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-French Films Thread-

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aaagh. I can't stand that I am stuck here in a burg that has no foreign film theatre..... it is awful. One theatre occasionally gets things that are most popular, like La Vie en Rose, but then I can't find anyone to go with me..... bummer. :(

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> {quote:title=JackFavell wrote:}{quote}

> aaagh. I can't stand that I am stuck here in a burg that has no foreign film theatre..... it is awful. One theatre occasionally gets things that are most popular, like La Vie en Rose, but then I can't find anyone to go with me..... bummer. :(

 

Got Netflix? It's the next best thing, I mean, I assume you live in the U.S.?

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Yes, I would die without TCM and Netflix!

 

I am actually so impressed with Netflix right now. I had a dvd that I sent back almost 2 weeks ago and it never arrived.... I called today and they were so nice, told me not to worry about it, and my next movie would be on the way... Then they sent two e-mails, one to ask me how the customer service was, and the other to tell me that if they find the movie, they will notify me. I can't remember if I've ever had such a pleasant experience reporting a problem.....

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Jack,

 

You obviously have cable, since you get TCM.

Have you ever checked to see whether TV5-Monde is available to you?

 

Cablevision finally began offering it here, and it is just great.

I watch it almost as much as I do TCM.

 

Not all of the programs are subtitled, but the films are.

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I do remember reading a newspaper story about Netflix bringing back their telephone customer service center back to the U.S. because they thought the service would be better and friendlier.

 

And back to the thread topic - anyone catch the re-issued DVD of *Joy House* ( *Les Felines* )

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A couple of years ago my "expanded" cable package carried The International Channel that featured two hours of French programming from TV5-Monde every Saturday, a movie and then if there was time, continued programming with interviews etc., in French with subtitles. One movie a week but many were quite good. I still have some VHS copies. There would be no interruptions for about 45 minutes then very few after that. Then The International Channel moved to digital cable, which I have, but the channel is totally different and no TV5-monde. I really miss it. The movies were normally not that well-known and probably would never show up on Encore or the like. But they were quite good for the most part. I really miss that channel.

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I had been pestering Cablevision about TV5-Monde for quite a while. They seemed to have no idea what it was. I knew about it because the channel is one of the sponsors of the annual Rendezvous with French cinema at Lincoln Center's Walter Reade Theater.

 

Every now and then, Cablevision would send around a glossy little flyer with a list of all their international stations, but Cablevision was never there.

 

Then one night I went online and browsed through the list, and voil?! there it was! I called Cablevision and ordered it, and it was on chez moi less than five minutes later.

 

Unfortunately, Cablevision's service is not so great, and they do very poorly with TV-5. It is constantly breaking up into pixels, or freezing, or disappearing, and when I call them, they always want to send out a technician - even though the problem is not at this end.

 

But TV5-Monde has excellent shows, round the clock. All sorts of documentaries, news and weather, kids' shows, tv shows, music, live theater, and lots of movies and shorts. At least one film every night, often more. (As a rule, only the feature films are subtitled, although at least one Canadian sitcom has subtitles - in French, because the Canadian French can be hard to follow for those who are not used to it.) And no commercials!!

 

Several different francophone stations contribute to the programming: from France, Africa, Canada, Belgium, Switzerland. TV5 has the only news programs that I am willing to watch. (I gave up on U.S. television news years ago.)

 

You can see their schedule at [tv5.org] . And, as cable companies do change their offerings, keep an eye on yours, and let them know that you really want this channel. It can't hurt.

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DirecTV did not in the past.

 

When I considered switching from Cablevision to satellite tv, it was to DishTV, precisely because they offered TV5-Monde.

 

The Dish people came out twice to try and set it up, but the big oak tree in front of my house was blocking their international satellite. I wasn't about to cut it down, so I went without for several years. Then Cablevision picked up TV5.

 

So, if you can switch to Dish, you might be able to have TV5. Otherwise, I would just keep requesting it from DirecTV. What with Verizon's FiOS spreading, and an increasing demand for an end to cable monopolies, the cable and satellite people might be getting a little more responsive to customer requests.

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I didn't realize it was already out on DVD. I might be able to go rent from Blockbuster, I haven't for a while but I think I still have a card somewhere.

 

I just realized that I have been misspelling Audrey Tautou 's name all day... I hate when I do that. I always pride myself on getting these things right. Pardon.....

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> {quote:title=JackFavell wrote:}{quote}

> I didn't realize it was already out on DVD. I might be able to go rent from Blockbuster, I haven't for a while but I think I still have a card somewhere.

>

 

Have you had a chance to watch it yet?

 

Anyhow, I'm a big fan of Ludivine Sagnier and was delighted to read a feature about her in the L.A. Times website. Enjoy!

 

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/news/la-et-ludivine5-2008sep05,0,5229330.story

 

*French actress Ludivine Sagnier's looks can kill*

Whether playing temptress or naif, she can capture the wounded heart of a woman with just a glance.

By Graham Fuller, Special to The Times

September 5, 2008

One silent look from the French actress Ludivine Sagnier can tilt a cinematic world on its axis.

