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Noir Alley

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12 minutes ago, Hibi said:

And as for the dames in Heat, dont forget Jeanette Nolan, especially nasty as the blackmailing widow. In her older years, she played nice little old ladies, but NOT HERE!

Wasn’t she also in Orson Welles’ MACBETH ?

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What was that other noir with Ford shown not too long ago with Janis Carter, I think it was? i hadnt seen it before, but it was pretty good......

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10 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Wasn’t she also in Orson Welles’ MACBETH ?

I think so.

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5 hours ago, Hibi said:

What was that other noir with Ford shown not too long ago with Janis Carter, I think it was? i hadnt seen it before, but it was pretty good......

 "Framed".

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15 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

 "Framed".

Thanks!

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Just a heads up / reminder that the prime time schedule theme tonight is entitled "Saturday Night Noir," with a salute to the kick-off of the 12 am Eastern time additional showings of Noir Alley.  Tonight's Eddie Muller selection is Stranger on the Third Floor (1940).  It's great that if you miss it you can also see it at the usual time Sunday morning at 10 am ET. (Also keep in mind that Daylight Savings time starts tomorrow.)

What I'm not sure of is who will do the introductions for the other Noir films Saturday night.  We may be fortunate enough to get an extra helping of Eddie.  The scheduled films are (ET):

8 pm - Kansas City Confidential (1952)

10 pm - The Crooked Way (1949)

These films have not been previously shown on Noir Alley, so if Eddie does the intros it would be a first of sorts.

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1 hour ago, cmovieviewer said:

What I'm not sure of is who will do the introductions for the other Noir films Saturday night.  We may be fortunate enough to get an extra helping of Eddie.  The scheduled films are (ET):

8 pm - Kansas City Confidential (1952)

10 pm - The Crooked Way (1949)

These films have not been previously shown on Noir Alley, so if Eddie does the intros it would be a first of sorts.

The're both great, and The Crooked Way has an L.A. Western Swing Bar in one of the shots.

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Kansas City Confidential is a great movie.  The cast and director did an excellent job.  I have the DVD and frequently watch it.

The roles of Nevile Brand, Lee Van Cleef, Jack Elam and Coleen Gray particularly impressed me.

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stranger.jpg

funny, we were talking about STRANGER ON THE THIRD FLOOR a  few days book and it was the FILTH D'JOUR on today's NOIR ALLEY.

I ALWAYS enjoy the dream sequence and Peter Lorre ("I'd like two hamburgers, and I'd like them raw,") and the guy who played the defense attorney who I thought was DONALD MEEK, but I looked it up and it wasn't DONALD MEEK- really stood out to me this time.

the visuals of the film impress me every time i see it, I just wish the leads had been stronger.

i'm curious about what else director BORIS INGSTER's ouevre has to offer.**

 

** ETA, just got back from imdb and STRANGER ON THE THIRD FLOOR was Ingster's sole directorial effort. damn shame, the man knew what to do with a camera.

 

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Most sadly, Eddie did not intro last night. 

I lost interest and went to bed. 

(It makes a difference)

I'm glad Noir Alley is now on Saturday nights. I felt funny sipping a single malt on Sunday at 7 in the morning. I love Ben but Eddie needs to host this. After all he is our Czar of Noir and Saturday late night should be his natural habitat.

btw my first post

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1 hour ago, LilyoftheValley said:

I'm glad Noir Alley is now on Saturday nights. I felt funny sipping a single malt on Sunday at 7 in the morning. I love Ben but Eddie needs to host this. After all he is our Czar of Noir and Saturday late night should be his natural habitat.

btw my first post

Welcome Lily!

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On 3/11/2018 at 12:32 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

stranger.jpg

funny, we were talking about STRANGER ON THE THIRD FLOOR a  few days book and it was the FILTH D'JOUR on today's NOIR ALLEY.

