Barton_Keyes

Noir Alley

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No discussion about the film itself? I'd seen the movie for the first time about a year ago (unsure if it was on Noir Alley or not). Overall a superior B with great dialog. But the movie's big hole: You'd think the police would've known what the mobster looked like and not have been fooled......

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1 minute ago, Hibi said:

No discussion about the film itself? I'd seen the movie for the first time about a year ago (unsure if it was on Noir Alley or not). Overall a superior B with great dialog. But the movie's big hole: You'd think the police would've known what the mobster looked like and not have been fooled......

Early on it is revealed that the police knew the killer as a newspaper reporter, which I guess made for a great cover.  They had no idea he was a mobster.

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7 minutes ago, TheCid said:

Early on it is revealed that the police knew the killer as a newspaper reporter, which I guess made for a great cover.  They had no idea he was a mobster.

I missed that. WHY would a newspaper reporter become a killer?  You'd think they'd be at least suspicious.

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1 minute ago, Hibi said:

I missed that. WHY would a newspaper reporter become a killer?  You'd think they'd be at least suspicious.

That was something they could have gone into, but didn't.

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I'm a little disappointed that there haven't been many comments here about Woman on the Run. (Yes, a few, but they're pretty short.)

I'd seen this film a bunch of years ago (from a TCM airing, of course) and liked it. I was pleased that it was being shown on Noir Alley, and made a point of watching it.

So, yes I'm glad to say, I liked it this time around even better than my first viewing. It's pretty engaging, keeping an almost non-stop pace. I really enjoy all those San Francisco settings- especially the Chinese night-club. And even more, the amusement park. Ok, Eddie says that the amusement park setting is actually not San Francisco, but Pacific Ocean Park in Santa Monica. Wherever, I love it. I love movies, especially noirs, with amusement park scenes (Lady from Shanghai, The Burglar, Dark Corner, many others...) Anyway, what a great place for the final scene in this exciting film. It's funny to watch poor Ann Sheridan having to whip not once, but twice, through that roller coaster ride ! You wonder if it's not all acting, if Ann is really getting a bit sick from the ride. 

But the most interesting thing about Woman on the Run isn't its great on-location settings, nor is it the action, nor the 180-degree turn in the plot (SPOILER !  There's a real twist right at the end, but I always think that even to say "there's a twist" in a film, even if you don't say what the twist is, is in itself a kind of spoiler....)  No, by far the most intriguing aspect to this neat little noir is the examination of a marriage gone sour. Not via some Bergmanesque dialogue, but via Ann's search for her husband through the streets of San Francisco (sorry, couldn't resist - and no, Karl Malden is not to be seen anywhere....), and how, through various conversations she has with people who knew her husband, who worked with him or talked with him in the bar he liked to go to, or treated his medical condition, she gradually discovers that there is much more to this man than she'd realized,that she'd allowed disappointment in his desired career as an artist to come between them. 

You can infer from small things - the tone in her voice when she talks about her husband to the police, the hard expression on the face of a manniquin he'd designed, a face that resembles his wife - that these two people have stopped communicating with each other and more or less given up on their marriage without ever really having tried to talk about what went wrong and whether they could fix it. I love the way Ann's character gets to know her husband all over again in the course of her search for him.

My only complaint about the film is a trivial one; I like Ann Sheridan a lot. She was still fairly young when she made Woman on the Run, and she's still lovely. But for some reason, instead of her usual glossy mane, they give her a matronly shorter hairstyle in this film, which does not really suit her and makes her look older than her 35 years.

Ann's co-star throughout most of the movie is Dennis O'Keefe. He's quite good in his role as the reporter intent on getting a story from Ann (SPOILER !  NOT !) and whoever did the casting for him and the actor who plays Ann's husband, (Ross Elliott), did a great job, as there's a bit of a physical resemblance between the two men, which you discover is a significant part of the plot.

Anyway, I thought this was a highly enjoyable little noir, and I thank Eddie Muller for "resurrecting" it. (Good choice for Easter Sunday !)

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15 minutes ago, Hibi said:

No discussion about the film itself? I'd seen the movie for the first time about a year ago (unsure if it was on Noir Alley or not). Overall a superior B with great dialog. But the movie's big hole: You'd think the police would've known what the mobster looked like and not have been fooled......

Coincidental timing, Hibi! I just wrote a longish post about it one minute ago !

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25 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

My only complaint about the film is a trivial one; I like Ann Sheridan a lot. She was still fairly young when she made Woman on the Run, and she's still lovely. But for some reason, instead of her usual glossy mane, they give her a matronly shorter hairstyle in this film, which does not really suit her and makes her look older than her 35 years.