 

In Claude Chabrol's "A Girl Cut in Two," in theaters today, Sagnier plays Gabrielle, a TV weather girl in love with a married novelist (Fran?ois Berl?and). As a birthday treat, this jaded Lothario, twice her age, ushers her upstairs at his gentleman's club, where she's to pleasure his friends. Vaguely aware of his plan, and self-destructively complicit, Gabrielle downs her drink as realization dawns on her face. Chabrol makes the point that she's an angel in a cave of devils.

 

That look is the queasy center of a film that uses the manipulation of a young woman to launch a sardonic attack on the decadence of the literary intelligentsia, the superficiality of the television world and the self-entitlement of the bourgeoisie. The latter is represented by an unstable scion (Beno?t Magimel) of New Money. His relentless pursuit of Gabrielle ends in a tragedy inspired by the 1906 Stanford White murder case.

 

Sagnier, 29, has a 3-year-old daughter with actor-model Nicolas Duvauchelle, and they're expecting another child in December. She says motherhood won't interrupt her work, which has embraced diverse roles in such films as "8 Women," "La Petite Lili" and "Peter Pan." American moviegoers probably know her best from 2003's mystery thriller "Swimming Pool," which also starred Charlotte Rampling. Sagnier's image -- bronzed, bikini-clad, promiscuous -- earned her a reputation as a screen temptress, despite the fact that her reckless character crumbles in the wake of a killing.

 

Asked if that film changed her life, Sagnier laughs. "First, I lost weight for it . . . no, I'm kidding," she says. "It had an impact on my career more than my life. It got recognition internationally, so it allowed me to reach a lot of people, which was positive. But it was a test for me to play this sexy, confident girl, because it's not who I usually am. I don't have a sex symbol image in France, because people there don't dwell on nudity -- they just like or dislike the character."

 

Sagnier is fully clothed in the club scene for "Girl Cut in Two," but naked emotionally -- another test, "because I'm full of imagination," she says. "I guessed that the most horrible thing was going to happen. It was as difficult as being naked on screen. You don't see what happens, but you feel the perverse atmosphere.

 

"This is a trick of Chabrol's. He wants the audience to project whatever it wants on the scene, because he says that nothing is dirtier than the eye of the observer. He pushes this naive and ambitious girl to cross boundaries that aren't easy to cross. That's where we see how innocent and devoted she is -- I think that's moving."

 

Sagnier gives another unforgettable "look" in Claude Miller's "A Secret," a true-life drama set in Nazi-occupied France, that opens Sept. 12. She plays Hannah, a young Jewish mother, whose husband lusts after her sister-in-law. Hannah is sitting poolside when she sees him gazing at the woman, a beautiful swimming champion. She immediately comprehends the situation, but Sagnier's expression only faintly registers shock. She saves her revenge for later.

 

"My concern was not feeling empathy for Hannah," Sagnier says. "Because if I couldn't, it wouldn't have been realistic. I had to keep my heart tough. But one thing I like about the movie is that it's too complex to say who is guilty and who's a victim."

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I see that your article mentions Claude Miller's new film. Un Secret.

 

I saw it in March, and it is wonderful. See it if you can.

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Very interesting article, FF.

 

I haven't watched "Balloon" yet, but there is hope! It's coming to Netflix in October. I am more likely to get it there than to travel to Blockbuster, so I am going to try and be the first person to rent it.

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Sounds cool J.

 

I just watched Jean-Pierre Melville's *Dirty Money (Un Flic)* which was recently released on DVD; it stars Alain Delon, Catherine Deneuve and Richard Crenna. I won't go into all the details here as I've already posted about it in the Noir/Gangster forum, but I recommend it if you haven't seen it!

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Haven't seen the Juliette Binoche one yet, but will look for it! This 34 minute original is a little jewel of a film, a nice surprise!

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The Juliette Binoche one is a good, meditative film. You should enjoy it if you like contemplative movies. I don't know what the situation is like in Canada, here in the U.S. it is still a Blockbuster exclusive, apparently, but should become more widely available eventually.

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Someone at the library likes foreign film so it'll turn up there eventually. Meditative is good sometimes. Funny thing though, just after watching THE RED BALLOON, I watched a tribute to Paul Newman in a similar scene with balloons on David Letterman- nice coincidence, speaking of meditative.

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Now that *OSS 117: Cairo, Nest of Spies* is available on DVD in North America, hopefully it will gain a lot more fans. The movie is basically a spoof of 50's and 60's spy flicks, very tongue-in-cheek and with a leading man who happens to look a lot like Sean Connery did back when he was 007.

 

However to call *OSS 117* a Bond spoof might be somewhat incorrect, since the character actually predates the creation of James Bond by a few years, from what I've read. He was already wildly popular before "Casino Royale" had even been written. But it is only with this latest film version that he has been taken on a clearly satirical direction.

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I caught up with *Pepe Le Moko* over the weekend - what a great movie. It's gritty, and funny, and very moving, and of course Jean Gabin is absolutely marvelous. It's the kind of performance you don't easily forget. The African locations seemed absolutely convincing. Great French movie!

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