I ALWAYS enjoy the dream sequence and Peter Lorre ("I'd like two hamburgers, and I'd like them raw,") and the guy who played the defense attorney who I thought was DONALD MEEK, but I looked it up and it wasn't DONALD MEEK- really stood out to me this time.

the visuals of the film impress me every time i see it, I just wish the leads had been stronger.

i'm curious about what else director BORIS INGSTER's ouevre has to offer.**

 

** ETA, just got back from imdb and STRANGER ON THE THIRD FLOOR was Ingster's sole directorial effort. damn shame, the man knew what to do with a camera.

 

I think this was my third time around viewing "Stranger on the Third Floor". I agree with everything Lorna said about it, except his dislike of the actors (excepting the great Peter Lorre, of course - who wouldn't like him?)

I actually really enjoyed Margaret Tallichet's performance as sweet Jane, the compassionate, likable fiance of Mike Ward, the ostensible hero of the film. But really it's Jane's devotion and dedicated detective work (imagine wandering all over some scuzzy New York borough's streets, asking pretty much everyone if they'd seen a creepy guy with a white scarf) that saves the day ( as well as Elisha Wood and the aforesaid "hero".) I found Tallichet's presence, as stated above, to be extremely likable. I wish this lady had appeared in more movies, but according to Eddie, she was too busy being Mrs. William Wyler to work in many more movies after "Stranger". Oh well, sounds like she had a nice marriage and a nice life, good for her.

Moving on...I love, love all that German Expressionism - the beautifully filmed studio sets, all that black and white, the shadows, and especially that crazy dream sequence !  I'm a big fan of all those lurid dream sequences movie-makers were so fond of back then, and the guilt-ridden Mike Ward's nightmare is a great example of those bizarre cinematic nightmares.  I think they're fun, I'm perfectly happy to go on those oneiric * journeys into the disturbed minds of these noir characters.

* New word I learned today ! While reading about "Stranger on the Third Floor" I came across this word, which I found out means "relating to dreams".

Peter Lorre is such a stand-out, such a talented yet sadly under-appreciated actor; I feel he never really got his due. You can't help but think of his performance in "M", from almost ten years earlier, when you watch him lurking about in "Stranger". What is it about this unusual actor that can make you feel compassion for a character who feels compelled to kill? I'll never forget the anguished speech he gives in "M", and while there's no such similar speech in "Stranger", he still makes you feel for him - he looks more sad than evil; plus, he's kind to dogs ! I  think it's something to do with his eyes. I always feel compassion for Lorre's characters, I even root for Ugarte, the sleazy cheap thief in "Casablanca".

Anyway, I think "Stranger on the Third Floor" is great fun, and I'm happy Eddie chose to include it in Noir Ally.

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I didn't listen to Eddie Muller's intro, but I assume he must have made mention of all these German expressionist influences. Hollywood seemed to have a short-lived obsession with expressionism, which was more prevalent some years earlier, but this film reeeally indulged itself, not excepting the intense visual acting that all but died with silent movies. Peter Lorre was an incredible actor, but it is his unique look that is being exploited in this film to project menace. The way his hand creeps around doorways, preceding his panicked face; and the long-held poses and expressions of the lead. I find it unfortunate that this energetic and flamboyant acting style has largely vanished in favor of naturalistic acting. Along with all the nice surreal imagery it made it seem like it was just as much the last expressionist film as it was the first noir. Maybe I don't know where one ends and the other begins. That's what I get for not listening to the intro, (so I don't like to analyze a film before I've seen it. Indigestion before dinner, y'know.)

I love these poses. Acting set against the tune of his reeling, paranoid mind. Just as effective as music. Nice idea.

image.png.07d7d96445524ad9574829d8f895fad6.png

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3 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

( as well as Elisha Wood and the aforesaid "hero".)

Nitpick: I think you mean Elisha Cook, Jr.  Elijah Wood was probably a bit too young to be in Stranger on the Third Floor.

And I've always enjoyed Elisha Cook whenever I see him in a movie.  Even in Blacula.

