Barton_Keyes

Noir Alley

5,315 posts in this topic

1 minute ago, cigarjoe said:

Yea the scenes¬†down at the old Fulton Fish Market and in DUMBO. You can always tell the Manhattan street scenes are sets for the lack of parked vehicles. It seems as if in Noir Hollywood Manhattan there is always a place to park.¬†ūüė鬆

Always found it interesting how easily cars find a parking place on very crowded streets in the movies and on TV.  Usually right in front of where they are going.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, TheCid said:

Always found it interesting how easily cars find a parking place on very crowded streets in the movies and on TV.  Usually right in front of where they are going.

Movie magic

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, TheCid said:

Always found it interesting how easily cars find a parking place on very crowded streets in the movies and on TV.  Usually right in front of where they are going.

not only that, but all four tires are there and none of them have a boot on when they get back to the car.

ps- or an ANGRY METER MAID played by PAT AST or MARY WURONOV writing out a three-foot long ticket..

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was reminded a bit of The Last Hurrah with an old, near the end of his career attorney taking

the place of an old, near the end of his career politician. And I couldn't believe Spence would be 

dumb enough to write a check to bribe a witness. Of course it was easier for Hodiak to

tear up a check than a big roll of bills.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know what you people are talking about.  I've never been to New York, but I've seen MANY movies that have shown me this is exactly what it looks like.  I think you all got confused.  Some of these scenes were taking place very late at night, after people put all of their cars away in their garages.  :lol: :D :lol:

:P

 

THE PEOPLE AGAINST O'HARA (1951)

I enjoyed this one, but not so much Tracy.  He was okay, but I honestly felt he seemed a bit drunk the whole time.  This might be the first time I wish Eddie hadn't said anything in the prologue.  Maybe the fact that he mentioned Tracy drinking skewed my interpretation.  I don't know.  Moving past that I thought the rest of the cast was fantastic.  I think I liked subdued Ricks (Pat O'Brien) the best.  And say what you will about the setting, I loved a lot of the pictures I saw. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Looney said:

And say what you will about the setting, I loved a lot of the pictures I saw.

I love that cinematography also.

They (the studio sets) still worked in the early fifties but as more and more on location shots became common they start to loose that magic and look like what they were. John Alton could still work that magic. By the sixties though the magic is gone. 

Looney if you want to see a glaring contrast between a studio sets and an on location shots in one film check out The Money Trap. They use suburban L.A. then cut to your typical NYC/Chicago type brownstone looking inner-city and also use the Brousseau Mansion ( which was at 238 S Bunker Hill Ave), but by 1965 the whole Bunker Hill area was almost gone, that Brouseau Mansion may have been all that is left. It's also a good example of a Noir and a Transitional Noir in one film.

The cinematographer on The Money Trap was Paul Vogle who shot Lady in the Lake, High Wall, Scene of the Crime, Black Hand, Dial 1119, The Tall Target, and The Sellout.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I too enjoyed THE PEOPLE AGAINST O'HARA. My maternal grandfather was a lawyer and looked a lot like Spencer Tracy. So he's always been one of my favorites.  I didn't realize this was his only movie that is considered to be noir. I think INHERIT THE WIND is my favorite Tracy film followed closely by BAD DAY AT BLACK ROCK.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Hoganman1 said:

I too enjoyed THE PEOPLE AGAINST O'HARA. My maternal grandfather was a lawyer and looked a lot like Spencer Tracy. So he's always been one of my favorites.  I didn't realize this was his only movie that is considered to be noir. I think INHERIT THE WIND is my favorite Tracy film followed closely by BAD DAY AT BLACK ROCK.

I thought BDABR was also considered a noir. One of those noirs that's not set in a big city and more "sun-baked" than it is dark, but still a noir just the same.

(...it has many of the same elements anyway, and although it's filmed in color)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Dargo said:

I thought BDABR was also considered a noir. One of those noirs that's not set in a big city and more "sun-baked" than it is dark, but still a noir just the same.

(...it has many of the same elements anyway, and although it's filmed in color)

Any film with a returning WWII vet in a I'm-lost-with-little-desire-to-go-on mood,  is a noir to some!

But yea,  many noir themes in BDABR but lacking noir visuals.  

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thought the cinematography by John Alton in The People Against O'Hara was spectacular.  Interesting noir with a great cast  --  Tracy really delivers as do so many Hollywood reliables like Pat O'Brien, John Hodiak and Eduardo Ciannelli. Even better, how can you not love a noir that has a character named "Knuckles Lanzetta" in it?  Maybe I'll name my next dog, Knuckles . . .   

