Barton_Keyes

Noir Alley

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On 1/10/2019 at 2:17 PM, Hibi said:

I didnt know what Poutine was until I looked it up. YUCK!

Well if you're spending a wintery day like a true Canadian -embracing a bitter, cold winter day skating on the Rideau Canal- nothing tastes better than a big paper cup of hot poutine from a vendor truck. You've got to burn calories to enjoy consuming such a heavy snack.

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I'm looking forward to tonight's Noir Alley.  I set it up to record on the DVR.  I've seen this film once or twice before, but I can't remember much about it.  It has such a great cast: Lucy, George Sanders, Charles Coburn, Boris Karloff... I also enjoy Douglas Sirk's films.  Apparently Lured is a remake of a 1939 French film called, Pieges

Next week's offering is Murder, My Sweet with Dick Powell and Claire Trevor.  I've seen this film before too, but I can't remember much about it.  

Apparently, I need to pay more attention to what I'm watching! 

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Sorry I've fallen way behind following this thread, but I have been watching.  In reverse order.

LURED (1947) - I really liked almost all of it despite being able to predict the end as soon as the I saw the guilty actor's face appear on screen the first time. :D Loved how it looked.  Loved Lucy.  Loved Zucco, Karloff, Coburn, and everyone in the film was great.  I can't say that I enjoyed all the twists, but I am definitely putting this movie in the category of possibly needing to own some day. 

HIS KIND OF WOMAN (1951) - Okay this was a very good movie until Vincent Price showed up - then it became a great movie.  I am a Price fan and I had never seen this picture before.  WOW! was he fantastic.  The only real downfall of the film is that he isn't in it enough.  But seriously, you put Robert Mitchum and Raymond Burr in a movie and I am going to watch it.  Add Vincent Price and I am kicking myself that I hadn't found this film before now.  Okay that does remind me of another issue; Raymond Burr also isn't in the movie enough.  But that isn't the big issue.  I will have to read other's comments on this because I need to know I am not crazy.  Didn't Burr have an accent in his first scene that seemed to disappear when he reappeared?  I do plan to go back eventually and read what others have said over the past few weeks.  I've just been busy and sick.

DOUBLE INDEMNITY (1944) -  Do I really have to comment?! :lol:  I've seen it so many times and it is still a classic and I still have my same complaint. I guess it isn't really a complaint, but more of a least favorite part - the entire Zachetti / Lola plot line.  It is one of the alternate Universe wishes I have that I'd like to see what happens with the story if those two aren't a part of it.  It is a strange thing that I've always had where I feel let down when the story starts focusing on those two.  Anyway, I watched the film for the twentieth time to hear Muller's comments and I am glad I did.  I really wished there Noir Alley Blu-Ray releases. 

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I've seen Lured a long time ago but have rewatched it today. Lucy is good in this one (as always) and Karloff gives the film an eery feel. The story and cinematography remind me a lot of Hitchcock's the Lodger which may be intentional. The London sets are very well done too. I thought some of the plot twist was a bit meh.... too but overall an enjoyable film.

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***SPOILERS***

I'd seen this film before, but apparently didn't watch it very well, because I didn't remember anything about watching it.  It was like watching it for the first time last night! 

I really liked Lured.  Lucille Ball was excellent as usual.  I also thought George Sanders was good too.  He was his usual rakish self, but he brought a level of romance to the part that I enjoyed.  I agreed with Eddie Muller's assessment that Sanders and Ball were sexy in this film.  Boris Karloff was so good at playing the creep.  He had such a great voice.  I cannot help but picture The Grinch when he talks.  I am also a big fan of Charles Coburn and it was interesting to see him in a non-comedic part.

I liked the twists and turns that the plot took.  I thought it was great that Sanders, who often portrays a villainish type character and it would be natural that he could charm Ball into his trap, turned out to be genuine in his affection for her.  I knew her encounter with Karloff would just be her meeting up with a creep, because it was so early in the film.  

I thought the plot twists were fun and I enjoyed how the story unfolded.  I liked Ball's character.  She wasn't the damsel in distress.  She wasn't the femme fatale.  She was an intelligent, fearless, female detective who aided Scotland Yard in solving not only the murder of her friend, but the murders of other women as well.  I also loved her wardrobe.  Ball worked as a model prior to coming to Hollywood, and I can see why.  She wears clothes very well. 

I also love Douglas Sirk.  The sets and overall look of the film was gorgeous.  

This was a great film, one that I wouldn't mind owning. 

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2 hours ago, Looney said:

Sorry I've fallen way behind following this thread, but I have been watching.  In reverse order....

....  I do plan to go back eventually and read what others have said over the past few weeks.  I've just been busy and sick.

 

Thanks for all your mini-reviews on the latest Noir Alley screenings, Looney. Hey, we all get busy or preoccupied with other things, there's nothing that says you have to post here every week or anything, don't feel bad about that.

