VivLeighFan

Share your unpopular opinions here!

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and the fact that for the single exception of myself, that no other tcm poster shares my view DOES NOT mean that you all or tcm is right to ignore colorizing.

 

if that were so there would be no colorized King Kong posted on youtube...but there is. :)

 

tcm should seriously reconsider their premature write-off of colorizing...just to placate the self-righteous purist.

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I don't say the following as a protest against some earlier opinions on this thread but because I think THIS is an unpopular opinion:

 

I like Jeanette MacDonald.

 

I particularly enjoy watching her in the pre-code period when she appeared in some naughty comedies of Ernst Lubitsch, though I think she particularly shines in Mamoulian's Love Me Tonight as an actress who could play sly innuendo humour on screen, as well as possess a sensual quality (denied her when she went to MGM for her family safe sterile series of operettas with Nelson Eddy).

 

However, one of her Eddy operettas probably has my favourite MacDonald performance:

 

Rose Marie.

 

Yep, the one known for the legendary Indian Love Call scene (which I do enjoy though I realize much of the world will parody it since it is, let's face it, pure corn). However, this film also showed off Jeanette's comedic flair more than any of her other Eddy films I feel.

 

Take a look at a scene in which her character, a famous prima donna opera star now roughing it in the Canadian wilderness where no one knows of her celebrated fame in the big cities, arrives in a rough tavern. She's hungry and has no money.

 

There's a hip swinging h o n k y tonk singer, low brow vulgarity personified, but giving the rough patrons what they want as she belts out a tune and flaunts her body, all for the coins being flung at her by the appreciative crowd. A starving Jeanette watches her and tries to take notes of her appeal.

 

MacDonald then has a marvelous scene in which she tries to emulate the h o n k y tonk singer, with wild arms gestures and hip swings as she sings a song. She's completely out of it and the rough crowd turn their collective noses up on her. The celebrated prima donna can't make a dime here, in contrast to the attentive crowds and applauding opera critics of the big cities.

 

This scene is a prime illustration of what a superb comedienne Jeanette MacDonald could be for those who don't appreciate the lady's musical talents. She even brings a sympathetic fish out of water vulnerability to the moment, as well.

 

Jeanette-MacDonald-Gilda-Gray-Jimmy-Conl

 

Now, I've got to say Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy never would have made all those movies at MGM had they not been tremendously popular.

 

They both have wonderful voices and could have easily sung full time in Opera.

 

If today there's some kind of a pejorative attitude about them, I would say that people who have that opinion may be lacking the required knowledge of Operetta in order to appreciate it. They have a right to dislike that kind of music and t prefer not to listen to those kinds of artists -- but they don't have the right to denigrate artist, just because they don't understand the music or appreciate it.

 

For example, I don't understand or want to listen to Miles Davis play jazz. However, I recognize that he's a great artist and I have respect and appreciation for him as an artist and for his art form.

 

Both Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy were truly talented artists and don't deserve to be the butt of parlor jokes.

 

As far as their acting was concerned I thought it was quite credible and certainly as good, if not better better than many singers and dancers who became movie stars.

 

My father was a big fan of Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy and we would watch all the movies together on the late show. I think Maytime is my favorite because of the music, as well as the plot featuring an outstanding supporting performance by John Barrymore.

 

I bought the records that they made together, as well as the soundtrack recordings.

 

All I can say is that if people don't care for this kind of music that's all right, but at the same time, they have no right to denigrate the Artistry of Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy.

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 I am of the opinion that TCM oughta show the colorized prints of Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House, Chain Lightning and this june the colorized print of The Longest Day to get viewer's reaction to the overblown negativity that colorization has been prematurely dismissed with.

 

I saw the colorized print of Chain Lightning when it was syndicated nationally and I am assuming that many of you did not.

 

TCM oughta show that one alone to get viewer's reactions.

 

colorizing has not been given a fair shake.

 

Where are the classic movie purist AGAINST colorization. ;)

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Where are the classic movie purist AGAINST colorization. ;)

well, all I've ever heard here on these forums is...

 

1. colorizing old films fails to make them appeal to millennials.

 

or

 

2. the Black & White purists considered colorizing tantamount to mutilation.

 

that's what I've read...here!

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well, all I've ever heard here on these forums is...

 

1. colorizing old films fails to make them appeal to millennials.

 

or

 

2. the Black & White purists considered colorizing tantamount to mutilation.

 

that's what I've read...here!

 

Well, ya know ND, those two arguments ARE pretty much valid.

 

(...in fact, I've always kind'a gotten the idea that one of the main reasons you're such a colorization advocate is because maybe like what I've heard from more than a few of those millennials over the years, B&W movies "hurt your eyes" TOO!)

 

LOL 

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Black and white film is very easy on the eyes. Mine anyway.

 

I find it soothing.

 

And acting and plot are kept right up front, no distractions from them.

