others, etc,  As long as people's desire to watch moving images on a screen remains constant, there will always be communal experiences in one form or another.

 

It's really not quite the same. Watching a film with a live audience in a cinema is more akin to watching a gladiator spectacle in the Colisseum. There's something primal about it. Probably in our genes--going all the way back to packs of early human ancestors in tribal gatherings in religious ceremonies or hunting and then harvesting prey. The Youtube audience doesn't move you as a viewer the same way that hearing people in the cinema audience gasp or laugh does. You can feel the tension in the air in the cinema.

 

But I don't really lament the loss of the cinema experience. Haven't been back in years (Alice in Wonderland 2010 may be the last one I saw in the theater).

 

We have a lot of things that help make up for the loss. I've learned a lot just from this messageboard in the past 3 days that I personally would not have learned through the old means of communication. And there's all those old films and tv that we can now fairly easily see at any time we want (if we can afford it) that in the old days you could only see during their initial release, the rare re-release, or on tv.

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It's really not quite the same. Watching a film with a live audience in a cinema is more akin to watching a gladiator spectacle in the Colisseum. There's something primal about it. Probably in our genes--going all the way back to packs of early human ancestors in tribal gatherings in religious ceremonies or hunting and then harvesting prey. The Youtube audience doesn't move you as a viewer the same way that hearing people in the cinema audience gasp or laugh does. You can feel the tension in the air in the cinema.

 

I would say online reactions can be just as passionate and intense as those given by live people.  I would even say that with the relative privacy and anonymity offered by the Internet, people tend to give even more passionate responses online than off.

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I would say online reactions can be just as passionate and intense as those given by live people.

 

Uh no, I just cannot agree.

 

Last night I sat with a group of 80 people in a small room watching two B mysteries - a Whistler and a Mr Moto.

 

No "internet experience" compares to the audience hush as the movie starts, the gasps, the laughter, even the silence in the tense parts. Half the fun of watching movies, is watching them TOGETHER, it very much elevates what would be a so-so or even boring movie watched at home on a computer.

 

During the intermission, everyone was smiling, talking about the first movie. It's a communal, shared experience. Many linger at the end of the night to discuss their opinions. It's just fun really being together, interacting with real people.

 

I feel very sorry for generations of people growing up not realizing what social skills & joys are lost because of the "instant" and "singular, self-centered" world of the internet offerings.

Borrowing from Truman Capote: "That's not discussing, that's typing!"

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