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If only most of While the City Slept were as good as that still. Good cast, not-so-good script. The search for a serial killer is secondary to rivalries at a newspaper. Huh?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This feels like a new one for me but then I saw the glower right at the start and knew I saw it before. It's the kind of look you don't forget.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WHILE THE CITY SLEEPS (1956)

I was disappointed on soooo many levels.  I love Vincent Price and Ida Lupino.  The fact that they were both in this film was about the only highlight.  Definitely feel this is my least favorite Lang film.  I think my big issue is that there is a great plot here and it is relegated to being a subplot.  Focusing on a contest between people I had no interest in really spoiled it.  I don't think they should have focused on the killer, but I didn't really like the people they focused on so it wasn't very interesting.  Somewhere in the middle there is a place where I feel these two plots could have merged better.

Complaints aside I thought most of the performances were really good.  The only disappointing part about Lupino and Price's performances were that they weren't in the film enough.  I haven't seen much of Dana Andrews' work and this film definitely did not inspire me to see more.

After saying all that I think I would watch this again just to see if I misjudged it.  I probably didn't, but who knows?!  It was late on a Saturday night after I'd had a long day.  As of right now the measure is that after I watch a movie with even a hint of Price I immediately have an urge to buy it.  I did not feel that urge when this one was done.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, Looney said:

WHILE THE CITY SLEEPS (1956)

I was disappointed on soooo many levels.  I love Vincent Price and Ida Lupino.  The fact that they were both in this film was about the only highlight.  Definitely feel this is my least favorite Lang film.  I think my big issue is that there is a great plot here and it is relegated to being a subplot.  Focusing on a contest between people I had no interest in really spoiled it.  I don't think they should have focused on the killer, but I didn't really like the people they focused on so it wasn't very interesting.  Somewhere in the middle there is a place where I feel these two plots could have merged better.

Complaints aside I thought most of the performances were really good.  The only disappointing part about Lupino and Price's performances were that they weren't in the film enough.  I haven't seen much of Dana Andrews' work and this film definitely did not inspire me to see more.

After saying all that I think I would watch this again just to see if I misjudged it.  I probably didn't, but who knows?!  It was late on a Saturday night after I'd had a long day.  As of right now the measure is that after I watch a movie with even a hint of Price I immediately have an urge to buy it.  I did not feel that urge when this one was done.

Just for future reference here Looney, three films in which Dana Andrews shines would be The Best Years of Our Lives, Laura and The Ox-Bow Incident. There are a few more, but these three came immediate to my mind.

(...and perhaps the reason he didn't inspire you in this film could be attributed to something Eddie said in his intro of this film, and that being by 1956 and when this Lang film was made, Andrews' alcoholism was really beginning to affect his work)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Looney said:

I haven't seen much of Dana Andrews' work and this film definitely did not inspire me to see more.

Agree with Dargo, for good Noir gotta see Where The Sidewalk Ends, Edge Of Doom, and Fallen Angel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, The Keeper said:

Which makes for good Noir, right?¬†ÔĽŅūüėä

It makes a good Noir more interesting and makes a so-so noir more watchable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Gotta see Where The Sidewalk Ends, Edge Of Doom, and Fallen Angel

Yep, and a young Dana Andrews is very good when he was first starting out in the biz, and even though he's only billed fourth is actually the star of it, would be in french director's Jean Renoir Hollywood era movie Swamp Water.

(...come to think of it, the style and look of this excellent film COULD perhaps define it as a "noir", and even though it's set in the back country of the deep south)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have While The City Sleeps on DVD and was just going to watch Eddie Muller's intro.  So much for plans.  Got sucked into watching it again.  While it may not be a "real" Noir as Eddie mentioned, I like it.  Excellent cast, very well written and absorbing story - or stories if you prefer.

The multiple story lines did not distract for me, but rather made it a better movie.  Less Noir perhaps, but more entertaining.

I did like Eddie's explanation of why he included it in Noir Alley - and I'll buy into it.  His information re: drinking on the set, alcohol problems, comic books, his personal connections and so forth added to enjoying it.  I worked in a drug store in high school and I think I read every comic book we had on the racks - even the romance ones.  When I was in the Army I noticed a lot of enlisted people read comics and left them laying around.  So, I frequently read them as well.  I am not at all attracted to the current comic books or whatever they call them now or animated serious movies.

Andrews was as good here as in any other movie in which I have seen him.  The rest of the cast also performed very well.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Looney said:

WHILE THE CITY SLEEPS (1956)

....Complaints aside I thought most of the performances were really good.  The only disappointing part about Lupino and Price's performances were that they weren't in the film enough.  I haven't seen much of Dana Andrews' work and this film definitely did not inspire me to see more.....

 

You haven't seen much of Dana Andrews' work? Then you haven't seen all that many noirs. Dana Andrews is generally considered one of the iconic noir protagonists. I'll provide a short list at the end of this post. I really like this actor, I think he has a really interesting face,and he's one of those actors who knows how to convey what he's thinking without saying anything. Even in a film I might not be that enthused about, if Mr. Andrews is in it, I'll watch it.

A few Dana Andrews noirs  (I'll leave out all the other great movies he's been in, which are many.)

