Barton_Keyes

Noir Alley

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Wow, this is scary, I have actually remembered a series of things correctly in this and other threads.

 

The SUSPENSE! RADIO version of THE HIGH WALL does indeed star ROBERT YOUNG and HERBERT MARSHALL and it is indeed excellent.

 

Really, I HIGHLY RECOMMEND GIVING THIS A LISTEN, PREFERABLY IN THE DARK OR ON A LONE COUNTRY ROAD- it is one of the finest radio episodes I've heard (and i've heard me share.)

 

especially enjoyable if you've seen the movie.

 

 

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Wow, this is scary, I have actually remembered a series of things correctly in this and other threads.

 

The SUSPENSE! RADIO version of THE HIGH WALL does indeed star ROBERT YOUNG and HERBERT MARSHALL and it is indeed excellent.

 

Really, I HIGHLY RECOMMEND GIVING THIS A LISTEN, PREFERABLY IN THE DARK OR ON A LONE COUNTRY ROAD- it is one of the finest radio episodes I've heard (and i've heard me share.)

 

especially enjoyable if you've seen the movie.

 

 

Thanks for that, Lorna.  Tomorrow's a holiday (where I live), so maybe I'll have a chance to listen to it. 

You seem to know quite a bit about old "classic" radio shows - - I guess they're the equivalent of old "classic" movies, but a lot less well-known.

 

By the way, I agree with you about Robert Taylor. A handsome piece of wood. Still, he didn't stop me from enjoying High Wall.

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Back to THE HIGH WALL for just a moment-------

Until I saw this film, I had no idea Robert Taylor was a world-class actor.

But after this movie, I took him seriously.

 

 

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This week on Noir Alley: They Live by Night

 

Just too depressing.

 

It's not depressing; it's sad. There's a difference.

 

And yes, sad it is. But it's also very moving and tender, probably the sweetest  - not an adjective applied very often to this genre -  film noir ever made.

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It's not depressing; it's sad. There's a difference.

 

And yes, sad it is. But it's also very moving and tender, probably the sweetest  - not an adjective applied very often to this genre -  film noir ever made.

 

So very true.    Like the noir In a Lonely Place,  They Live by Night is directed by Nicholas Ray.   Both are similar in that there are very sweet \ romantic moments that are moving and tender,  but overall there is a pale of sadness draped over the film.

 

Like the Lubitch touch in romantic comedies,  Ray had his own special touch in his noir films.

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I'm extremely upset by Noir Alley's scheduling on Sunday morning at 10 AM when I am in church.  I have to figure out the DVR thing because it's definitely sacrilegious to  play hookey from church to watch the murder, sex, and other mayhem on Sunday mornings!

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I'm extremely upset by Noir Alley's scheduling on Sunday morning at 10 AM when I am in church.  I have to figure out the DVR thing because it's definitely sacrilegious to  play hookey from church to watch the murder, sex, and other mayhem on Sunday mornings!

 

Now that is funny.   Oh and happy birthday to our gal Olivia DeHavilland.  101.  Wow.    I know I have told this story before but about 30 years ago when I fell hard for Olivia (after seeing The Strawberry Blonde),   I purchased a fine bottle of Red wine that would age well  (say 10 years to reach its peak).  I saved it to open when she passed.   Well,  I had to replace the wine twice because each had reached its peak.    So I gave up on that and will go out and purchase one when the sad event takes place.

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It's not depressing; it's sad. There's a difference.

 

And yes, sad it is. But it's also very moving and tender, probably the sweetest  - not an adjective applied very often to this genre -  film noir ever made.

 

I would like to reply by saying my admittedly simplistic post was meant to convey my own reaction to the film, and was not intended to summarize it.  I really just wanted to make a placeholder for the movie to see how others would react.

 

In one of the tributes to Robert Osborne there was a quote where he said something to the effect that "movies don't change, but we do." So you can revisit films later to see if your opinion on them changes.  It is probably my own current shortcoming that I have reached a point where I am not able to enjoy films that seem to have an inevitability of tragedy and do not have at least one character that you can root for with some hope of achieving at least a small success.  Thus I have been 'depressed' by the fact that several of the Noir Alley films have fallen into this category for me.

 

Before I forget I also wanted to add that I thought Eddie Muller did a wonderful job before and after the film - he spent about 5 minutes each going into his thoughts on the film and the details of the production.  That is an eternity in TCM terms and I really appreciate it from Eddie and TCM.

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Now that is funny.   Oh and happy birthday to our gal Olivia DeHavilland.  101.  Wow.    I know I have told this story before but about 30 years ago when I fell hard for Olivia (after seeing The Strawberry Blonde),   I purchased a fine bottle of Red wine that would age well  (say 10 years to reach its peak).  I saved it to open when she passed.   Well,  I had to replace the wine twice because each had reached its peak.    So I gave up on that and will go out and purchase one when the sad event takes place.

