Barton_Keyes

Noir Alley

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4 hours ago, cmovieviewer said:

Leaving a reminder here that because of the Doris Day memorial tribute this coming Sunday June 9, the late Saturday June 8 showing of Noir Alley with the film Nora Prentiss (1947) is the only showing we get this week.  (WatchTCM might be the remaining hope if you miss it.)

Thanks, I'll have to record it Saturday night.

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An ambitious doctor ruins a singer's life. Oops. I haven't seen this one in a while so I'll be

watching. I never watch the Sunday morning edition, too early in the day. Kent Smith

carved out a niche as mr. average guy who gets into various difficulties, like marrying a

woman who thinks she's a panther. 

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1 hour ago, Vautrin said:

An ambitious doctor ruins a singer's life. Oops. I haven't seen this one in a while so I'll be

watching. I never watch the Sunday morning edition, too early in the day. Kent Smith

carved out a niche as mr. average guy who gets into various difficulties, like marrying a

woman who thinks she's a panther. 

Actually Vautrin, don't forget here that there are TWO actors in Nora Prentiss who very often had roles like this in the movies back in the day!

Uh-huh...Bruce Bennett is in this baby TOO! ;)

(...ain't it a shame they couldn't have somehow fit Wendell Corey into this thing, 'cause THEN you'd have the "Trifecta" of these sort'a guys ALL in one film!!!) LOL

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

Actually Vautrin, don't forget here that there are TWO actors in Nora Prentiss who very often had roles like this in the movies back in the day!

Uh-huh...Bruce Bennett is in this baby TOO! ;)

(...ain't it a shame they couldn't have somehow fit Wendell Corey into this thing, 'cause THEN you'd have the "Trifecta" of these sort'a guys ALL in one film!!!) LOL

No respect at all. It's tough out there, Johnny. Bennett also had a very distinctive voice. When he

appeared in TV shows from the 1960s I usually recognize the voice first. 

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17 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

No respect at all. It's tough out there, Johnny. Bennett also had a very distinctive voice. When he

appeared in TV shows from the 1960s I usually recognize the voice first. 

Wow! Didn't know you were such a big Herman Brix..ahem..I mean, Bruce Bennett fan here, V' ol' boy?!!!

(...so, how do ya feel about Byron Barr..ahem..I mean Gig Young here, dude?) ;)

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6 hours ago, Dargo said:

Wow! Didn't know you were such a big Herman Brix..ahem..I mean, Bruce Bennett fan here, V' ol' boy?!!!

(...so, how do ya feel about Byron Barr..ahem..I mean Gig Young here, dude?) ;)

Yes, Brix is not for kids. You have to be an adult to fully appreciate BB. I'm not a huge fan though I

enjoy most of his roles. He does turn up on a number of TV shows from the 1960s. I remember

him most from The Treasure of the Sierra Madre where the three amigos are about to plug ol'

Bruce when they are interrupted by gold hat and his buddies who do the job for them. Like a

lot of actors, I neither dislike or like Gig Young. He was effective in a certain type of role.

 

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37 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

Yes, Brix is not for kids. You have to be an adult to fully appreciate BB. I'm not a huge fan though I

enjoy most of his roles. He does turn up on a number of TV shows from the 1960s. I remember

him most from The Treasure of the Sierra Madre where the three amigos are about to plug ol'

Bruce when they are interrupted by gold hat and his buddies who do the job for them. Like a

lot of actors, I neither dislike or like Gig Young. He was effective in a certain type of role.

 

I think my favorite BB role is his turn as Bogie's fellow tank soldier in 1943's Sahara, and where poor Bruce volunteers to cross the desert on foot to find help.

Loved your "Brix is not for kids" line, btw! LOL Good one!

(...and re your line, "I neither dislike or like Gig Young. He was effective in a certain type of role"...well yeah, and that "certain type of role" for Gig would often be the very same type of role that the aforementioned BB, Kent Smith and Wendell Corey would play...average guys who hardly ever "got the girl" by the film's end)

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

I think my favorite BB role is his turn as Bogie's fellow tank soldier in 1943's Sahara, and where poor Bruce is asked to cross the desert on foot to find help.

(...and re your line, "I neither dislike or like Gig Young. He was effective in a certain type of role"...well yeah, and that "certain type of role" for Gig would often be the very same type of role that the aforementioned BB, Kent Smith and Wendell Corey would play...average guys who hardly ever "got the girl" by the film's end)

Yep, Sahara was a good picture and BB was good in it. I think Young was a bit more of the matinee

idol type, at least more so than guys like BB, Kent Smith or Wendell Corey. After all these years I

find it hard to get too excited about many of the stars of the studio era, though I appreciate their

various talents.

