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EDWARD ALBEE

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This man was such a great American playwright.

 

The theater critics gave him one substantial hit - "Who's Afraid Of Virginia Woolf".

 

Then, afterward, they never forgave him for not re-writing "Who's Afraid Of Virginia Woolf".

 

The earlier plays (before his renaissance) are staggering, literally, staggering, in terms of their originality and command of language.

 

But the theater critics greeted him with a "thumbs down" every single time.

 

Strikingly original pieces of work like "The Ballad of the Sad Cafe", "Tiny Alice", "Malcolm", "A Delicate Balance", "Everything In The Garden", "All Over" and "The Lady From Dubuque".

 

His one-act plays did fare a lot better in this early period - "The Zoo Story", "An American Dream" and "The Death Of Bessie Smith".

 

Thankfully, in the end, the man was welcomed back into the theater as the genuinely great American playwright that he always had been and still was.

 

The recent article, which appeared in "The Gay And Lesbian Review" and was written by a so-called "friend", gives us a view of his final dying days.

 

I am sorry, but the article is a terrible invasion of Mr. Albee's privacy.

 

A true friend would have said "no" to such a thought.

 

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This man was such a great American playwright.

 

The theater critics gave him one substantial hit - "Who's Afraid Of Virginia Woolf".

 

Then, afterward, they never forgave him for not re-writing "Who's Afraid Of Virginia Woolf".

 

The earlier plays (before his renaissance) are staggering, literally, staggering, in terms of their originality and command of language.

 

But the theater critics greeted him with a "thumbs down" every single time.

 

Strikingly original pieces of work like "The Ballad of the Sad Cafe", "Tiny Alice", "Malcolm", "A Delicate Balance", "Everything In The Garden", "All Over" and "The Lady From Dubuque".

 

His one-act plays did fare a lot better in this early period - "The Zoo Story", "An American Dream" and "The Death Of Bessie Smith".

 

Thankfully, in the end, the man was welcomed back into the theater as the genuinely great American playwright that he always had been and still was.

 

The recent article, which appeared in "The Gay And Lesbian Review" and was written by a so-called "friend", gives us a view of his final dying days.

 

I am sorry, but the article is a terrible invasion of Mr. Albee's privacy.

 

A true friend would have said "no" to such a thought.        

He was a very imaginative playwright....some "true friends" just want to make a buck

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Brandon Thane Wilson as Malcolm in Cherry Red's 2004 production of the play, "Malcolm", which was only the third production of this fascinating piece of work -

 

 

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I had the pleasure to know Edward Albee slightly and to work with him and know a few of his friends. In addition to his talent, he was a kind and generous man. He also had a great sense of humour.

 

Although he had the occasional bad patch, when his work was not appreciated, I think as a whole he had the great acclaim during his lifetime, that he deserved. He won Tony Awards for Best Play for Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf and A Delicate Balance and won three Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other playwright apart from Eugene O'Neill. Had the Pulitzer Committee not been overruled by the Pulitzer Advisory Board in 1963, Albee would have tied with O'Neill.

 

His plays continued to be revived during his lifetime, and after his death. I saw a production of A Delicate Balance in 2014, starring John Lithgow and Glenn Close. I hope to see Imelda Staunton and Conleth Hill in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf in London, later this month. (The last time I saw that play was with Diana Rigg and David Suchet). And the lesser-known plays are frequently revived as well. The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia is being revived in London this season, with Damien Lewis and Sophie Okonedo in the lead roles.

 

http://www.trh.co.uk/whatson/edward-albees-the-goat/

 

Edward is gone from us but his work will always be with us. 

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Thankfully, Mr. Albee was welcomed back into the theater with the one, the only "Three Tall Women", which has three women on the stage, who were the same woman at different times in her life.

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Thankfully, Mr. Albee was welcomed back into the theater with the one, the only "Three Tall Women", which has three women on the stage, who were the same woman at different times in her life.

 

Yes -- a great play. I saw it in London, with Maggie Smith. However I know Myra Carter, who played "A" in the New York production. Myra offstage is one of the great characters!  She later played the Nurse in a revival of Albee's All Over, a role originally played by Betty Field.

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Yes -- a great play. I saw it in London, with Maggie Smith. However I know Myra Carter, who played "A" in the New York production. Myra offstage is one of the great characters!  She later played the Nurse in a revival of Albee's All Over, a role originally played by Betty Field.

Myra Carter used to eat at one of my favorite Village hangouts - Manatus on Christopher Street.

 

I can't say that I got to know her, though.

 

She lived across the street in a building on the top floor.

 

I once heard her say to a companion that it was a very noisy location.

 

I would love to see "All Over".

 

It's on a DVD, I believe.

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Myra Carter used to eat at one of my favorite Village hangouts - Manatus on Christopher Street.

 

I can't say that I got to know her, though.

 

She lived across the street in a building on the top floor.

 

I once heard her say to a companion that it was a very noisy location.

 

I would love to see "All Over".

 

It's on a DVD, I believe.

 

That's so funny!  Many years ago, I had to arrange to meet Myra to begin work on a project. We didn't know each other. She said let's meet at Manatus (which I thought was on Bleecker Street). I knew what she looked like. When I introduced myself, she shouted, "You're a baby!"  (I wasn't, I was just younger than she expected).

 

Myra complained about the noise she had to endure, from living above a pizzeria.

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That's so funny!  Many years ago, I had to arrange to meet Myra to begin work on a project. We didn't know each other. She said let's meet at Manatus (which I thought was on Bleecker Street). I knew what she looked like. When I introduced myself, she shouted, "You're a baby!"  (I wasn't, I was just younger than she expected).

 

Myra complained about the noise she had to endure, from living above a pizzeria.

Edward Albee worked with her again in a revival of "The Sandbox" at The Cherry Lane Theater.

 

Unfortunately, she took sick and had to be replaced.

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From his early work, before his renaissance with "Three Tall Women", what is your favorite Edward Albee play?

 

Mine is "Everything In The Garden".

 

It needs a major revival.

 

It is a breathtaking piece of dramaturgy.   

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