hamradio

FORGOTTEN Oldies

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Well, you could at LEAST regaled us with THIS-----

BTW, this and "Slow Down" weren't the ONLY Williams "cover" by those guys...  ;)

But the following was also on VI, but I couldn't find a clip from IT....

Sepiatone

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Bobby GOLDSBORO! :o

CHRIST-A-MIGHTY!! :blink:

He too, is high up there on the "overplay" list!

It was YEARS before I could use honey without feeling nauseous. :wacko: :rolleyes:

I'll spare all of ya any clip.  So, we now doin' "Forgotten Oldies, COVERS version"?  B)

Well then, here's my two entries, both original AND "cover"--- However....

I posted the original earlier either here or elsewhere, but not the "cover" so....

Sepiatone

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6 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Bobby GOLDSBORO! :o

CHRIST-A-MIGHTY!! :blink:

He too, is high up there on the "overplay" list!

It was YEARS before I could use honey without feeling nauseous. :wacko: :rolleyes:

I'll spare all of ya any clip.  So, we now doin' "Forgotten Oldies, COVERS version"?  B)

Well then, here's my two entries, both original AND "cover"--- However....

I posted the original earlier either here or elsewhere, but not the "cover" so....

Sepiatone

Sep-- What are you doing with my CD? 

There's nothing that this guy cannot do - - Hank Williams, Chuck Berry, and even John Lee Hooker.

 George Thorogood  is such a great artist even his "Old Grand-Dad" is proud of him. LOL

 

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Because I for years BEFORE hand LIKED "Move It On Over", I then too liked George's cover.  But NOT as much as the original.

I've never been too big on Thorogood as an artist, though.  You know..."To each" and all.  ;)

Sepiatone

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3 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Because I for years BEFORE hand LIKED "Move It On Over", I then too liked George's cover.  But NOT as much as the original.

I've never been too big on Thorogood as an artist, though.  You know..."To each" and all.  ;)

Sepiatone

Why would anyone like any cover of Hank Williams more than the original?

Hank Williams was a genius.

Beethoven was a genius.

 unfortunately we don't have recordings of Beethoven playing all those concertos. We just have to make do with Van Cliburn or Vladimir Horowitz.

But I can bet my bottom dollar that Beethoven could play them better because he wrote them and because he's a genius and he's Beethoven.

 if I keep going I'll have to start a Beethoven thread. LOL

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7 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

Why would anyone like any cover of Hank Williams more than the original?

I'm very surprised that you have this 'take' on someone else covering a song by Williams or anyone else.

There are many reasons one would like a cover over the original such as the musicians playing,  the singing\vocals, the arrangements  (tempo),  the quality of the recording etc..

E.g. I would rather listen to these two gals doing Jambalya then the original Williams version,  because I find this one swings more and the original is just too 'country' (hick sounding) for my taste.  

https://youtu.be/Q3aBTJIanDo

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5 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Because I for years BEFORE hand LIKED "Move It On Over", I then too liked George's cover.  But NOT as much as the original.

I've never been too big on Thorogood as an artist, though.  You know..."To each" and all.  ;)

Sepiatone

Re: Larry Williams

Do you know the story about him and Little Richard?

That would make the best rock and roll movie ever!

Also my brother had a record of his called "High School Romance".

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We always kept a Bobby Goldsboro record around the house just in case we

ran out of maple syrup.

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54 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

We always kept a Bobby Goldsboro record around the house just in case we

ran out of maple syrup.

Bobby Goldsboro was a decent singer and he had several Good Records.

But Songs like " Honey "are just really corny, hokey and stupid, but they were very popular in the fifties and sixties. The worst one I remember was called "Last Kiss" by J. Frank Wilson. It was number one for a couple of weeks on local charts. I can actually remember I had to turn off the radio or change stations when it came on because it was so bad.

And teenage death was not an issue with me because I loved "Leader of the Pack"  by the Shangri-las.

But the weirdest thing is those songs like "Honey" did so well on the charts. But I never have met a person who would admit to actually liking that kind of crap. LOL

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1 hour ago, Princess of Tap said:

Bobby Goldsboro was a decent singer and he had several Good Records.

But Songs like " Honey "are just really corny, hokey and stupid, but they were very popular in the fifties and sixties. The worst one I remember was called "Last Kiss" by J. Frank Wilson. It was number one for a couple of weeks on local charts. I can actually remember I had to turn off the radio or change stations when it came on because it was so bad.

And teenage death was not an issue with me because I loved "Leader of the Pack"  by the Shangri-las.

But the weirdest thing is those songs like "Honey" did so well on the charts. But I never have met a person who would admit to actually liking that kind of crap. LOL

Maybe it was popular because people who lost loved ones in certain circumstances felt a

connection to the story of the song. Otherwise, it certainly was pretty hokey. Besides

Honey, Goldsboro only had a few other hits, though he did better on the country

charts. Teen Angel was another one of those teenage death songs. Can you hear me?