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18 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

Yep, Sahara was a good picture and BB was good in it. I think Young was a bit more of the matinee

idol type, at least more so than guys like BB, Kent Smith or Wendell Corey. After all these years I

find it hard to get too excited about many of the stars of the studio era, though I appreciate their

various talents.

Yeah, even though Gig would often play the second male lead back in the day, and like BB, KS and WC would in most cases, however contrary to those other three, and perhaps because Gig seemed a little more adept at occasionally playing in lighter comic roles than those other three who in my view seemed to primarily play their parts in a more "dour"(for want of a better word) and no-nonsense fashion, I think this might also differentiate Gig from the other three a bit. 

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

Yeah, even though Gig would often play the second male lead back in the day, and like BB, KS and WC would in most cases, however contrary to those other three, and perhaps because Gig seemed a little more adept at occasionally playing in lighter comic roles than those other three who in my view seemed to primarily play their parts in a more "dour"(for want of a better word) and no-nonsense fashion, I think this might also differentiate Gig from the other three a bit. 

Of course this is based on my imperfect memory and not any detailed look at Gig

Young's filmography. He seemed to be closer to having some success with the ladies

than the other three. Bennett and Smith seemed to me to be sort of middle of the road

types personality wise where I see Corey as mostly dour even when he's playing a good

guy. He doesn't seem to crack a big smile that often and he also played the villain every

once in a while. Carry on, gentlemen.

 

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On 6/4/2019 at 3:01 PM, misswonderly3 said:

i don't know about that, Hoganman. Not to be disagreeable, but all three of the movies you name are about Mafia gangsters. There was no Mafia involvement in Asphalt Jungle.

I see the two films (and also The Sopranos) as being stories about the Mafia in American, the lifestyle, the values, the power plays. Asphalt Jungle had a much smaller story (albeit a really good one) - just about some guys, not even really connected  to each other (unlike the characters in The Godfather, Goodfellas, and The Sopranos) until "Cobby" brings them together, under the leadership of "Doc" (Sam Jaffe). In fact, I don't think any of them were even Italian (well, Italian-American.)

It's a classic "heist" movie- much different from Scorsese's Mafia stories and the great TV series from David Chase.

I think you missed my point. You're right it wasn't a Mafia movie. My comparison was that all the main stars were the criminals. I guess WHITE HEAT and HIGH SIERRA would fit as well as LITTLE CAESAR and ROARING TWENTIES. Before Noir, it seemed to me that in most movies the star was a "good guy" not a criminal.

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Nice copy of Nora Prentiss on Noir Alley last night. Better than I remember watching before.

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I'm disappointed that there's no Noir Alley this morning. I didn't record NORA PRENTISS last night. Maybe I can catch it On Demand. I've never seen it.

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On 6/4/2019 at 11:03 AM, Dargo said:

two-photos-vibr50-b10-c10-resize.jpg?w=6

He was 65, she 32, when they married in 1956.

Word was it was a very happy union for 28 years until Jaffe's death in 1984.

And with perhaps one reason for this being that it was said Bettye never made Sam feel obligated to supply her with a bunch of nickels for a jukebox in order for him to enjoy watching her shake her booty around the house.

(...sorry, couldn't resist)

I remember Bettye Ackerman from Ben Casey. She was from South Carolina. Her brother, Dr. Robert Ackerman was a history professor at a small liberal arts college in South Carolina named Erskine College.I attended Erskine from 1968 until graduating in 1972. As a history major, I had several classes with Dr. Ackerman. He was a wonderful teacher.                     

 I understand Ms. Ackerman returned to South Carolina a few years after her husband (Jaffe) died. She passed away in 2006 at the age of 82.

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1 hour ago, Hoganman1 said:

I'm disappointed that there's no Noir Alley this morning. I didn't record NORA PRENTISS last night. Maybe I can catch it On Demand. I've never seen it.

If you have access, Nora Prentiss is now available on WatchTCM, complete with Eddie's intro- and post- material.

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

Nice copy of Nora Prentiss on Noir Alley last night. Better than I remember watching before.

REALLY?!?!?!?!  What I saw didn't look great and the sound was terrible.  I was very disappointed with some of the picture quality after Eddie made such a point to mention the work of James Wong Howe.  Maybe it was just my internet connection. 

In the interest of honesty I did fall asleep toward the end.  Thank goodness it showed up on SlingTV's TCM On Demand so I could watch the fifteen minutes I missed this morning.  So it is available ON DEMAND.

NORA PRENTISS (1947) - How depressing!!!!! ;)  I can't say I loved this movie, but I am glad I saw it.  I thought the cast was great.  It was so hard to watch though.  I feel like it ended quite appropriately.  I mean you want to be sympathetic to the leads, but Talbot / Thompson was just kind of pathetic in a realistic sort of way.  I don't think he deserved his fate, but he deserved something.  And Prentiss deserved something as well and I think she got it for most of the movie.

