Barton_Keyes

Noir Alley

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1 hour ago, TheCid said:

For me, Saturday is Midnight and I am asleep by then.  So if I don't record it, 10:00 AM on Sunday is not too bad.

One of Eddie's promos showing him trying to decide between Midnight and hard liquor or Sunday AM and coffee.  He pours the liquor into the coffee cup.

I hadnt seen that promo! I'm never in bed at midnight. (I'm barely there during the week). I'm a night owl.

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Alicia and Dave are just hosts, not having their own show, so to speak. As for Noir Alley showing twice, and having been talked about previously, I still don't see why it gets special treatment. All of TCM is programmed for the Eastern time zone. Prime Time is 5 PM out here in the West.

I don't watch Noir Alley, so this is only conversation for me.

The one thing I do like about Eddie is putting the booze in the coffee.

I will never be completely happy with just one time zone.

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2 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

They need me as host. Unfortunately, my face was made for a career in RADIO :lol:

Me too. Funky fading in and out long distance AM, in the dark of night.

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A heads up Panic In The Streets on at Noon. A great Noir no matter what Sgt_Markoff thinks, :D

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50 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

A heads up Panic In The Streets on at Noon. A great Noir no matter what Sgt_Markoff thinks, :D

FYI, husband and wife screenwriter team EDNA and EDWARD ANHALT wrote the screenplays for both PANIC IN THE STREETS and THE SNIPER, they won an Oscar for the first and were nominated for the second.

1950_view_directing_writing_Mankiewicz.j

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On 10/31/2018 at 2:53 PM, Hepburn Fan said:

Me too. Funky fading in and out long distance AM, in the dark of night.

I love radio faces. It's fun to imagine how the face may or may not match the voice!

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Well anybody watch it? I was out with a trip and will have to wait until it pops up on demand. Whaja think?

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Well, I'm pretty familiar with The Sniper. I've seen it two or three times, and in fact own a copy ( it's included in a Columbia noir boxed set I've got.) I missed it this weekend as I was away and did not get a chance to watch it. But I watched it earlier this year, so it's still pretty fresh in my mind.

This is not a "fun" noir. Some noirs are fun to me; they tend to include glamourous nightclub scenes, witty dialogue, atmospheric settings, things like that. The Sniper is not like that at all. It's very serious, and actually quite depressing. Depressing not only as a story in its own right, but also because, sadly, these kinds of people seem to be around acting out their horrible obsessions more than ever today, much more so than in 1952.

It's what they called a "message movie" back then. Clearly the gun man is very sick, psychologically. We see him trying to contact the mental health professional who was trying to help him before he was released from hospital (evidently long before he should have been), but he cannot reach him. No one seems to notice how messed up he is, or care. The message of The Sniper is, we must detect mental illness in this kind of person and try to treat them, certainly keep them under observation, before they lose all control and end up killing innocent people. It is true, the final scene, where we see the killer waiting pathetically for the police to find and arrest him, is very effective. I simply do not know enough about this kind of mental illness to comment as to whether the plea this film seems to be making is the right way to deal with such people.

Anyway, just looking at it objectively and not as a social message movie,  The Sniper is well-made and well directed, in a "procedural" kind of way. I like Edward Dmtryk, and would expect nothing less than a taut,engrossing work from  him. I thought the actor who played the sniper, Arthur Franz, was quite good - it's a difficult role to play, a profoundly sick man with a compulsion to kill, who yet needs to convey at least a modicum of sympathy to the audience. I'd never heard of Arthur Franz before, yet when I looked him up, it seems he was quite a prolific actor, appearing in many movies, including The Caine Mutiny and Beyond a Reasonable Doubt.

Marie Windsor makes an appearance here. She's always good; it's too bad we don't get more of her in The Sniper; you feel genuinely shocked and sad when her character is shot by the killer.

I think I understand why so few people have posted here about this film today. First, as I said, good in its own way though it may be, it's not enjoyable, obviously because of its subject matter. Second,  coming just a week after the horrible massacre in Pittsburgh, the airing of The Sniper would be disturbing to many viewers, and I'm thinking a lot of people may have chosen to not watch the film at this time. Again, I can absolutely  understand that.