I'm sorry to hear you've been sick, hope you're feeling better now.

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4 hours ago, Looney said:

HIS KIND OF WOMAN (1951) - Okay this was a very good movie until Vincent Price showed up - then it became a great movie.  I am a Price fan and I had never seen this picture before.  WOW! was he fantastic.  The only real downfall of the film is that he isn't in it enough.  But seriously, you put Robert Mitchum and Raymond Burr in a movie and I am going to watch it.  Add Vincent Price and I am kicking myself that I hadn't found this film before now.  Okay that does remind me of another issue; Raymond Burr also isn't in the movie enough.  But that isn't the big issue.  I will have to read other's comments on this because I need to know I am not crazy.  Didn't Burr have an accent in his first scene that seemed to disappear when he reappeared?  I do plan to go back eventually and read what others have said over the past few weeks.  I've just been busy and sick.

 

Now that you mention it, Burr did have more of an Italian accent at the beginning of the movie, as well as speaking in Italian.  If you liked His Kind of Woman, try Macao with Mitchum and Russell.  No role such as Price had, but William Bendix has a pretty good one in it.  Gloria Grahame has a very good role in it as well.  The Big Steal is another one, but with Mitchum, Bendix and Jane Greer.

SPOILERS

As for Lured, I'm somewhat on the fence.  Definitely a two star movie, but somehow still can't get enthusiased over it.  The Karloff bit seemed added on just to capitalize on Karloff and of course he was in it too early to be a serious contender for the villan.  I have seen it a few times before, but been so long that I actually forget who done it.  I knew it wasn't Sanders and I suspected Alan Mowbry at first.   One problem I have (and it is mine) with Lucille Ball is accepting her in serious roles.  She can do them, but I have too many I Love Lucy and her comedic movies.  Although I do enjoy The Dark Corner and her role in it.

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The great French poet Charles Baudelaire playing second fiddle to a bunch of dull

English Johnnies. Tres triste.

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11 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

The great French poet Charles Baudelaire playing second fiddle to a bunch of dull

English Johnnies. Tres triste.

The only thing I know about Baudelaire is that he is in a comic comment in The Wheeler Dealers.

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1 hour ago, TheCid said:

The only thing I know about Baudelaire is that he is in a comic comment in The Wheeler Dealers.

Charley's really getting whacked, movie-wise. I presume that they were using actual translations

from Baudelaire, but who knows. There is a dark, somewhat purple prose or rather poetry side

to his work, but that is hardly the only thing in his poetry. There was an hilarious episode of

the 1960s version of Dragnet where some high school kid reads Baudelaire and other French poets

of that time and takes them too literally and goes out and commits crimes. Of course we learn

that Sgt. Friday knows quite a bit about Baudelaire, though Gannon seems clueless. 

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1 hour ago, TheCid said:

The Karloff bit seemed added on just to capitalize on Karloff and of course he was in it too early to be a serious contender for the villan.

Karloff's role in Lured is a direct translation (too direct, if you ask me) of Erich von Stroheim's performance in Pièges (1939, the inspiration for Lured). Both performances are exceptionally prominent and pungent red herrings.

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1 hour ago, Vautrin said:

Charley's really getting whacked, movie-wise. I presume that they were using actual translations

from Baudelaire, but who knows. There is a dark, somewhat purple prose or rather poetry side

to his work, but that is hardly the only thing in his poetry. There was an hilarious episode of

the 1960s version of Dragnet where some high school kid reads Baudelaire and other French poets

of that time and takes them too literally and goes out and commits crimes. Of course we learn

that Sgt. Friday knows quite a bit about Baudelaire, though Gannon seems clueless. 

It wasn't actually Baudelaire. The poem Inspector Temple reads is from "Harmonic du Soir" by Lord Alfred Douglas, not Beaudelaire.

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39 minutes ago, Gershwin fan said:

It wasn't actually Baudelaire. The poem Inspector Temple reads is from "Harmonic du Soir" by Lord Alfred Douglas, not Beaudelaire.

I thought Douglas was the translator of the Baudelaire poem into English.

https://archive.org/stream/collectedpoemsof00dougrich/collectedpoemsof00dougrich_djvu.txt

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2 minutes ago, Thenryb said:

I thought Douglas was the translator of the Baudelaire poem into English.

https://archive.org/stream/collectedpoemsof00dougrich/collectedpoemsof00dougrich_djvu.txt

This is what the iMDB says.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0039589/trivia?ref_=tt_trv_trv

The poem read by Inspector Temple (Charles Coburn) to Julian Wilde (Cedric Hardwicke) is from "Harmonic du Soir" by Lord Alfred Douglas, not Beaudelaire, despite the fact that he is holding a copy of "Flowers of Evil" (Fleurs du mal), a collection of Beaudelaire's poetry.
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6 minutes ago, Gershwin fan said:

This is what the iMDB says.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0039589/trivia?ref_=tt_trv_trv

The poem read by Inspector Temple (Charles Coburn) to Julian Wilde (Cedric Hardwicke) is from "Harmonic du Soir" by Lord Alfred Douglas, not Beaudelaire, despite the fact that he is holding a copy of "Flowers of Evil" (Fleurs du mal), a collection of Beaudelaire's poetry.

