Barton_Keyes

Noir Alley

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"Whata ya mean Johnny Rocco's tougher than me?"

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"Whata mean Ma Jarrett's the best I can get?"

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"I don't care what you say. You look like Sam Spade to me!"

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A young Cody Jarrett telling Rocco he just met a girl named Verna

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A three way with Cody and Rocco. There ain't enough booze in the ocean.

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Wish I could keep up the fun, but I'm just going to mention the movie real quick and get out. ;)

KEY LARGO (1948).  I actually saw this film for the first time last year.  This was the fourth time I've seen it since and I've liked it more each time.  I would say it is actually one of Bogart's less than outstanding performances, but that has nothing to do with his performance and more to do with the fact that he is overshadowed by standouts.  Claire Trevor, Barrymore, and Robinson steal the show.  I would also say Lauren Bacall is just okay.  She gets the job done, but there isn't much that is memorable about her character.  She has a lot more to work with in THE BIG SLEEP (1946) and DARK PASSAGE (1947).  But the fact that Bogart and Bacall don't steal the show doesn't hinder this film one bit.  Definitely glad to stay up late last night and watch it again.

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I hate to think of what kind of punishment Rocco is dealing out to a gang member here.

MV5BMjE3Mzk2MTYzMF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTYwNDIx

 

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4 hours ago, Looney said:

Wish I could keep up the fun, but I'm just going to mention the movie real quick and get out. ;)

KEY LARGO (1948).  I actually saw this film for the first time last year.  This was the fourth time I've seen it since and I've liked it more each time.  I would say it is actually one of Bogart's less than outstanding performances, but that has nothing to do with his performance and more to do with the fact that he is overshadowed by standouts.  Claire Trevor, Barrymore, and Robinson steal the show.  I would also say Lauren Bacall is just okay.  She gets the job done, but there isn't much that is memorable about her character.  She has a lot more to work with in THE BIG SLEEP (1946) and DARK PASSAGE (1947).  But the fact that Bogart and Bacall don't steal the show doesn't hinder this film one bit.  Definitely glad to stay up late last night and watch it again.

I admired Bogart's restrained performance. He was content with fourth fiddle and didn't seem to mind. He allowed himself to be slapped without going into a rage or even issuing threats. Maybe they gave him downers before his scenes, ha.

Lauren never did much for me, anyway.

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I've seen KEY LARGO many times, but always enjoy watching it again. I agree with Looney that there are so many great performances by the co-stars that Bogart and Bacall don't really have to do much. Also John Huston was one of my favorite directors of that era. I think the main attraction of this film for me is the exotic location. I was surprised when Eddie said that all the inside shots were done in Hollywood. Like with Rick's Cafe in CASABLANCA, I've always wanted to spend a weekend at The Hotel Largo. However, not during hurricane season.

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1 hour ago, Hoganman1 said:

I've seen KEY LARGO many times, but always enjoy watching it again. I agree with Looney that there are so many great performances by the co-stars that Bogart and Bacall don't really have to do much. Also John Huston was one of my favorite directors of that era. I think the main attraction of this film for me is the exotic location. I was surprised when Eddie said that all the inside shots were done in Hollywood. Like with Rick's Cafe in CASABLANCA, I've always wanted to spend a weekend at The Hotel Largo. However, not during hurricane season.

Check out Transitional Noir All Fall Down (1962) lots of great Key West locations.

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2 hours ago, Hoganman1 said:

I've seen KEY LARGO many times, but always enjoy watching it again. I agree with Looney that there are so many great performances by the co-stars that Bogart and Bacall don't really have to do much. Also John Huston was one of my favorite directors of that era. I think the main attraction of this film for me is the exotic location. I was surprised when Eddie said that all the inside shots were done in Hollywood. Like with Rick's Cafe in CASABLANCA, I've always wanted to spend a weekend at The Hotel Largo. However, not during hurricane season.