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I've seen The Sniper before, and I have a copy on that same Columbia noir set that you mention, MissW. I liked the film, and it's one of the few Arthur Franz performances I was impressed with. I didn't watch it this time as I was out most of the morning, but I did catch the tail end with Eddie's comments about Wally Cox and the future Mrs. Stanley Kramer.

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7 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

I've seen The Sniper before, and I have a copy on that same Columbia noir set that you mention, MissW. 

Ditto I have the same set. Hope it pops up, I've just watched a film with Wally and it would be interesting to hear the comments.

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Mommy did it. Mommy, mommy, mommy. I don't remember seeing this one before. Fairly

entertaining, though it gets a bit repetitious in the middle. Yeah, the nutso likes to go around

shooting women. We get it. I always love it when there is a short text introduction to a

movie that is basically an exploitation flick to make it seem as though it's really more of a

public service than a crime movie. Okayyyy. Some good visuals of the underbelly of SF

and whimsical ones of Eddie getting up close and personal with his rifle. Mommy. I thought

that might have been Wally Cox, though he wasn't in the scene very long. I suppose a

rat fink like Dmytryk was a bit of a sniper himself, targeting his former friends, though 

with less lethal results. 

 

 

 

 

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14 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Well, I'm pretty familiar with The Sniper. I've seen it two or three times, and in fact own a copy ( it's included in a Columbia noir boxed set I've got.) I missed it this weekend as I was away and did not get a chance to watch it. But I watched it earlier this year, so it's still pretty fresh in my mind.

This is not a "fun" noir. Some noirs are fun to me; they tend to include glamourous nightclub scenes, witty dialogue, atmospheric settings, things like that. The Sniper is not like that at all. It's very serious, and actually quite depressing. Depressing not only as a story in its own right, but also because, sadly, these kinds of people seem to be around acting out their horrible obsessions more than ever today, much more so than in 1952.

It's what they called a "message movie" back then. Clearly the gun man is very sick, psychologically. We see him trying to contact the mental health professional who was trying to help him before he was released from hospital (evidently long before he should have been), but he cannot reach him. No one seems to notice how messed up he is, or care. The message of The Sniper is, we must detect mental illness in this kind of person and try to treat them, certainly keep them under observation, before they lose all control and end up killing innocent people. It is true, the final scene, where we see the killer waiting pathetically for the police to find and arrest him, is very effective. I simply do not know enough about this kind of mental illness to comment as to whether the plea this film seems to be making is the right way to deal with such people.

Anyway, just looking at it objectively and not as a social message movie,  The Sniper is well-made and well directed, in a "procedural" kind of way. I like Edward Dmtryk, and would expect nothing less than a taut,engrossing work from  him. I thought the actor who played the sniper, Arthur Franz, was quite good - it's a difficult role to play, a profoundly sick man with a compulsion to kill, who yet needs to convey at least a modicum of sympathy to the audience. I'd never heard of Arthur Franz before, yet when I looked him up, it seems he was quite a prolific actor, appearing in many movies, including The Caine Mutiny and Beyond a Reasonable Doubt.

Marie Windsor makes an appearance here. She's always good; it's too bad we don't get more of her in The Sniper; you feel genuinely shocked and sad when her character is shot by the killer.

I think I understand why so few people have posted here about this film today. First, as I said, good in its own way though it may be, it's not enjoyable, obviously because of its subject matter. Second,  coming just a week after the horrible massacre in Pittsburgh, the airing of The Sniper would be disturbing to many viewers, and I'm thinking a lot of people may have chosen to not watch the film at this time. Again, I can absolutely  understand that.

I agree wholeheartedly with your review. I thought the Sniper was excellent. The only other film I recall with Arthur Franz is Abbott & Costello Meet the Invisible Man. I thought Franz did a hell of a job in The Sniper. Two thumbs up for me. 

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1 hour ago, Brigid O'Shaughnessy said:

Can't be 100% sure that was Wally Cox as one of the laundry pressers in The Sniper.  Not listed under cast and not on his IMDb list of movie credits.

I would say that was Wally Cox. Looked like him. I recognized his voice even before he closed the presser. 

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When the poster of Marie Windsor's character was shown I remembered having seen The Sniper many years ago.  Overall an above average movie and more than just another crime or police procedural.  MissWonderly already did a very good review.

Windsor always impresses me.  Of course not as much as in Swamp Women, but that is whole 'nother subject.  Actually her best role for me was in The Narrow Margin.