And this is from the archive of the collected poems of Lord Alfred Douglas:

70 



Harmonie du Soir 

(From the French of Baudelaire) 

Void venir le temps. 

Now is the hour when, swinging in the breeze, 
Each flower, like a censer, sheds its sweet. 
The air is full of scents and melodies, 
O languorous waltz ! O swoon of dancing feet ! 

Each flower, like a censer, sheds its sweet, 
The violins are like sad souls that cry, 
O languorous waltz ! O swoon of dancing feet ! 
A shrine of Death and Beauty is the sky. 

The violins are like sad souls that cry. 
Poor souls that hate the vast black night of Death ; 
A shrine of Death and Beauty is the sky. 
Drowned in red blood, the Sun gives up his breath. 

This soul that hates the vast black night of Death 
Takes all the luminous past back tenderly. 
Drowned in red blood, the Sun gives up his breath. 
Thine image like a monstrance shines in me. 
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Re:  LURED, so Lucy and George see each other -- what? -- only about three or four times and then get engaged?  That's a swift courtship, lol.

It seemed like the script didn't quite know what to do with Sanders' character, though.  "Unmitigated cad" or "lovestruck (anti)-hero?"  I'm a big fan of this actor but for some reason his role didn't really jell with me.

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Yes, Harmonie du Soir is the title of a Baudelaire poem. I'm guessing that this is

Douglas' translation of that poem, perhaps a rather free translation. And funny

that the Hardwicke's character's last name is Wilde. Next time let them pick on

Verlaine.

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For those who liked His Kind of Woman, Macao is on Monday, Jan 14/15 at 3:45 AM.  Somewhat similar to HKW, but not as much humor.  I've discussed it in previous posts above.

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Turns out I'd seen Lured before. I remembered as soon as the villain made his first appearance. Another film that would have been better with some trimming. Went on far too long.

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I didn't get to watch it yet, though I have seen it before. My impressions of the film based on memory was that it seemed a bit too lavish (from it's description as being about a dance hall hostess who acts as a decoy) for a taxi dance barn.

Do we actually ever see Lucy working at her job?  

My lingering memory of this film is Lucy and Sanders sitting at a table that looks like a set of a fancy nightclub. Taxi dance joints were pretty sleazy. I checked one relic out, Majestic Ballroom Dancing, in the mid 60s down on Times Square and if you've seen Killers Kiss or the one depicted in The Rat Race it was the spitting image of those.

Long stairway up to a second story anteroom with a ticket booth, a turnstile to the ballroom proper which looked pretty chintzy, sort of on a high school prom level.  

Maybe in London they had a better image? Anyway I was a bit disappointed with the film which played a bit more like a love story for me anyway.

I'll check out On Demand to catch Eddie's comments.

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7 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Do we actually ever see Lucy working at her job?  

Yes, there is a scene in the beginning of the film in the dance hall, which is where Lucy is approached and an appointment is set for an interview which she thinks is for a job (it is, but not a job she is expecting. )

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Just now, sagebrush said:

Yes, there is a scene in the beginning of the film in the dance hall, which is where Lucy is approached and an appointment is set for an interview which she thinks is for a job (it is, but not a job she is expecting. )

So all those scenes of her sitting at a lavish table weren't at the hall then? I must have sneezed and missed it. lol.

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5 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

I didn't get to watch it yet, though I have seen it before. My impressions of the film based on memory was that it seemed a bit too lavish (from it's description as being about a dance hall hostess who acts as a decoy) for a taxi dance barn.

Do we actually ever see Lucy working at her job?  

My lingering memory of this film is Lucy and Sanders sitting at a table that looks like a set of a fancy nightclub. Taxi dance joints were pretty sleazy. I checked one relic out, Majestic Ballroom Dancing, in the mid 60s down on Times Square and if you've seen Killers Kiss or the one depicted in The Rat Race it was the spitting image of those.

Long stairway up to a second story anteroom with a ticket booth, a turnstile to the ballroom proper which looked pretty chintzy, sort of on a high school prom level.  

Maybe in London they had a better image? Anyway I was a bit disappointed with the film which played a bit more like a love story for me anyway.

I'll check out On Demand to catch Eddie's comments.

No offense intended, but suggest you watch the movie as your memory is not too accurate.

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6 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

So all those scenes of her sitting at a lavish table weren't at the hall then? I must have sneezed and missed it. lol.

Yeah, they were in a nightclub in one scene.

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