GGGGerald

Bette and Joan

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good drag name or no though?

 

Yeah, ESPECIALLY if the drag performer might also be a pole dancer, huh Lorna.

 

(...and as in while performing the crowd is yelling "WORK it, baby! WORK it!")

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OMG! Who thought up THAT casting?????????

Liberace wasn't leading man in SSW, just the piano player. He was not yet a big enough name for that. Vincent Price was not in that film. I remember this film from AMC back in the day. Unfortunately, coming to Shelley Winters first from her later performances, knowing that at the mid-point of the last century she was marketed as a sex symbol at Universal, all I can see is her later, heavier and less-attractive self and view her in films such as this one and FRENCHIE in that light. Luckily for her, her participation around this time in PLACE IN THE SUN helped change that perception of her, from glamour girl to character actress.

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good drag name or no though?

I can see a female impersonator prefer the more sonorous and much more trilling Carrera, for the emphasis that can be had with said trilling.

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i don't think Joan expected to win for POSSESSED, in fact, according to INSIDE OSCAR at least, she attended the ceremony (maybe even for the first time?) and given her various neurosis that lead her to not attend the year she won, i doubt she would've gone had she thought it might really happen.

 

I read somewhere that many thought Roz would win for MOURNING BECOMES ELECTRA so it was sort of an upset that Loretta won for FARMER'S DAUGHTER.

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Liberace wasn't leading man in SSW, just the piano player. He was not yet a big enough name for that. Vincent Price was not in that film. I remember this film from AMC back in the day. Unfortunately, coming to Shelley Winters first from her later performances, knowing that at the mid-point of the last century she was marketed as a sex symbol at Universal, all I can see is her later, heavier and less-attractive self and view her in films such as this one and FRENCHIE in that light. Luckily for her, her participation around this time in PLACE IN THE SUN helped change that perception of her, from glamour girl to character actress.

 

 

Did he have any lines? :D

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i don't think Joan expected to win for POSSESSED, in fact, according to INSIDE OSCAR at least, she attended the ceremony (maybe even for the first time?) and given her various neurosis that lead her to not attend the year she won, i doubt she would've gone had she thought it might really happen.

 

 

Maybe so, but I doubt Joan thought she'd lose to Loretta! Definitely a dark horse that year, considering the competition.......

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I read somewhere that many thought Roz would win for MOURNING BECOMES ELECTRA so it was sort of an upset that Loretta won for FARMER'S DAUGHTER.

 

 

Yes it was. And Roz was considered the front runner. Obviously voters thought otherwise (Or didnt bother to see the film.  Not exactly geared to the popcorn crowd.......)

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Did he have any lines? :D

 

Yes -- Liberace had a fairly big supporting role (as I recall). It was his first film. Luther Adler played the villain, Macdonald Carey the romantic interest.

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Yes it was. And Roz was considered the front runner. Obviously voters thought otherwise (Or didnt bother to see the film.  Not exactly geared to the popcorn crowd.......)

Maybe Loretta Young had divine intervention on her side.

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Maybe Loretta Young had divine intervention on her side.

 

Could be!!! :D

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Yes -- Liberace had a fairly big supporting role (as I recall). It was his first film. Luther Adler played the villain, Macdonald Carey the romantic interest.

 

 

I want to see this!!! :D

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Random notes from Divine Feud: A magazine asked George Brent, Bette's crush at the time, to list the 10 most glamorous gals in Hollywood; Joan and Loretta made the list, not Bette....Bette was not pleased.

 

In the early 40s Bette dated Tom Lewis, later Loretta's husband.

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Random notes from Divine Feud: A magazine asked George Brent, Bette's crush at the time, to list the 10 most glamorous gals in Hollywood; Joan and Loretta made the list, not Bette....Bette was not pleased.

 

In the early 40s Bette dated Tom Lewis, later Loretta's husband.

 

 

LOL. I remember reading that. Also George seemed to be chintzy with his gifts too...