 

I think Eddie may have alluded to this as possibly a choice by Sheridan.  He did point out that she wore the same shapeless overcoat throughout most of the movie.  I think Sheridan wanted to show that while she was beyond the "hot" young role, she could still act and deserved more roles. 

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This is the second time that I've watched Woman on the Run.  I liked it more the second go around as well.  I'm a big Ann Sheridan fan, I'll watch anything that she appears in.  I'll agree with MissWonderly's comments re: Ann's hair.  It's unfortunate that she was forced to don the Ethel Mertz 'do in this film--especially after Eddie Muller having shared glamorous photos of Ann during his introduction.  The Ethel Mertz hair looked fine on Vivian Vance, as it made her a little frumpy and contrasted nicely with star Lucille Ball, but even Vance looked better at the end of the series when she grew her hair out.  Ann was only 35 in Woman on the Run and she easily looked 10 years older.  

I'll also agree with MissWonderly's assessment of Woman on the Run being an interesting study on a marriage gone South.  Ann is rather indifferent to husband Elliot Reid, she doesn't even know about his heart condition! If you are unaware of your spouse's health issues, your marriage is really on the rocks.  I think it's interesting to learn about more and more facets of their relationship as Ann tries to find her husband.  They were really in love in the beginning and then, seemingly grew apart.  Perhaps it's the transition into normal, humdrum life after the excitement of the dating and honeymoon stages are over.  Ann grew bored of her husband.  Her husband probably grew bored of her as well.

I also love movies that feature amusement park scenes and I love noir that features real, on location footage.  As someone who has been to modern San Francisco a few times, the difference between 1949/1950 San Francisco and 2010s San Francisco is night and day.  While the layout and look of the city is the same, there is so much less traffic.  Less people. Less homeless population.  Everything.  The look at 1949/1950 San Francisco almost looks idyllic.  People could actually afford to live there! It was just a blue collar port city.

I thought Dennis O'Keefe made an excellent pairing with Ann.  I loved the rapport they had with one another and their banter.  SPOILER!! I thought the twists were interesting, like when Ann asked Dennis his name and he casually said his name was Daniel Legget, but his friends call him "Danny Boy."  The audience will remember that the victim at the beginning of the film is assaulted and murdered by a "Danny Boy."  Ann is unaware of his real identity, but as the audience, having this knowledge adds a layer of suspense.

I thought Elliott Reid was great and I immediately recognized him as the director from Lucy Ricardo's Vitameatavegamin commercial in I Love Lucy.  Robert Keith, who played the police inspector, was Brian Keith's father.

This was a great film and I enjoyed hearing the background as to how Eddie Muller's Film Noir Foundation found this film and with UCLA, restored it.  I also thought Eddie disclosing how he saved Woman on the Run was funny, even if some piracy was involved.  Sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do if it'll serve the greater good.  

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17 hours ago, TheCid said:

I think Eddie may have alluded to this as possibly a choice by Sheridan.  He did point out that she wore the same shapeless overcoat throughout most of the movie.  I think Sheridan wanted to show that while she was beyond the "hot" young role, she could still act and deserved more roles. 

Cid's referring to a comment I made about Ann Sheridan's unbecoming hairdo in Woman on the Run.

I get what you're saying, Cid, that maybe Ann had made a considered decision to disguise her attractiveness, being tired of the way she was always flaunted in Warner Brothers movies as a sexy young dame. However, that doesn't mean she had to give up entirely on her looks ! She could have continued to wear that oversize belted coat, which, as Eddie mentioned, she wears throughout the film, which completely covers her shapely figure. 

But there's a difference between not wanting to be sexualized on the screen, and choosing to look ten years older than you are. If it was Ann's own decision to go with that "Ethel Mertz" hairdo, I still think it was a mistake.

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I guess I'm in the minority, but I didn't find Sheridan's doo unflattering, just different. It was the 50's and she couldn't stick with her 40's styles forever.

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Has anyone seen the 50s version of M?? Am looking forward to it.

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1 hour ago, Hibi said:

Has anyone seen the 50s version of M?? Am looking forward to it.

I've never seen it! I'm curious about the casting of David Wayne in the Peter Lorre role.  It should be interesting.

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Yes. David Losey directed it. Parts of it filmed in the old Bunker Hill neighborhood.

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

I've never seen it! I'm curious about the casting of David Wayne in the Peter Lorre role.  It should be interesting.

David Wayne does a very good job but of course he plays the role much differently than Lorre.

My standard advise for watching a 'remake' is to try one's best to treat it as a stand-alone film.  I.e. while watching it try NOT to make comparisons between the films,  the performances etc....