Enjoyed Eddie's recap of the SF scenes.  Also noted that Corliss Archer's and Dobbie Gillis' "fathers" (John Eldredge and Frank Faylen) had roles in this.

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Next up is The Threat (1949) with Charles McGraw in the lead (more or less), but as a criminal. Virginia Grey and Michael O'Shea are also in it.  I saw it several years ago and it is interesting and should hold your attention.

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:huh: p.s. What shooting in Pittsburgh? Meh, nvm, gave up keeping track of that kind of thing long ago

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17 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

:huh: p.s. What shooting in Pittsburgh? Meh, nvm, gave up keeping track of that kind of thing long ago

Wow! Really Sarge?!

(...Well, I hope you at least know that there was an election yesterday, doncha?!)

;)

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Shootings every three months on average. Like I have time for that?  :huh:

All the 'official' press-release and town-hall verbiage is exactly the same sanctimonious, flowery, half-hearted, maudlin BS every time.

"The management and staff of (_x__campus, _ x__mall, _x__city) extends our deepest (alternately: 'most heartfelt') sympathies ...to the grieving families and loved-ones ...of the unfortunate victims of this shocking tragedy...now, however, is when we need to all pull together in a time for healing..."

("Hey! How about getting rid of handguns and assault weapons, Senator?")

"Next question, please..ah yes--you have your hand up --there in the back..."

 

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Okay so I had to skip over all THE SNIPER discussion because it never did show up on my Sling TV TCM On Demand after I missed it last weekend.

I did catch PANIC IN THE STREETS on that very On Demand access portal. WOW!!!!!  I purchased the Blu-Ray immediately.  I LOVED every minute of that movie.

THE THREAT (1949)  - I enjoyed.  I did not immediately look to purchase it :D, but I would definitely sit down and watch it again if it came on.  I will say that I'm not quite sure why anyone ever thought O'Shea was going to be a major star.  His performance was fine, but I didn't really see anything outstanding.  I can only assume it has to do with the fact that he could act, sing, and dance so people believed he would make it big?  I don't know.  McGraw definitely stole the show, but I thought the whole cast was pretty good.  Virginia Grey also really stood out.  And Muller was definitely right about the climax.

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35 minutes ago, Looney said:

Okay so I had to skip over all THE SNIPER discussion because it never did show up on my Sling TV TCM On Demand after I missed it last weekend.

 

Ditto for me, I own it but was really wanting to hear Mullers comments about The Sniper.

 

The Threat I've seen before and watched it again today. My biggest complaint and it's a relatively minor one was that it was way too studio bound, for my tastes. I more enjoy the Noirs that were shot on location, it's like once you get a taste for them and the "real" world, the studio backlots really come off noticeable and uninteresting.

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Ditto to Looney's comments on The Threat.  McGraw and Grey were definitely the stars of the movie.  As usual, Eddie's comments were informative and well worth hearing.  I just couldn't buy O'Shea as a cop.  Somehow he just didn't have the right look or maybe because I had seen him in comedies before.

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9 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

 

Ditto for me, I own it but was really wanting to hear Mullers comments about The Sniper.

 

The Threat I've seen before and watched it again today. My biggest complaint and it's a relatively minor one was that it was way too studio bound, for my tastes. I more enjoy the Noirs that were shot on location, it's like once you get a taste for them and the "real" world, the studio backlots really come off noticeable and uninteresting.

Interesting that you make note of the location issue here, CJ.

Ya see, according to the IMDb filming location page for The Threat, parts of it were indeed filmed on location in Riverside and Palm Springs California, and just as was suggested by the plot.

And once again and just as you and I have discussed before about how we both so especially enjoy watching Noirs set in earlier times in our respective old stomping grounds of NYC(yours) and the L.A. area(mine), I found one of the things in particular enjoyable about this film was that those aforementioned areas east of Los Angeles WERE much more rural and undeveloped in the immediate postwar era than what is now the eventual urban sprawl of SoCal, and as was depicted in this film and once the action left the then urban center of L.A.

(...and in fact before Interstate 10 was built in the late-1950s and now days the major route from L.A. to Palm Springs, the road depicted in the film which the hijacked moving van is shown being driven upon would have looked very much as the old two-lane road which was depicted, and thus which led me to believe that that portion of the film had indeed been filmed on location and not in RKO studio's back lot, although I suppose I could be wrong about this)

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