I think one of the best things the movie did was make it so I was able to predict what was going to happen about the time Bailey met his fate, but I had no clue how they were going to twist and turn to get there. 

Eddie mentioned "suspension of disbelief".  The funny part is that he was talking about how it ended when the bigger stretch is what did Nora ever see in Talbot? :lol:

And despite having some picture quality issues I could still tell James Wong Howe's work was great. 

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Quote

REALLY?!?!?!?!  What I saw didn't look great and the sound was terrible.  I was very disappointed with some of the picture quality after Eddie made such a point to mention the work of James Wong Howe

Comparatively speaking, what I saw before was a multi-generational copy on Youtube or something similar, that looked like it was underwater. It was similar to the PD copies of Detour you could find. It could definitely use a better restoration. 

That risque dress that Sheridan wore at the Fisherman's Wharf night club was quite revealing in certain shots on the big HD screen. I didn't notice that is my last viewing..... ;-)

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5 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

That risque dress that Sheridan wore at the Fisherman's Wharf night club was quite revealing in certain shots on the big HD screen. I didn't notice that is my last viewing..... ;-)

AGREED!  :rolleyes: I was very surprised to see she was wearing something like that.

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I recorded it and watched it.  One advantage is being able to pause it and zoom in to see just what they did show.

On the other hand, I did not think the picture quality was all that good.  

As for the movie itself, I like Ann Sheridan, but I just couldn't get into this movie. Guess I am one of those who thinks it is not Noir either.  To me, it was another run of the mill romantic drama/tragedy.  About half-way through I started using the fast forward button.

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Eddie mentioned a turning point in Ann Sheridan's career when she turned down the lead role in Mildred Pierce.  I don't consider myself to be a Joan Crawford superfan, but somehow I think Joan was better suited for the role of down-trodden mother in that film.  Any other thoughts?

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Posted in the wrong thread, so I re-posted where I intended.

I think Ann Sheridan in Woman on the Run is a very good example of what Noir can be and how well she can act.  This is the one where she wears a bulky raincoat for most of the movie - hiding all the oomph.

I looked up Impact and it sounds good.  I think I may have seen it years ago.

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Even taking into account of the rules for the old Hollywood hokum stuff the ending was

laughable. All Talbot's defense attorney had to do to bring in a not guilty verdict was

a) turn up the lights in the courtroom so it didn't look like the nightclubs Sheridan sang

in. b) have his client move closer to the witness stand so an easy ID could be made instead

of trying to do so half a football field away. c) kindly but firmly show the cops how dumb they

were to arrest the guy who was supposedly murdered for having killed himself. Then his

wife wouldn't have had to squint to recognize him. It's also hard to believe Sheridan wouldn't

have told Talbot's story to the authorities no matter how much he wanted to be a martyr or

that Bennett couldn't have figured it out, especially as the patient with the heart problems

disappeared about the same time Talbot did. Even with the nonsensical climax it was an

entertaining flick. I liked how the script had Smith and Sheridan gradually fall in love after

getting to know one another instead of rushing the point, with both of them being somewhat

hesitant to close the deal.  Ann looked very lovely except when she was wearing one of those

awful hats. Bottom line, Kent got a raw deal. 

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7 hours ago, TheCid said:

Posted in the wrong thread, so I re-posted where I intended.

I think Ann Sheridan in Woman on the Run is a very good example of what Noir can be and how well she can act.  This is the one where she wears a bulky raincoat for most of the movie - hiding all the oomph.

I looked up Impact and it sounds good.  I think I may have seen it years ago.

I assume the other Sheridan film you recently watched but didn't think was so good was Nora Prentiss.   I.e. your comment of "but I just couldn't get into this movie".

As for Impact;   not sure why that film is being mentioned but it is a good noir by United Artist.   The cast is interesting with Coburn,  Helen Walker, and Anna May Wong (and the two stars Ella Raines and Donlevy hold their own):  "Critic Gary W. Tooze praised Impact as the quintessential B film: "As far as 'modest' film noirs go, this is one of the best. A simple plot idea is twisted to the max for late 1940s audiences." 

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13 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I assume the other Sheridan film you recently watched but didn't think was so good was Nora Prentiss.   I.e. your comment of "but I just couldn't get into this movie".

As for Impact;   not sure why that film is being mentioned but it is a good noir by United Artist.   The cast is interesting with Coburn,  Helen Walker, and Anna May Wong (and the two stars Ella Raines and Donlevy hold their own):  "Critic Gary W. Tooze praised Impact as the quintessential B film: "As far as 'modest' film noirs go, this is one of the best. A simple plot idea is twisted to the max for late 1940s audiences." 

Impact was mentioned in another thread; Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow (or something like that).  I had responded thinking I was on the Noir Alley thread.  When I realized I had posted an NA comment on another thread, I just copied it to NA.

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