Sign in to follow this  
tibor_bardot

-French Films Thread-

112 posts in this topic

I tend to like Italian films more than French films, but some French films that come to mind right off that I enjoyed are:

 

Police Python 357 (1976) - Yves Montand, Stefania Sandrelli

Shoot the Piano Player (1960)

Priceless (2006) - Audrey Tautou

Tell No One (2006) -

Le Secret (1974) - Jean-Louis Trintignant, Marlene Jobert

Dernier domicile connu (1970) - Lino Ventura, Marlene Jobert

 

As for Catherine Spaak French films:

I think that Les puits aux trois verites (1961), Weekend at Dunkirk (1964), and Un meurtre est un meurtre (1972) are OK.

 

Perhaps my least favorite French film is La ronde (1964).

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two French films I remember viewing years ago in the when they came out in the U.S. were "Jean de Florette" and it's sequel "Manon des Sources".  Both well made and very emotional movies I need to see again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Viewed the delightful AMELIE (2001) on Amazon today.  A marvelous French movie subtitled in English.  A film of the search for love.  Top notch movie starring the beautiful Audrey Tautou.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two French films I remember viewing years ago in the when they came out in the U.S. were "Jean de Florette" and it's sequel "Manon des Sources".  Both well made and very emotional movies I need to see again.

 

You might also try (if you haven't already) La Gloire de Mon Pere (My Father's Glory) and Le Chateau de Ma Mere (My Mother's Castle). These two pairs of movies have a common element. The ones you mentioned are based on novels by Marcel Pagnol (1895-1974).  The ones I mentioned are based on Marcel Pagnol's two childhood memoirs. All four movies were made after his death. Jean and Manon need to be seen in that order because the story arc comprises both movies. Gloire and Chateau should be seen in that order to preserve chronology. Both memoirs are thoroughly delightful but not without poignantly touching moments. The final sequences of Chateau are extraordinary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You might also try (if you haven't already) La Gloire de Mon Pere (My Father's Glory) and Le Chateau de Ma Mere (My Mother's Castle). These two pairs of movies have a common element. The ones you mentioned are based on novels by Marcel Pagnol (1895-1974).  The ones I mentioned are based on Marcel Pagnol's two childhood memoirs. All four movies were made after his death. Jean and Manon need to be seen in that order because the story arc comprises both movies. Gloire and Chateau should be seen in that order to preserve chronology. Both memoirs are thoroughly delightful but not without poignantly touching moments. The final sequences of Chateau are extraordinary.

Thanks for the suggestions.  I have located both you mentioned on Amazon Movies that I can rent via the internet and watch on my TV.  Both are now on my "to watch" list.  Maybe tomorrow.  I greatly appreciate the information on these movies.  I can't remember ever viewing them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You might also try (if you haven't already) La Gloire de Mon Pere (My Father's Glory) and Le Chateau de Ma Mere (My Mother's Castle). These two pairs of movies have a common element. The ones you mentioned are based on novels by Marcel Pagnol (1895-1974).  The ones I mentioned are based on Marcel Pagnol's two childhood memoirs. All four movies were made after his death. Jean and Manon need to be seen in that order because the story arc comprises both movies. Gloire and Chateau should be seen in that order to preserve chronology. Both memoirs are thoroughly delightful but not without poignantly touching moments. The final sequences of Chateau are extraordinary.

