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Canada Declares Another Human Right For Its Citizens

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This is serious, if the sun violates Canada's new human right law by knocking out the internet by CME, it will be brought before the UN. :wacko:

 

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This is serious, if the sun violates Canada's new human right law by knocking out the internet by CME, it will be brought before the UN. :wacko:

 

sol-tierra.jpg

thatz how they think. stupid.

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thatz how they think. stupid.

 

Really? Because I don't recall reading that imaginary scenario anywhere but here, and that was from Ham and you. So who, exactly, is the stupid one in this situation? The Canadians for declaring that their people have a right to the internet, or you guys thinking that will somehow lead to UN intervention over solar flares and sunspots?

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Really? Because I don't recall reading that imaginary scenario anywhere but here, and that was from Ham and you. So who, exactly, is the stupid one in this situation? The Canadians for declaring that their people have a right to the internet, or you guys thinking that will somehow lead to UN intervention over solar flares and sunspots?

whatz the point of declaring internet access a fundamental right?

 

doe that mean dial-up is a 3rd world condition? :lol:

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In Historic Decision, Canada Declares Internet Access a Fundamental Right for All

 

Under the new broadband strategy, the CRTC aims to provide 100 percent of Canadians access to reliable, world-class mobile and fixed Internet services, which will be available with an unlimited data option.

 

The agency has set the network speed target at 50 Mbps download speed and 10 Mbps upload speed. As of 2015, 82 percent of Canadians had access to that caliber of broadband.

 

In comparison, the United States' Federal Communications Commission (FCC) defines "broadband" as 25 Mbps download and just 3 Mbps upload.

 

Many observers contrasted the CRTC's new declaration to the United States, where the incoming president is likely to roll back open internet provisions as well as other basic services.

 

http://www.commondreams.org/news/2016/12/22/historic-decision-canada-declares-internet-access-fundamental-right-all

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whatz the point of declaring internet access a fundamental right?

 

doe that mean dial-up is a 3rd world condition? :lol:

 

It means all Canadians, no matter how remotely located, will have access to the internet.

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These two are responding with their usual smarmy humor simply because they're jealous at yet another example of how Canadian society is miles and miles ahead of the U.S. in every way - far more civilized; far more rational. This latest example will have Jake gnashing his teeth if he hears about it.

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It means all Canadians, no matter how remotely located, will have access to the internet.

 

Exactly. In a nuts-&-bolts way, it means that the government will help facilitate the set-up of broadband infrastructure throughout the country, even in remote areas.

 

Florida had a similar program, but either governor Jeb or governor Voldemort repealed the program (or the state legislature, I don't recall).

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It means all Canadians, no matter how remotely located, will have access to the internet.

Wish we had this here in the US...would be a great help to those of us that have to live on a fixed income.

Internet access takes a comparatively large chunk of $$$$$ out of our already paltry SS/SSDI checks.

 

Won't hold my breath for the money grubbing *Money talks and everything else walks*USA to offer lower cost internet access to retirees and the disabled.

 

 

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Wish we had this here in the US...would be a great help to those of us that have to live on a fixed income.

Internet access takes a comparatively large chunk of $$$$$ out of our already paltry SS/SSDI checks.

 

Won't hold my breath for the money grubbing *Money talks and everything else walks*USA to offer lower cost internet access to retirees and the disabled.

 

 

 I assume you were a capitalist.   Maybe I'm confusing you with another 'JR'.

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 I assume you were a capitalist.   Maybe I'm confusing you with another 'JR'.

 

You don't seem to know that capitalism without socialist balancing is a very great sin. Very great, indeed.

 

It's sin against God (even if you pretend not to believe in God) and it's sin against our siblings.

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You don't seem to know that capitalism without socialist balancing is a very great sin. Very great, indeed.

 

It's sin against God (even if you pretend not to believe in God) and it's sin against our siblings.

 

I understand that 'pure' capitalism isn't fair and equitable and that there needs to be a degree of 'socialist balancing',  especially for essential services (water,  electricity,  etc..).