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in re: the brief film career of Liberace:

 

I had the priviledge of seeing SINCERELY YOURS (1955) the last time It was on TCM. It's his one and only leading role in a (stifles laughter) romantic drama (snorts) based on an old George Arliss film called THE MAN WHO PLAYED GOD. He costars with a visibly panicked Joanne Dru as love interest, and Dorothy Malone (so you know the make-up trailer was the place to be on that set!)

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in re: the brief film career of Liberace:

 

I had the priviledge of seeing SINCERELY YOURS (1955) the last time It was on TCM. It's his one and only leading role in a (stifles laughter) romantic drama (snorts) based on an old George Arliss film called THE MAN WHO PLAYED GOD. He costars with a visibly panicked Joanne Dru as love interest, and Dorothy Malone (so you know the make-up trailer was the place to be on that set!)

 

 

LOL. I have seen parts of it, but not the whole thing. Looking forward to it. WHEN is it on again??? :D

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in re: the brief film career of Liberace:

 

I had the priviledge of seeing SINCERELY YOURS (1955) the last time It was on TCM. It's his one and only leading role in a (stifles laughter) romantic drama (snorts) based on an old George Arliss film called THE MAN WHO PLAYED GOD. He costars with a visibly panicked Joanne Dru as love interest, and Dorothy Malone (so you know the make-up trailer was the place to be on that set!)

 

To tie it all together, The Man Who Played God (1932) was the film that really brought Bette Davis to stardom. She credits George Arliss, who chose her for that film, with giving her the break that really got her career started.

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I just watched HUMORESQUE (maybe I should put this in the "I Just Watched" topic).  Joan is excellent as is John Garfield.   I love Oscar Levant asking Joan if her husband interferes with her marriage - great line!  Anyway, I really like Joan's look in this film - her clothes and hairstyle are perfect.  She is beautiful.  Those glasses look good on her, too.  I don't know if it's her best performance (I will always be partial to MILDRED PIERCE) but she's really good.  I am recording AUTUMN LEAVES for future viewing.

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I can say that for me Joan was at her most alluring in "Humoresque"; her look was not so harsh. And Bette in "Eve" was attractive....so I'm assuming it's the hair that did it.

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I can say that for me Joan was at her most alluring in "Humoresque"; her look was not so harsh.

 

I agree. Joan was glamourous in Humoresque, as well as stylish. A combination of makeup, costumes, lighting and, of course, that great hair. She had always been a physically striking woman but the years had somehow matured her features to make her more interesting, less hard, by 1946 when she made this film. I never thought she looked more attractive than in Humoresque, even with those little reading glasses on.

 

46hum13july7.jpg

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Kirk Douglas was `'ìnvited' to her house as she was doing for promising actors....in 1946 he went there in his bio he mentions she had  very firm and trim body,Joan always took care of herself.

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I'll admit that though I recorded Feud, I haven't watched a single episode yet.  I don't know what is preventing me from doing so.  It sounded so interesting when the project was announced and while I don't typically bother with reviews, I haven't heard anything positive about this show.  Everyone whom I've talked to, or "talked" to (like on this forum) have had lukewarm reviews for it.  Perhaps that has diminished my excitement to watch this program.  Work has been very busy lately, so my time to catch up on movies is limited and I don't want to waste my "movie time" (1 movie, perhaps 2 if I start watching early enough) on something that is lousy. 

 

Anyway...