I watched MY FATHER'S GLORY and MY MOTHER"S CASTLE today.  Very charming and evocative movies of French childhood and family life in turn-of-the-20th Century southern France.  Glorious scenery and poignant characters really bring life to these two fine films which are both comedic and sad in turn.  They are every-man and every-woman pictures.  Both were dubbed in English not subtitled in English.  Made me kind of wonder what the actors real voices were like but the dubbing was very well done.   A big thumbs up from me for both of them.  As "laffite" stated they are to be watched in sequence with MY FATHER"S GLORY first.  Thank you "laffite" for suggesting these two fine French films to me.  My morning was well spent in watching them on my TV via Amazon.  As "laffite" stated "The final sequences of CHATEAU are extraordinary".  Very poignant viewing as childhoods end as they always do for all of us.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched MY FATHER'S GLORY and MY MOTHER"S CASTLE today.  Very charming and evocative movies of French childhood and family life in turn-of-the-20th Century southern France.  Glorious scenery and poignant characters really bring life to these two fine films which are both comedic and sad in turn.  They are every-man and every-woman pictures.  Both were dubbed in English not subtitled in English.  Made me kind of wonder what the actors real voices were like but the dubbing was very well done.   A big thumbs up from me for both of them.  As "laffite" stated they are to be watched in sequence with MY FATHER"S GLORY first.  Thank you "laffite" for suggesting these two fine French films to me.  My morning was well spent in watching them on my TV via Amazon.  As "laffite" stated "The final sequences of CHATEAU are extraordinary".  Very poignant viewing as childhoods end as they always do for all of us.

 

"Made me think what the actors real voice were like..."

 

It's been awhile but I do recall the narrator's voice was absolutely perfect providing just the right tone ... but I'm glad the dubbing sounded okay.

 

Not to belabor the subject, but anyone enjoying these two movies must consider the trilogy of movies that Marcel Pagnol penned in the 30s. There are affinities in tone between the two  memoirs and the trilogy with the latter featuring two giants of French cinema, Raimu and Pierre Fresnay. The link below offers a brief review that reveals a couple of details but won't ruin it for you. I've always thought these movies provide a clinic on human nature. Pagnol is a genius at knowing people. Some of these character do things that might just on the other side of honesty but we are allowed to see the human side. Pagnol does not judge them. You will no doubt like these characters and you might very well end up loving them. These three movies were offered on Netflix once upon a time, but no more. They were once aired on TCM, some years ago. There some clips on youtube but I wasn't able to find any with English subs. The titles are Marius (1931), Fanny (1932), and Cesar (1936) and MUST be seen in that order. As the review points out, Fanny begins picking up with the next scene of the story and would indeed appear odd if  Marius had not been viewed prior.

 

http://www.avclub.com/review/the-fanny-trilogy-11374

 

ps Fanny (1959?) with Maurice Chevalier and Charles Boyer cram all three original movies into one and do a creditable job I thought, but it differs in tone from the originals, unlike Glory and Castle, it fails to capture Pagnol's magic touch.

 

pps I doubt the trilogy has been dubbed in English but if so I would urge you most emphatically not to watch. Raimu's character will be grievously corrupted without his natural voice and inflection. It would be like dubbing a Jimmy Durante movie into another language. It just wouldn't work. Hold out for the original with Eng subs ... please.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a narrative quality to many classical French movies which I find especially captivating. I have spent the whole weekend watching all the Guitry movies I've found after reading an old, scholarly, but fascinating article on Duhour (Sacha Guitry's collaborator). It's probably the Frenchest thing I have ever watched in my whole life, and damn! I'm glad I have. I really enjoy the way Guitry comments on events on the screen. Duhour is amazing as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a narrative quality to many classical French movies which I find especially captivating. I have spent the whole weekend watching all the Guitry movies I've found after reading an old, scholarly, but fascinating article on Duhour (Sacha Guitry's collaborator). It's probably the Frenchest thing I have ever watched in my whole life, and damn! I'm glad I have. I really enjoy the way Guitry comments on events on the screen. Duhour is amazing as well.

 

I don't know how the hell I posted this twice. And I can't delete it! Anyway, since I have and I can't do nothing, here are the films I would recommend (I don't think it is allowed to post YT links, so I won't, but I watched them there - and no, I am not the poster):

 

Le Diable boiteux
Aux deux colombes
Tu m'as sauvé la vie
Le Trésor de Cantenac
Deburau
La Poison
La Vie d'un honnête homme
Si Versailles m'était conté...
Napoléon
Si Paris nous était conté
Assassins et Voleurs
Les trois font la paire
 
As for the article in question, it is here:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just saw Cleo de 5 a 7. I've seen Agnes Varda films before but it was my first time seeing this one. Such an abrupt ending and the way it ties into the depressing beginning is great.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Le Bonheur was really good as well. Some of the rapid shots reminded me of Jean Luc Godard's style.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us