 

Olivia was my dad's favorite actress, and when he began to fail, I'd visit him in the nursing home with big coffee table movie books filled with pictures.  As we'd go through the pictures of the leading ladies, he'd say, "You know which one I want to see."  And then he'd complain that the pictures weren't as beautiful as she was.  Sadly, he passed in 2012 -- yes, he would still be younger than Olivia is now.  

 

She's one of my favorites, too, the little woman with soft brown eyes and the will of steel to fight Warner Brothers, who despite Strawberry Blonde, and many other fine performances, refused to recognize her true worth.

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If you liked Farley Granger and Cathy O'Donnell in the Noir Alley film They Live By Night (1948), you might want to check out Side Street (1950) in which they also appear together.  Side Street is currently scheduled to be shown on TCM this coming Friday at 11:30 am Eastern time.

 

I have not yet seen Side Street but it has positive reviews on IMDB -

 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0042960/

 

Per the listing, Side Street is directed by Anthony Mann, who was responsible for several fine Westerns with Jimmy Stewart, among others.

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Thanks for that, Lorna.  Tomorrow's a holiday (where I live), so maybe I'll have a chance to listen to it. 

You seem to know quite a bit about old "classic" radio shows - - I guess they're the equivalent of old "classic" movies, but a lot less well-known.

 

 

over the last couple of years, i've had access to sirius satellite radio which has a classic radio channel (and i'm in the car a fair amount), what with THIS and the fact that all old radio has fallen into the public domain and can be accessed via youtube or archive.org, (and with wifi and my phone), i've taken  to exercising or doing yardwork while listening to any number of old radio episodes and- one thing about classic radio that enthralls (and amazes me) is that it does not seem to have been governed by as strict a Code as motion pictures, which is ironic because radio was more prevelant at the time than movies.

 

criminals go unpunished, people get away with murder, the supernatural has no limits, and there is A LOT of violence- and often radio versions of films have different endings (one such wonderful example would be the SCREEN DIRECTOR'S PLAYHOUSE version of THE DAMNED DON'T CRY.)

 

so again, listen to that suspense episode of THE HIGH WALL, any of you who have the time, it's highly recommended.

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here, again, ROBERT YOUNG and HERBERT MARSHALL in the SUPENSE! episode THE HIGH WALL:

 

 

And for you ROBERT TAYLOR fans, here is his appearance on the SUSPENSE episode THE HOUSE IN CYPRESS CANYON, which is another great example of how radio pushed the limits of censorship.

 

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If you liked Farley Granger and Cathy O'Donnell in the Noir Alley film They Live By Night (1948), you might want to check out Side Street (1950) in which they also appear together.  Side Street is currently scheduled to be shown on TCM this coming Friday at 11:30 am Eastern time.

 

I have not yet seen Side Street but it has positive reviews on IMDB -

 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0042960/

 

Per the listing, Side Street is directed by Anthony Mann, who was responsible for several fine Westerns with Jimmy Stewart, among others.

It's a guilty pleasure favorite of mine. It's got a great car chase through lower Manhattan that's worth a viewing alone.

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No angst this week as Eddie presented T-Men (1947), with the government Treasury men as the straightforward good guys and the organized counterfeiters as the bad guys.  Sort of a criminal procedural companion to He Walked By Night (1948), complete with the Reed Hadley narration.  Eddie cracked me up with his put-down of the stiff introduction provided by real-life T-Man Elmer Irey.  Eddie was also right to point out the cinematography as a master class in lighting.  Don’t want to spoil the movie by saying too much but there was a bit of a surprising scene in the last third which emphasized the high stakes for undercover work.  Also, I think it’s the second case where Eddie has mentioned how the mob financed a film by working on the down-low with the head of the production code office, Joseph Breen.  Say it ain’t so, Joe!

Looking forward to Eddie’s comments next time for Gun Crazy (1950), a film which I have seen before but I’m sure Eddie will shed some new light on it for us.

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I wonder why Eddie said last week they were going to show Possessed with Joan Crawford???

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I wonder why Eddie said last week they were going to show Possessed with Joan Crawford???

 

Not sure what happened Hibi.  In the wrap-up I watched, Eddie referred to a "crazily exciting film from 1950" that he had to write a book about.  I think it's this one:

 

http://www.eddiemuller.com/guncrazy.html

 

The TCM schedule and noiralley.tcm.com both still show Gun Crazy on Sunday.  Possessed is scheduled for October 1.

 

Sorry if I am missing something.

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I'm sure I heard him right. Very strange. I did notice it was different on the schedule and recorded the film shown as I havent seen it.

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I'm sure I heard him right. Very strange. I did notice it was different on the schedule and recorded the film shown as I havent seen it.

 

You're right, Hibi, I'm pretty sure Eddie said it would be "Possessed".

 

By the way, I didn't post anything on this thread this week because the Noir Alley pick for July 8 - which turned out to be "T-Men"  (not "Possessed", as we expected)  was not allowed to be shown in Canada.Instead, they aired a re-make ( sort of) of "The Letter",  "Unfaithful", with Anne Sheridan. I liked it ok, but would have preferred the one everyone else ( everyone not in Canada) got to see.