I have a DVD of old Greyhound bus lines ads and shorts.  One mentions some of the Greyhound Post House restaurants and hotels.  One had scenes on Greyhound Key en route to Key West.  I think someone bought it as a private residence after Greyhound gave up on it.

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3 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Check out Transitional Noir All Fall Down (1962) lots of great Key West locations.

We actually visited Key West years ago and it felt like a foreign country. One of the highlights was touring Hemingway's house. I wonder if the cats are still there. Supposedly, they were descendants of Papa Hemingway's pets. Also, all the counters in the kitchen were custom built to accommodate his height. 

I'll check out ALL FALL DOWN.  

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1 hour ago, Hoganman1 said:

We actually visited Key West years ago and it felt like a foreign country. One of the highlights was touring Hemingway's house. I wonder if the cats are still there. Supposedly, they were descendants of Papa Hemingway's pets. Also, all the counters in the kitchen were custom built to accommodate his height. 

I'll check out ALL FALL DOWN.  

Sorry Hoganman, but with Hemingway being about 6 foot in height, I have to ask why those counters would have had to have been custom-made?

 

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On 5/14/2019 at 11:55 PM, speedracer5 said:

I'm reading Nightmare Alley right now! So far, the beginning of the story is much different than the movie.  I also look forward to reading Thieves Like Us.  I loved They Live By Night

Is it the unabridged version in that collection? I've read a number of novels that were eventually made into Film Noir. I've noticed that the Mass Market Paperback version of Cornell Woolrich's Deadline At Dawn excises a lot of the descriptive passages compared to the un-abridged version. It's not like they always are removing whole paragraphs (which they do in spots), a lot of times it's just a sentence or two out of a paragraph.

In the unabridged version of Deadline At Dawn you can actually trace on a map of Manhattan where the characters are going in their search.

My Signet Books print below is a 1949 print two years after the film premiered.

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You can see the cover art was influenced by the film from the similarity of Molly/Electra's costume.

This copy is 213 pages long and the print is small and there are 46 lines per page. It also has each chapter titled with a different tarot card.

PS Gresham also wrote a nonfiction treatment about carnivals in 

 61mYQcrmzbL._SX341_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

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5 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

...PS Gresham also wrote a nonfiction treatment about carnivals in 

 61mYQcrmzbL._SX341_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

So CJ. Did Gresham have to get the approval from George Halas and/or anyone from the Chicago Bears organization to use that title for his book?

(...just wonderin')

;)

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On 5/19/2019 at 10:49 PM, Dargo said:

Sorry Hoganman, but with Hemingway being about 6 foot in height, I have to ask why those counters would have had to have been custom-made?

 

Maybe I'm wrong, but I thought that's what the guide told us. 

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Re Nightmare Alley:

In deference to TomJH and speedracer5 who are currently reading the novel,

I'm going to print here for the rest of Noir Alley's fans, the way the final seance went wrong as opposed to how it had to be handled in the film under the Hayes/Motion Picture Production Code.   

So I'd suggest TomJH and speedracer5 not read anymore below or any responses to the text from Gresham's novel.

Notebene, I've added ellipsis to where I edited some sentences out, but you'll get the jist of it.

 

Now this below is Nightmare Alley

 

When night had come there was a tap on the door and Carlisle entered carrying in both hands a votive candle in a cup of red ruby glass. "lets go to the chapel."

      Grindle had never seen that room before.... the entire room was hung in folds of dark drapery. If there were any windows they were covered.

     The clergyman led his disciple to the divian; taking his hand he pressed him back against the cushions. "You are at peace. Rest, rest."

     Grindle felt foggy and vague. The bowl of jasmine tea which he had been given for supper had seemed bitter. Now his head was swimming lightly and reality retreated to arm's length.....

     Carlisle was chanting something which sounded like Sanskrit, then a brief prayer in English which reminded Grindle of the marriage service; but somehow the words refused to fit together in his mind.....

     They waited.

     From far away, from hundreds of miles it seemed came the sound of wind, a great rushing wind or the beating of giant wings. Then it died and there arose the soft tinkling notes of a sitar.....