 

What I find humorous is when a conservative that is always complaining about 'socialist balancing' complains about being ripped off by greedy capitalist.      (but like I said maybe this isn't the same JR??).

 

As for the Internet in Canada;  while access for remote citizens will be provided,   are there provisions as it relates to user cost?  E.g. will very remote citizens pay around the same monthly rate as those living in cities?      OR does it only ensure access but doesn't address user cost.

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What I find humorous is when a conservative that is always complaining about 'socialist balancing' complains about being ripped off by greedy capitalist.      (but like I said maybe this isn't the same JR??).

 

 

 

JJG you definitely must have me confused with somebody else cuz i've never complained even once in any these threads about "social balancing"...never mentioned "greedy capitalists" before to the best of my recollection either.

Sorry.Not me.

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JJG you definitely must have me confused with somebody else cuz i've never complained even once in any these threads about "social balancing"...never mentioned "greedy capitalists" before to the best of my recollection either.

Sorry.Not me.

Sounds to me like you'd be a proponent of Obamacare or at least some solid form of socialistic healthcare for all.

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As for the Internet in Canada;  while access for remote citizens will be provided,   are there provisions as it relates to user cost?  E.g. will very remote citizens pay around the same monthly rate as those living in cities?      OR does it only ensure access but doesn't address user cost.

 

Can't speak to the details at this time.

 

But philosophically, it's not unlike how the government created the entire infrastructure of the CBC - our national television service that ensured that everywhere - no matter where you lived - you would at a minimum have access to at least one tv signal.

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Wish we had this here in the US...would be a great help to those of us that have to live on a fixed income.

Internet access takes a comparatively large chunk of $$$$$ out of our already paltry SS/SSDI checks.

 

Won't hold my breath for the money grubbing *Money talks and everything else walks*USA to offer lower cost internet access to retirees and the disabled.

 

 

how many times I would hear that playing from my brother's bedroom on his stereo. :D

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JJG you definitely must have me confused with somebody else cuz i've never complained even once in any these threads about "social balancing"...never mentioned "greedy capitalists" before to the best of my recollection either.

Sorry.Not me.

 

Thanks for the clarity.    So the question remains that even if remote access is a 'right' for all users regardless of where they live (e.g. remote locations) what about the cost:  Should that be the same for all users as well?

 

Clearly it will cost more to provide access and service remote users.    How is their per user fee determined verses say city dwellers?  What is a 'fair' rate for these remote users?  

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Sure is nice Canada got their priorities in order - the right to internet over food and shelter.

 

 

Deflecting, eh, ham, always deflecting.

 

Canada deserves credit for this, though, of course, the details have yet to be announced regarding costs. But we have some small communities, our native peoples around James Bay and elsewhere, for example. If they haven't had access to the internet now, they will in the hopefully near future.

 

Canada may lead the way for the world on this one.

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Hoax

 

A great many of the street beggars in Toronto have mobile phones.  For some being on the street is a chosen way of life.  Not taking anything away from how hard it is for some people to fit in with the go-go-go system of life.  It's not for everyone..

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Deflecting, eh, ham, always deflecting.

 

Canada deserves credit for this, though, of course, the details have yet to be announced regarding costs. But we have some small communities, our native peoples around James Bay and elsewhere. If they haven't had access to the internet now, they will in the hopefully near future.

 

Not deflecting, they are labeling it a human right. I thought food, water, shelter, freedom from governmental oppression were.  What's next, video games a right for children. :blink:

 

Like television, music - the internet is a luxury.

 

I see Americans are not the only ones SPOILED!

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Not deflecting, they are labeling it a human right. I thought food, water, shelter, freedom from governmental oppression were.  What's next, video games a right for children. :blink:

 

Like television, music - the internet is a luxury.

 

This is an acknowledgement by the CRTC that in this world of instant communication the internet is no longer a luxury, but something for which all citizens of the country should have access, no matter what their economic means. It's call progress, perhaps small progress compared to food and shelter for everyone but still progress.

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