Laura /  Where the Sidewalk Ends / Fallen Angel  / Ball of Fire (ok,  this is not really a noir, more a comedy with gangsters. But it's a fun movie, and Dana clearly has fun as a bad guy gangster)  /Boomerang / Beyond a Reasonable Doubt

I'll just add, he was the kind of actor who was in many different film genres - quite a few westerns and war movies. And of course, he was wonderful in The Best Years of Our Lives. Check out some of the above titles, maybe you'll change your mind about him.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This must have been the third time, I think, that I've seen While the City Sleeps. I know I've said this before, about other Noir Alley titles, but once again, I enjoyed the film much more on this go-round than the other times I've watched it.

I don't care if a film isn't "noir" enough ...if it's entertaining, then I'm in. And I was entertained by this late Fritz Lang film, mostly by the actors and how they portrayed their characters. As some of you have noted, Vincent Price is always worth watching. There's just something inherently likable - I'll go so far as to say funny, in a good way - about this actor.  Then there's George Sanders, again, always amusing, and as usual, there he is playing a bit of a calculating cad, but a witty and urbane one. Ida Lupino is always good. And compare her performance here to the gentle blind woman we saw recently in On Dangerous Ground (aired a few weeks ago on Noir Alley). True, While the City Sleeps was made four years later, but seeing Ida in both these very different movies shows her range. I love Ida Lupino. And that scene where she tries to seduce Dana Andrews' character is hilarious- theyr'e both so drunk and so cynical and so lustful - but Ed, fortunately, is too drunk to do anything about the lust !  Just as well .

I recognized Sally Forrest as Ed's "nice girl" fiancee, but couldn't say where I'd seen her before. I looked her up, and sure enough, I'd seen her in a few films, usually as a minor character. She's good in While the City Sleeps, and that's very much to her credit, since it's kind of hard playing the straight nice girl when you've got women like Ida Lupino around (who're you going to remember more?)  

Women like Ida Lupino and Rhonda Fleming. Interesting, I'd just seen Rhonda in Cry Danger (I own a copy of it and had just watched it the other night.) I enjoy the way Rhonda always seems to play conniving "bad" women - not really femme fatales, more just deceitful and manipulative. So, does she end up unhappily ever after with husband Vincent Price?  Looks like she dumps her lover Harry to stick with Kyne. Poor James Craig as Rhonda's lover Harry doesn't really get much to do, except wind his arms around Rhonda and sulk when he's criticized. 

Anyway, I found While the City Sleeps quite entertaining, more so than the other times I've watched it. Almost a comedy, actually. Eddie's right, comedy definitely isn't something you associate much with Fritz Lang.  But in WTCS, there's a lot of sharp witty dialogue - and, as I said, I just find a lot of the characters funny in their own right.

Some of you have complained that the film pays more attention to the newspaper rivalry story than the murder story - but that's just it, it's much more about the former than the latter. The murder mystery is really just a McGuffin for the newspaper characters to go at it. And by the way, speaking of the murderer, damn, what was up with Robert Manners, who played the psycho killer? Maybe the hammy-ness of his dad John Barrymore rubbed off on him, because I actually had to laugh at the way he kept snarling and scowling and generally mugging, as though to signal to the audience what a nut case he was. And his shouting at the poor frumpy mother. All wildly over-done. To the point where I found that funny, too (probably the humour I found in that aspect of the film was unintentional.) 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Looney said:

WHILE THE CITY SLEEPS (1956)

I was disappointed on soooo many levels.  I love Vincent Price and Ida Lupino.  The fact that they were both in this film was about the only highlight.  Definitely feel this is my least favorite Lang film.  I think my big issue is that there is a great plot here and it is relegated to being a subplot.  Focusing on a contest between people I had no interest in really spoiled it.  I don't think they should have focused on the killer, but I didn't really like the people they focused on so it wasn't very interesting.  Somewhere in the middle there is a place where I feel these two plots could have merged better.

Complaints aside I thought most of the performances were really good.  The only disappointing part about Lupino and Price's performances were that they weren't in the film enough.  I haven't seen much of Dana Andrews' work and this film definitely did not inspire me to see more.

After saying all that I think I would watch this again just to see if I misjudged it.  I probably didn't, but who knows?!  It was late on a Saturday night after I'd had a long day.  As of right now the measure is that after I watch a movie with even a hint of Price I immediately have an urge to buy it.  I did not feel that urge when this one was done.

I'm also a fan of Ida Lupino. She had a special quality, a kind of rare attractiveness to her. Intelligence and an intriguing facial beauty in combination.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

And by the way, speaking of the murderer, damn, what was up with Robert MannersÔĽŅÔĽŅ, who played the psycho killer?

Robert Manners? I googled the name and only came up with a Royal Navy officer who died in 1782. However, agree that John Drew Barrymore was really hammy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us