     Ghostly music began again. From the curtains before the alcove a light flashed, then a sinuous coil of glowing vapor poured from between them, lying in a pool of mist close to the floor. It swelled and seemed to foam from the cabinet in a cascade....

     The pool of luminous matter began to take form. It swayed as a cocoon might sway from a moth's emerging. It became a cocoon holding something dark in it's center. Then it split and drew back toward the cabinet, revealing the form of a girl, lying on a bed of light, but illuminated only by the stuff around her. She was naked, her head resting on one bent arm.

     Grindle sank to his knees. "Dorrie-Dorrie-"

     She opened her eyes, sat up and then rose, modestly drawing a film of glowing mist over her body. The old man groped forward awkwardly, reaching up to her. As he drew near, the luminous cloud fell back and vanished. The girl stood white and tall, in the flicker of the votive candle across the room, and as she gazed down at him her hair fell over her face.

     "Dorrie-my pet-my honey love-my bride..."

     He picked her up in his arms, overjoyed at the complete materialization, at the lifelike smoothness of her body-she was so heartbreakingly earthly.

     Inside the cabinet the Rev. Carlisle was busy packing yards of luminous-painted China  silk back into the hem of the curtains. Once he put his eye to the opening and his lips drew back over his teeth. Why did people look so filthy and ridiculous to anyone watching? Christ!

     The second time in his life he had seen it. Filth.

     The bride and bridegroom were motionless now.

     It was up to Molly to break away and get back to the cabinet. Stan turned the switch and the rhythmic, pounding heartbeat filled the room, growing louder. He tossed one end of the luminous silk through the curtains.

     The quiet forms on the divan stirred, and Stan could see the big man burrowing his face between Molly's breasts. "no-Dorrie-my own, my precious-I can't let you go! Take me with you, Dorrie-I don't want earth life without you..."

     She struggled out of his arms; but the bridegroom seized her around the waste, rubbing his forehead against her belly.

     Stan grabbed the aluminum trumpet. "Ezra-my beloved disciple-have courage. He must return to us. The force is growing weaker. In the city-"

     No! Dorrie-I must-I-once more..."

     This time another voice answered him. It was not a spiritual voice. It was the voice of a panicky showgirl who has more than she can handle. "Hey, quit it, for God's sake! Stan! Stan! Stan!

     Oh the dumb b*i*t*c*h!

     The Rev. Carlisle tore the curtains apart. Molly was twisting and kicking; the old man was like one possessed. In his pent-up soul the dam had broken, and the sedative Stan had loaded into his tea had worn off.

    Grindle clutched the squirming girl until she was jerked from his hands.

     "Stan! For God's sake get me out of here! Get me out!"

     Grindle stood paralyzed. For in the dim flickering light he saw the face of his spiritual mentor, the Rev. Stanton Carlisle, it was snarling. Then a fist came up and landed on the chin of the spirit bride. She dropped to the floor, knees gaping obscenely.

     Now the hideous face was shouting at Grindle himself. "You goddamned hypocrite! Forgiveness? All you wanted was a girl!" Knuckles smashed his cheekbone and Grindle bounced back on the divian.

 

 

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15 hours ago, mr6666 said:

Noir AlleyVerified account @NoirAlley May 21

 

Lizabeth Scott and Humphrey Bogart star in John Cromwell's DEAD RECKONING ('47),

this week on #NoirAlley hosted by @EddieMuller

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I like this movie more than many of Bogart's.  I think he and Scott do a great job in it.  Marvin Miller plays Krause and is probably better known for his role in TV's The Millionaire

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Dead Reckoning is gorgeously photographed. I hope Eddie Muller will talk about that some. The story is full of familiar noir elements, but the direction, the cinematography, and the two stars make up for the somewhat predictable script. Perhaps John Cromwell's best film.

