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johnm001

Your Favorite Dance Numbers

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Eleanor Powell dancing "Broadway Rhythm" from "Broadway Melody of 1936".

Eleanor Powell dancing "Fascinating Rhythm from "Lady Be Good"

"Barn Raising Sequence", "June Bride" and "Lonesome Polecat"

from "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers".

"Merry Widow Waltz" from "The Merry Widow" (1934).

Fred Astaire & Cyd Charisse "Dancing In the Dark" from "Bandwagon".

Fred Astaire & Eleanor Powell dancing "Begin the Beguine from "Broadway Melody of 1940".

Fred Astaire & Ginger Rogers in "Never Gonna Dance" from "Swingtime"

Fred Astaire & Ginger Rogers in "Cheek to Cheek" from "Top Hat"

Fred Astaire & Ginger Rogers in "Let's Face the Music and Dance"

from "Follow the Fleet".

Fred Astaire & Rita Hayworth in "I'm Old Fashiioned"

from "You Were Never Lovelier"

"Lullaby of Broadway" from "Gold Diggers of 1935"

Gene Kelly in "Alter Ego Dance" from Cover Girl

Gene Kelly in "Singin In the Rain" from "Singin in the Rain"

Gene Kelly and Cyd Charisse in "Heather on the Hill" (both versions)

Ann Miller, Tommy Rall, Carol Haney, Bob Fosse, Bobby Van and Jeanne Coyne

in "From This Moment On" from "Kiss Me Kate".

"Mein Herr" from "Cabaret"

"Dancing", "Hello, Dolly", and "Put on Your Sunday Clothes" from "Hello Dolly"

Cyd Charisse dancing the title song in "Silk Stockings".

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Cinemascope:

 

What is your favorite and what makes it so?

 

I've already stated I love the Bonnie Jean dance in Brigadoon, so I won't bore people with a repeat, but I would like to know your take on your favorite.

 

Anne

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Gosh I think it would be nearly impossible to narrow it down to just one, I would be inclined to start with something that had Cyd Charisse in it, either with Gene Kelly in Singin' in the Rain or with Fred Astaire in The Bandwagon. Those are sentimental favorites, although I'm also very much an admirer of all the Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers numbers from their RKO days. Also the ones FA did with Rita Hayworth, You'll Never Get Rich and You Were Never Lovelier.

 

All of that plus nearly every dance number featured in the That's Entertainment trilogy, which I try to watch at least once every year. All of these numbers are full of energy, have a very old-fashioned charm to them, and remind us of many wonderful things that made the Golden Era so great! :x

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Anne, just a bit of trvia about Audrey. Paramount paid for an option on the rights to the German film THE TRAPP FAMILY SINGERS, which was, at the time, Germany's most successful motion picture of all time. They wanted Audrey to play Maria, in the film,for which she would have been perfect. The was before the musical had even been written. She declined, in favor of THE NUN'S STORY. The option lapsed, and the rights were secured by Mary Martin. Years later, when they were going to make the film version of THE SOUND OF MUSIC, Audrey along with Doris Day, lobbied the hardest, to secure the role. The studio wanted Day, the director, William Wyler, wanted Hepburn. When Wyler was replaced, and Wise came on board, both actresses lost out on the role.

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Cinemascope:

 

It's a good thing you can ignore it and watch something else when The Sound of Music is on, isn't it?

 

Why do you say that about Doris Day? She didn't have the acting skills to carry her all through the movie. She was a wonderful Calamity Jane, but I can't see her as Maria at all, and why would they continue putting Audrey in a mainly singing role and have to dub her voice again?

 

The only other person I could possibly imagine as Maria would be Debbie Reynolds. She could have handled the fun-loving postulant, the seven kids, and the love story with the dad.

 

Anne

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I agree. Doris Day should've been cast in The Sound of Music. If anyone is doubting her acting skills, they need to re-watch Love Me or Leave Me.

Doris was also the original choice for South Pacific, but was considered to be too expensive by 20th Century Fox.

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It really is a shame, both Sound of Music and South Pacific would have benefitted enormously from Doris Day's ample charm and all-around fabulousness! B-)

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I can see why Ruth wanted Jane Powell. They look just alike.

 

 

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

 

 

Her signature tunes were "Shine On Harvest Moon", "Ten Cents a Dance" and "Love Me or Leave Me", and her other popular recordings included "Button Up Your Overcoat", "Mean to Me", "Exactly like you", and "Shaking the Blues Away".