No, I'm dead, numbnutz. 

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1 hour ago, Vautrin said:

Maybe it was popular because people who lost loved ones in certain circumstances felt a

connection to the story of the song. Otherwise, it certainly was pretty hokey. Besides

Honey, Goldsboro only had a few other hits, though he did better on the country

charts. Teen Angel was another one of those teenage death songs. Can you hear me?

No, I'm dead, numbnutz. 

Well at least those songs weren't along the lines of Blue Oyster Cults' Don't Fear the Reaper.

 

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I think it was The Killer, Jerry Lee Lewis, who said it was all those Bobbys who destroyed rock roll--real rock and roll.

And that would be Bobby Darin, Bobby Rydell, Bobby Vee, Bobby Vinton and finally Bobby Goldsboro. All pretty good singers with the exception of Bobby Darin, who was a great singer. And all had more hits and popularity with the fans than Bobby Goldsboro.

But Bobby had one beautiful song called  "See The Funny Little Clown".  It was well done and memorable.

Later after the poppy audience of the 60s had dried up, I heard he went country and recreated his beautiful hair with a substantial toupee.

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5 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Well at least those songs weren't along the lines of Blue Oyster Cults' Don't Fear the Reaper.

 

Funny, I was just listening to Agents of Fortune a few days ago. Reaper is by far the best

song on the album.

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14 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

Bobby Goldsboro was a decent singer and he had several Good Records.

But Songs like " Honey "are just really corny, hokey and stupid, but they were very popular in the fifties and sixties. The worst one I remember was called "Last Kiss" by J. Frank Wilson. It was number one for a couple of weeks on local charts. I can actually remember I had to turn off the radio or change stations when it came on because it was so bad.

And teenage death was not an issue with me because I loved "Leader of the Pack"  by the Shangri-las.

But the weirdest thing is those songs like "Honey" did so well on the charts. But I never have met a person who would admit to actually liking that kind of crap. LOL

Y'know, when the ones you mention came out, I thought, "Man, that's kind of old fashioned, ain't it?"  I mean, "Last Kiss" by J. Frank Wilson was a "cover" of the 1961 WAYNE COCHRAN tune.  And both IT'S, and " Leader Of The Pack"'s post Beatle 1964 releases seemed like so much anachronism.  Those "death-rock" tunes by then, I figured, were a thing of the past, like "Patches", "Teen Angel" and "Tell Laura I Love Her". 

Sepiatone

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11 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Y'know, when the ones you mention came out, I thought, "Man, that's kind of old fashioned, ain't it?"  I mean, "Last Kiss" by J. Frank Wilson was a "cover" of the 1961 WAYNE COCHRAN tune.  And both IT'S, and " Leader Of The Pack"'s post Beatle 1964 releases seemed like so much anachronism.  Those "death-rock" tunes by then, I figured, were a thing of the past, like "Patches", "Teen Angel" and "Tell Laura I Love Her". 

Sepiatone

Sep-- You brought up some really bad ones that I had conveniently forgotten about.

But the Shangri-las number one song, "The Leader of the Pack" is not in the same category with this junk.

The story is told from a girl's perspective and she was a rebel and an independently assertive girl--just to go out with this guy.

 It's more about a girl making a bad choice by going with a gang leader, then just another soppy record about a lost teenage Romance.

 But at the same time it broke new ground because it's told from the girl's perspective.

The group itself broke new ground for women in rock in that they didn't pretend to have the ladylike demure refined quality of The Supremes or the beautiful sensual attractiveness of The Ronettes.

 What the Shangri-las did have, coming from Public Schools in Queens, was a street-smart attitude which was matched with their musical material.

 

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12 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

Sep-- You brought up some really bad ones that I had conveniently forgotten about.

But the Shangri-las number one song, "The Leader of the Pack" is not in the same category with this junk.

The story is told from a girl's perspective and she was a rebel and an independently assertive girl--just to go out with this guy.

 It's more about a girl making a bad choice by going with a gang leader, then just another soppy record about a lost teenage Romance.

 But at the same time it broke new ground because it's told from the girl's perspective.

The group itself broke new ground for women in rock in that they didn't pretend to have the ladylike demure refined quality of The Supremes or the beautiful sensual attractiveness of The Ronettes.

 What the Shangri-las did have, coming from Public Schools in Queens, was a street-smart attitude which was matched with their musical material.

 

I lump 'em all together because of the main underlying theme:

The one they loved DIED!  Like in this parody:

and this National Lampoon send-up---  by GOLDIE OLDIE!  ;)

Sepiatone

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