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6 hours ago, kingrat said:

Dead Reckoning is gorgeously photographed. I hope Eddie Muller will talk about that some. The story is full of familiar noir elements, but the direction, the cinematography, and the two stars make up for the somewhat predictable script. Perhaps John Cromwell's best film.

and yet, it almost reads like a meta-parody of a genre that had yet to (perhaps) be defined (at least in the eyes of critics)

although God forbid i say anything to fan that debate again...

in re: DEAD RECKONING, i think they were meaning to be slightly tongue in cheek about it...

It is also (I think I have mentioned this before) one of those films where LIZABETH SCOTT'S CHARACTER shows up "INCOGNITO" at a nightclub and some maitre'd comes over and is all "and tonight we have with us, MISS [WHATEVER] folks, you think we can get her to sing us a song???!" and they put a spot on her and Liz puts out her cigarette (or not, maybe, knowing her) and proceeds to lip sync the HELL out of something (THAT OLD BLACK MAGIC...maybe?).

I love it.

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On 5/22/2019 at 3:17 AM, cigarjoe said:

Is it the unabridged version in that collection? I've read a number of novels that were eventually made into Film Noir. I've noticed that the Mass Market Paperback version of Cornell Woolrich's Deadline At Dawn excises a lot of the descriptive passages compared to the un-abridged version. It's not like they always are removing whole paragraphs (which they do in spots), a lot of times it's just a sentence or two out of a paragraph.

I think it's unabridged? It's about 200-ish pages long within the anthology.

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I also posted this in Hits and Misses, but wanted Noir Alley fans to see this as well. I haven't seen Pale Flower, to be shown Sunday night on TCM Imports, but this is what a noirista friend had to say about it:

Pale Flower(Masahiro Shinoda 1964) –The greatest Japanese film noir? It is certainly my favorite, and among my five favorites regardless of national origin. Perhaps the rarest of the rare is an art-house film noir. This is that. Everything is in place, from the voice-over narration to open and close the film, compositions that make me want to stop the movie every other frame, the Yakuza hit man fresh from three years in prison, and the mysterious woman-child who seemingly adds a new dimension to the hit man’s existence. Plus a phenomenal score by Toru Takemitsu interspersed with popular songs, one of which, “O Sole Mio,” sums up the film. The hit man’s initial narration informs us that nothing has changed during his three years in prison. The film soon tells us that, although there is a new truce between two of the gangs, he is correct – if anything has changed, it is tangential to his life, a life of alienation and perversity. Even the woman’s entrance into his life makes only a temporary change as she willfully participates in his experiences in an attempt to overcome her boredom.  But none of that matters. Nothing matters. Not even her existence.  Ennui noirhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oOOr4nuWFqUWith Ryo Ikebe & Mariko Kaga. A must-see. Oh, boy, is it A must-see.

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On 5/24/2019 at 4:23 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

and yet, it almost reads like a meta-parody of a genre that had yet to (perhaps) be defined (at least in the eyes of critics)

although God forbid i say anything to fan that debate again...

in re: DEAD RECKONING, i think they were meaning to be slightly tongue in cheek about it...

It is also (I think I have mentioned this before) one of those films where LIZABETH SCOTT'S CHARACTER shows up "INCOGNITO" at a nightclub and some maitre'd comes over and is all "and tonight we have with us, MISS [WHATEVER] folks, you think we can get her to sing us a song???!" and they put a spot on her and Liz puts out her cigarette (or not, maybe, knowing her) and proceeds to lip sync the HELL out of something (THAT OLD BLACK MAGIC...maybe?).

I love it.

LOL

lizabeth_scott_dead_reckoning-07.png

"Look kiddo. Not ONLY do I lip-sync the hell out'a that "Either It's Love Or It Isn't" number, but I ALSO look absolutely FABULOUS and without a SINGLE laceration on this face of mine after going through that Lincoln Continental's windshield and while lying here in this hospital bed waiting to die at the end of this baby TOO!"

(...oh wait...should I have supplied a "spoiler alert" here first???...yeah, maybe I should have, huh...eeeh, screw it)

 

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