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Black and white film is very easy on the eyes. Mine anyway.

 

I find it soothing.

 

And acting and plot are kept right up front, no distractions from them.

 

Yep, same here.

 

Funny ain't it that one of the movies often said to contain some the best acting and some the most memorable dialogue in all of cinematic history is in B&W?! I'm talkin' CASABLANCA here, of course.

 

(...gotta admit though that when it comes to colorization, I have always wondered if colorized versions of some of John Ford's early B&W westerns/cavalry films might not be such a bad thing...what with the possibility of seeing Monument Valley in all its red rock southwestern glory)

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Glenn Ford is not all he is cracked up to be.

 

Not sure if this is such an "unpopular opinion" here, MM.

 

Can't tell you how many times I've read someone around here say they can not understand how Glenn Ford became a leading man/A-List actor.

 

(...and I'd be one of 'em)

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Not sure if this is such an "unpopular opinion" here, MM.

 

Can't tell you how many times I've read someone around here say they can not understand how Glenn Ford became a leading man/A-List actor.

 

(...and I'd be one of 'em)

+1

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I'm 38 and if I had to state a preference, I'll take black-and-white over color any day. Don't know why, but I've always found it relaxing too, and nothing is more gorgeous than a well lit and clean copy of a classic black-and-white for me.

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James Dean is a horrible actor.  He mumbles, he overacts, he screams: "You're tearing me apart"

and all of that is supposed to "stand in" for talent.  Don't get him  --  never did, never will.

 

Lydecker

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Not sure if this is such an "unpopular opinion" here, MM.

 

Can't tell you how many times I've read someone around here say they can not understand how Glenn Ford became a leading man/A-List actor.

 

(...and I'd be one of 'em)

I think Ford is better when he did comedy.

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Glenn Ford is not all he is cracked up to be.

I have a confession to make about this particular actor. I've had a personal prejudice against him for years that has nothing to do with his acting ability.

 

So I may have said negative things about him in the past.

 

But moving forward in a more objective light, I have found some of his work that I've seen recently to be quite good.

 

The first time I saw him was in A Stolen Life, I was impressed with how he played this sweet naive guy who evolved into a profoundly unhappy man. All the more impressive because he had to play against two Bette Davis'-- he was her personal choice for the film role.

 

But until I saw The Big Heat, I didn't realize his capacity as a dramatic actor and how much he deserves his reputation as a movie star leading man.

 

With this film, Fritz Lang did for Glenn Ford what he had done for Spencer Tracy in Fury.

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I can't stand Being There.

 

I can't stand Peter Sellers in general. I've yet to laugh at anything he has ever done.

 

Its like, I get the fake Indian accent. Now move on to another scene ! Okay, you have no ability to turn your head and see what's behind you. But, the scenes just drag on and on and on.

 

I did enjoy the first Pink Panther. Beautiful women, beautiful locations and in the end, Sellers  gets arrested !! :D

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I can't stand Peter Sellers in general. I've yet to laugh at anything he has ever done.

 

Its like, I get the fake Indian accent. Now move on to another scene ! Okay, you have no ability to turn your head and see what's behind you. But, the scenes just drag on and on and on.

 

I did enjoy the first Pink Panther. Beautiful women, beautiful locations and in the end, Sellers gets arrested !! :D

 

 

I always thought that Peter Sellers was some kind of an inside artist who was much admired by the acting Intelligentsia--like a comedic Olivier-- coming from that English background. And all the rest of us just had to put up with him because he had this great reputation here and abroad.

 

But it seems like he was successful in a number of films with an international audience.

 

I tried to watch him in several films, like the World of Henry Orient. However, I never could get into it because he was so boring.

 

But I have to admit in Dr. Strangelove he did get my attention!

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well, all I've ever heard here on these forums is...

 

1. colorizing old films fails to make them appeal to millennials.

 

or

 

2. the Black & White purists considered colorizing tantamount to mutilation.

 

that's what I've read...here!

 

 

Black and white film is very easy on the eyes. Mine anyway.

 

I find it soothing.

 

And acting and plot are kept right up front, no distractions from them.

 

 

Yep, same here.

 

Funny ain't it that one of the movies often said to contain some the best acting and some the most memorable dialogue in all of cinematic history is in B&W?! I'm talkin' CASABLANCA here, of course.

 

(...gotta admit though that when it comes to colorization, I have always wondered if colorized versions of some of John Ford's early B&W westerns/cavalry films might not be such a bad thing...what with the possibility of seeing Monument Valley in all its red rock southwestern glory)

 

That wouldn't work for milennials or anyone else. Black and white films bring with them an expectation, even the newer films shot in black and white. "This will be a film with a real plot". "No distractions, pay attention". To colorize would make it just another film.

 

Now, those films with great scenery might benefit from it. I don't think its a cut and dry, all or nothing deal.

 

Would this really be a blasphemy ?

 

Casablanca%20II.jpg

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