 

Born in David City, Nebraska, she left home at age seventeen to attend art school in Chicago. Her job designing costumes at the Marigold Gardens nightclub led to employment singing and dancing in the chorus there.

 

She became a featured vocalist at the nightclub and married gangster Martin "Moe the Gimp" Snyder on July 12, 1922. He managed her career, booking radio appearances, and eventually had her signed to an exclusive recording contract with Columbia Records.

 

She made her Broadway debut in the Ziegfeld Follies of 1927, and appeared in a number of other hit shows in rapid succession, including Simple Simon and Whoopee!.

 

In Hollywood she made a long series of movie shorts between 1929 and 1936, and three feature movies in 1933 and 1934. In 1936, She appeared in London in Ray Henderson's Transatlantic Rhythm.

 

In 1937 she fell in love with her pianist, Myrl Alderman, who was consequently shot by her husband, Moe Snyder ? but survived. Snyder was jailed for the assault, and Etting divorced him on November 30, 1937. She married Alderman in December 1938.

 

The scandal effectively ended her career, though she briefly had a radio show in 1947. Alderman died on November 16, 1966.

 

Etting died in Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1978, aged 81

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Shearerchic:

 

As usual, I phrased that wrong. I'm not knocking Doris' acting skills, I just don't think she had the emotional range needed for the part. Think about this. Most of her movies were light - Glass Bottom Boat, Tunnel of Love, Pillow Talk, Touch of Mink and others like those.

 

In her serious roles, she stayed in a turmoil through 3/4 of the movie - Love Me, or Leave Me, The Man Who Knew Too Much, Midnight Lace, even Julie, her child was missing, her husband was abusive, or she was being stalked, very little change of emotion.

 

In Young at Heart, she did light bits with Gig Young, but Frank put her in turmoil again, but the switch wasn't authentic (not to me). In Sound of Music the actress has many facets of her personality to explore, love of God, of man, of children, and song. I just don't think Doris was the right type of actress for it.

 

Anne

 

P.S. I never saw a photo of Ruth Etting before, the similarity of her and Jane Powell is uncanny. I also loved Doris in Love Me or Leave Me, and Please Don't Eat the Daisies - I have most of her films on tape.

 

Message was edited by:

mrsl

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Based on what you yourself said, I would say Doris Day had quite the emotional range needed for the lead role in The Sound of Music.

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I agree. Doris Day should've been cast in The Sound of Music. If anyone is doubting her acting skills, they need to re-watch Love Me or Leave Me.

Doris was also the original choice for South Pacific, but was considered to be too expensive by 20th Century Fox.

 

The reason Day may have come off too expensive, is that she was contractually obligated to three studios at the time. MGM, Paramount and Warners. For her to have done SOUTH PACIFIC, Fox would have had to cough-up some major bucks to settle her contracts, or three studios would have had to wait for her (which was highly unlikely). The memos are quite interesting, and Buddy Adler appears to really want her in the role. Joshua Logan's memos imply that he didn't want her. Adler seemed to ignore him and continued to try to work something out. It just fell-apart in the end, and a role she was born to play, went to someone else. She was the front-runner for THE SOUND OF MUSIC. Even Richard Rodgers was on record assuming she would play the role. When William Wyler mentioned Audrey Hepburn's name, there was a bit of a backlash among industry people, because everyone figured on it being Doris Day. Although, Ernest Lehman, who was the first person signed-on for TSOM, did not want Day, and lobbied hard, to have Wyler replaced, when he began to tamper with Lehman's vision of the film.

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Thanks Johnm_001:

 

n any case, my favorite dance number is Bonnie Jean, from Brigadoon.

 

Anne

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If it isn't supported by a book, I'd say it's probably highly questionable. He's posted a lot of very questionable statements before without the slightest bit of evidence, so naturally I tend to be really rather skeptic, unfortunately.

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Not unless I write it. It's from my research of R&H musicals, among other things. It's all there for public consumption, in the UCLA and Academy Archives.

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If it isn't supported by a book, I'd say it's probably highly questionable. He's posted a lot of very questionable statements before without the slightest bit of evidence, so naturally I tend to be really rather skeptic, unfortunately.

 

This from the women (if she is a woman), who hasn't a single thought or opinion that she didn't copy and paste from someone else. Meretrix Intentio!

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Well there's a lot of it that just sounds like someone with poor imagination cooked it up. I really wouldn't believe any of it unless you posted links with actual information from reliable sources.

 

And all of it coming from someone who hates women and loves to use foul and filthy language that degrades women, when he's frustrated with some disagreement.

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