(but yea,  easier said than done).

 

 

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I watched the '51 M fairly recently. I thought it was decent (I gave it a 6/10), but I know some people around here were crazy about it. It was odd seeing Wayne in that sort of role. I consider the original German version one of the best films of the 1930's, and feel the material is best suited to that specific time and place.

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4 hours ago, Hibi said:

Has anyone seen the 50s version of M?? Am looking forward to it.

Yea, makes use of Angels Flight and the Bradbury building, and mannequins if I remember right, it was watchable.  

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Sorry. I've been MIA for awhile. I just checked the schedule and didn't see a Noir Alley film for this weekend (4/28-4/29). Did I miss something or is Eddie just taking a break?

Thanks

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2 minutes ago, Hoganman1 said:

Sorry. I've been MIA for awhile. I just checked the schedule and didn't see a Noir Alley film for this weekend (4/28-4/29). Did I miss something or is Eddie just taking a break?

Thanks

It's M (1951), as mentioned in the several posts above yours.

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 Who else corresponds with Eddie Muller?

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9 hours ago, Hibi said:

Has anyone seen the 50s version of M?? Am looking forward to it.

Yes, I like it about as much as the Fritz Lang original. Love the location shots in LA and the utilization of the Bradbury Building.

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On 4/23/2019 at 7:52 PM, speedracer5 said:

This is the second time that I've watched Woman on the Run.  I liked it more the second go around as well.  I'm a big Ann Sheridan fan, I'll watch anything that she appears in.  I'll agree with MissWonderly's comments re: Ann's hair.  It's unfortunate that she was forced to don the Ethel Mertz 'do in this film--especially after Eddie Muller having shared glamorous photos of Ann during his introduction.  The Ethel Mertz hair looked fine on Vivian Vance, as it made her a little frumpy and contrasted nicely with star Lucille Ball, but even Vance looked better at the end of the series when she grew her hair out.  Ann was only 35 in Woman on the Run and she easily looked 10 years older.  

I'll also agree with MissWonderly's assessment of Woman on the Run being an interesting study on a marriage gone South.  Ann is rather indifferent to husband Elliot Reid, she doesn't even know about his heart condition! If you are unaware of your spouse's health issues, your marriage is really on the rocks.  I think it's interesting to learn about more and more facets of their relationship as Ann tries to find her husband.  They were really in love in the beginning and then, seemingly grew apart.  Perhaps it's the transition into normal, humdrum life after the excitement of the dating and honeymoon stages are over.  Ann grew bored of her husband.  Her husband probably grew bored of her as well.

I also love movies that feature amusement park scenes and I love noir that features real, on location footage.  As someone who has been to modern San Francisco a few times, the difference between 1949/1950 San Francisco and 2010s San Francisco is night and day.  While the layout and look of the city is the same, there is so much less traffic.  Less people. Less homeless population.  Everything.  The look at 1949/1950 San Francisco almost looks idyllic.  People could actually afford to live there! It was just a blue collar port city.

I thought Dennis O'Keefe made an excellent pairing with Ann.  I loved the rapport they had with one another and their banter.  SPOILER!! I thought the twists were interesting, like when Ann asked Dennis his name and he casually said his name was Daniel Legget, but his friends call him "Danny Boy."  The audience will remember that the victim at the beginning of the film is assaulted and murdered by a "Danny Boy."  Ann is unaware of his real identity, but as the audience, having this knowledge adds a layer of suspense.

I thought Elliott Reid was great and I immediately recognized him as the director from Lucy Ricardo's Vitameatavegamin commercial in I Love Lucy.  Robert Keith, who played the police inspector, was Brian Keith's father.

This was a great film and I enjoyed hearing the background as to how Eddie Muller's Film Noir Foundation found this film and with UCLA, restored it.  I also thought Eddie disclosing how he saved Woman on the Run was funny, even if some piracy was involved.  Sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do if it'll serve the greater good.  

Liked your write-up here, speedy.

However, and while I probably shouldn't mention the following, and only because you twice misidentified/misnamed the actor who played Ann Sheridan's husband in Woman of the Run, I've felt compelled to correct you on this.

As you most likely really know, the actor who played her husband in this film, and the actor as you correctly remembered who played the commercial director in the classic Vitameatavegamin I Live Lucy episode was Ross Elliott, not Eliot Reid.

(...although, I can plainly see how you could have confused these two actors, as not only do they sort of share a similar name and somewhat resemble each other in a fairly nondescript "average white male" manner, but also that both of these actors would never make much of an indelible impression upon the silver screen in their careers, either) 

Eliot Reid

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Ross Elliott

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