 

I hate, hate, HATE it when this stupid "No Canadian Rights" business comes up. Like tonight , they're airing "Foreign Correspondent". But not in Canada.  Aaargh !

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You're right, Hibi, I'm pretty sure Eddie said it would be "Possessed".

 

By the way, I didn't post anything on this thread this week because the Noir Alley pick for July 8 - which turned out to be "T-Men"  (not "Possessed", as we expected)  was not allowed to be shown in Canada.Instead, they aired a re-make ( sort of) of "The Letter",  "Unfaithful", with Anne Sheridan. I liked it ok, but would have preferred the one everyone else ( everyone not in Canada) got to see.

 

I hate, hate, HATE it when this stupid "No Canadian Rights" business comes up. Like tonight , they're airing "Foreign Correspondent". But not in Canada.  Aaargh !

 

I've seen the schedule substitutions.  What's ridiculous is that when films that are part of a series are substituted.  Like tonight, I see that Confessions of a Nazi Spy is substituted for Foreign Correspondent.  That's not even a Hitchcock film! I guess the subject matter is comparable, but if a film is part of a series, you can't just randomly sub in some other movie.  In the Hitchcock class, Hitch's career is being discussed chronologically.  The films in the TCM Spotlight on Hitchcock are being shown in chronological order too.  We're up to the early 1940s in Hitchcock's career.  So not only is Confessions of a Nazi Spy not Hitchcock, it doesn't even chronologically fit into tonight's series.

 

Even the Noir Alley subs are ridiculous as I doubt that Eddie Muller is preparing separate introductions for Canada's schedules.  I recorded T-Men but haven't watched it yet.  

 

My biggest beef with the Noir Alley series however is the time it's scheduled.  It's on at 7am on Sunday morning! It should be on at night! Sunday morning is not the time I associate with the gritty world of noir.  

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I suspect the change was made last Sunday because Canadians could not be trusted to see the detailed images of U.S. bank notes and Treasury Department credentials that were included in T-Men.

 

;)

 

Sorry, bad joke - there's a warning at the beginning of T-Men that reproduction of the currency or Treasury Department credentials shown in the film is strictly prohibited.  (Not that anything could be done with those 1940's images anyway.)

 

It does look like both Canada and the U.S. are scheduled to see Gun Crazy this coming Sunday, so hopefully we will all be in sync again for a while.

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You're right, Hibi, I'm pretty sure Eddie said it would be "Possessed".

 

By the way, I didn't post anything on this thread this week because the Noir Alley pick for July 8 - which turned out to be "T-Men"  (not "Possessed", as we expected)  was not allowed to be shown in Canada.Instead, they aired a re-make ( sort of) of "The Letter",  "Unfaithful", with Anne Sheridan. I liked it ok, but would have preferred the one everyone else ( everyone not in Canada) got to see.

 

I hate, hate, HATE it when this stupid "No Canadian Rights" business comes up. Like tonight , they're airing "Foreign Correspondent". But not in Canada.  Aaargh !

 

 

Possibly the part about Possessed was filmed separately from the rest of his wrap up (another take) and got in there somehow. I'd never thought of Possessed as a noir, but I guess it could be considered one.

 

I can sympathize Speedy. Noir Alley runs at 10 AM Eastern. A bit later than your time, but STILL too early for me. I'm never up at 10AM Sunday or Sat., unless there's a special event going on.

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Turning my thoughts from being spam crazy to going gun crazy...

I had no idea that Dalton Trumbo was involved in many of the classic Noir movies.  So far on Noir Alley we have seen The Prowler, He Ran All the Way, and this week Gun Crazy.  I’ve seen Gun Crazy on TCM before so I’m curious to hear any comments from those who are seeing it for the first time.

Nice that Eddie showed part of the previous interview he did with Peggy Cummins.  I didn’t realize that Peggy was Welsh until I heard her accent and looked her up on the internet.  Too bad it appears her career did not include many other high profile American films.

Only two more films to go before the hiatus for Summer Under the Stars.  I’m looking forward to the 2nd one, Born to Kill, so I can get me some more Claire Trevor.

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I caught up with a couple of Noir Alley movies:  T-Men and Gun Crazy.  I've seen Gun Crazy before.  I love the bank robbery scene, the payroll robbery and the finale.  The performances are excellent and I'm a little disappointed that Eddie didn't mention John Dall who I think is just as good as Peggy Cummins in this film.  One of my favorite noirs and I might like to check out Eddie's book about it.  T-Men was good with several characters getting seriously beat up/killed.  Plenty of action in this one, too.  The camera work was outstanding.  I'm going to miss Noir Alley when it ends and I hope TCM brings it back next year.

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I thought I hadnt seen T-Men before but after about 20 mins in, realized I had. I still watched it again. Nice little ****...another Wallace Ford great performance.

Edited by TCMModerator1
Edited For Language

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