 

Regarding the real Bette Davis and Joan Crawford:

 

Given the choice between the two women, I'm definitely a bigger Bette Davis fan.  She has such screen presence and gives her all to every character that she plays (no matter how small the part, like in Three on a Match or how ridiculous the part, like Beyond the Forest), she is fascinating to watch.  I also appreciate her versatility.  She can be a romantic love interest, like in Now,Voyager, then she can be a total witch (not the word I wanted to use) like in Little Foxes and then move into absurd camp in films like Beyond the Forest and What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? And, while I believe that 'Baby Jane' was supposed to be over-the-top absurd whereas Bette's campy characterization of Rosa was probably done on purpose (Bette hated Beyond the Forest and wanted out of her Warner Brothers contract), she makes both films watchable and enjoyable. My favorite Bette Davis films are The Letter and Now, Voyager

 

Joan Crawford on the other hand, is someone who I've kind of warmed up to over the years, I haven't always been a fan.  I am still not too keen on Joan's 1930s output (except for The Women).  Don't even get me started on Joan's musical abilities.  She is a terrible dancer.  However, I am really enjoying her 1940s/1950s output.  She is excellent in Mildred Pierce and deserves her Oscar (though honestly, I wish there had been a tie so that Gene Tierney's excellent performance in Leave Her to Heaven could have been awarded too).  I also really enjoyed her in Flamingo Road

 

In fact, a couple months ago, I got a Joan Crawford boxed set that came with The Women, Humoresque, Possessed, Mildred Pierce and The Damned Don't Cry (I got the whole boxed set for 90-cents! Don't ask how or why.  Just chalk it up to bad cashiering.  There were two other costly mistakes on this receipt as well.  Mistakes that benefited me, but will probably count against the store's "shrink" level).  I've seen The Women and Mildred Pierce (which I love.  It made me a fan of Ann Blyth as well), but haven't seen the other three films.  I prefer Crawford's later work maybe because she often taps into two of my favorite genres: noir and melodrama.  This era is also where she exhibits her famous Joan Crawford mouth and eyebrows.  Perhaps it is a bit over the top, but it for whatever reason works for me. 

 

With the exception of 'Baby Jane,' I am not really a fan of much of Davis' late 1940s-1950s output (with the exception of a handful of films, June Bride, Beyond the Forest and All About Eve), but this time period is my favorite of Crawford's work.  After 'Baby Jane,' both ladies' careers kind of descended into the campy horror film genre, which is not my favorite except, I did like Davis in Burnt Offerings

 

It is interesting that two women who disliked each other so intensely (though I have to wonder how much of their feud was exaggerated in order to publicize What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?) had careers with such similar trajectories.

 

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I'll admit that though I recorded Feud, I haven't watched a single episode yet.  I don't know what is preventing me from doing so.  It sounded so interesting when the project was announced and while I don't typically bother with reviews, I haven't heard anything positive about this show.  Everyone whom I've talked to, or "talked" to (like on this forum) have had lukewarm reviews for it.  Perhaps that has diminished my excitement to watch this program.  Work has been very busy lately, so my time to catch up on movies is limited and I don't want to waste my "movie time" (1 movie, perhaps 2 if I start watching early enough) on something that is lousy. 

 

 

I'm surprised to see you say this, as many of the people on this thread have stated how much they have enjoyed the show.

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I'm surprised to see you say this, as many of the people on this thread have stated how much they have enjoyed the show.

(In Droopy Dog voice)

"I don't like it."

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I can say that for me Joan was at her most alluring in "Humoresque"; her look was not so harsh. And Bette in "Eve" was attractive....so I'm assuming it's the hair that did it.

 

Totally agree about the hairstyles.  Very flattering for both women.

 

As for FEUD reviews, speedracer5, you didn't say where you read these reviews.  The show has gotten a positive vibe overall on this site plus I read the recaps on VULTURE and EW (especially VULTURE) and their comments are overall complimentary.  I'm enjoying it, especially the performances by the leads, Alfred Molina and Judy Davis.  It isn't perfect but it is entertaining and I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in film history and/or fans of Bette and Joan.  But I get time is precious and we all have priorities.

 

As for Bette and Joan, I've loved Bette seemingly forever.  Favorites are EVE, NOW VOYAGER, THE LETTER and THE LITTLE FOXES.  In recent years I, too, have grown in appreciation of Joan, especially her work in the 1940's - 1950's.

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