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Speaking of unique looks being exploited to project menace, I also watched Kansas City Confidential last night. I was impressed at what a really excellent film this was, but I want to mention the beautiful trio of baddies, Lee Van Cleef, Jack Elam and Neville Brand. Talk about getting by on your looks. Not that I don't like all of them as actors, but who can honestly claim that it was really their acting that made them so effective in roles such as these. There are plenty of amazing actors who can play a villain well, but the advantage of looking the part can be more viscerally effective than a merely great actor hope to compete with. A combination of the two is a veritable juggernaut. This aesthetic casting one beloved thing I regard as being leftover from the silent era, even if body-acting a largely lost art. Visual acting, exploiting one's looks to project a feeling. I'll start a thread about it eventually.

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2 hours ago, Fedya said:

Nitpick: I think you mean Elisha Cook, Jr.  Elijah Wood was probably a bit too young to be in Stranger on the Third Floor.

And I've always enjoyed Elisha Cook whenever I see him in a movie.  Even in Blacula.

I love Elisha Cook, Jr.. I don't know that there's anyone who ever shared his specialty before or since, (though I see some parallels between him and Dwight Frye and somewhat Steve Buscemi more recently, don't you?) That is, being the fall guy, or culprit, or victim, or some manner of hysterical, disposable character in just about every film he played in. Yeah, he isn't properly celebrated, but I think he had a great career. How was he not murdered by an enthusiastic fan? I'm not sure I'd be able to resist. Just to see the look on his face.

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Hadnt seen this film before and am loving the Noir Alley new time slot! (Where it should have been from the START!) I no longer have to record it on Sun. morning! The film was a nice little B movie noir. The nightmare sequence really made it stand out. Never heard of McGuire. Did he go anywhere? I'd heard of Tallichet, of course, but dont think I'd seen her in anything until now.

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to clarify: I don't think the leads in STRANGER ON THE THIRD FLOOR were bad by any means, and maybe I was being unfair to the female lead, who has a demanding part- but I got a little too much mugging from the male lead, maybe a touch of Drama School.**

Of course, neither is helped that they are cast opposite some flamboyant character actors really doing it all the Hell up...

I really highly recommend pairing this movie with the following year's I WAKE UP SCREAMING (1941)- which may be available online right now- they both have major roles for ELISHA COOK JR. with EERIE SIMILARITIES! The films have a lot in common, and I think it's safe to say STRANGER was a definite influence on SCREAMING.

 

**in news that will surprise exactly NONE of you, I am hard to please.

 

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22 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

I think this was my third time around viewing "Stranger on the Third Floor".

Peter Lorre is such a stand-out, such a talented yet sadly under-appreciated actor; I feel he never really got his due. You can't help but think of his performance in "M", from almost ten years earlier, when you watch him lurking about in "Stranger". What is it about this unusual actor that can make you feel compassion for a character who feels compelled to kill? I'll never forget the anguished speech he gives in "M", and while there's no such similar speech in "Stranger", he still makes you feel for him - he looks more sad than evil; plus, he's kind to dogs ! I  think it's something to do with his eyes. I always feel compassion for Lorre's characters, I even root for Ugarte, the sleazy cheap thief in "Casablanca".

this comment (AND WORD CHOICE) reminded me of this bit of trivia in re LORRE:

(from imdb)

About 1977, his daughter Catharine Lorre was almost abducted in Los Angeles by the serial killers known as the Hillside Stranglers. She was stopped by Kenneth Bianchi and Angelo Buono, who were impersonating policemen. When they realized she was Lorre's daughter, they let her go because the actor was famous for playing a serial killer in Fritz Lang's M (1931). Catharine Lorre did not realize that they were killers until after they were arrested.

 

I seem to recall reading that the killers gave an interview where they professed to be fans of Lorre's, and thus let his daughter go because they admired his work. so take this nug of trivia for  what it's worth in re: the subject of Lorre's appreciation.

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really tho, Peter Lorre is one of my ten favorite (male) actors of the period, he is so refreshingly weird in an otherwise straightlaced time period, and as Eddie pointed out in his intro to STRANGER ON THE THIRD FLOOR, Lorre had come to represent "the perverse ruin of a fallen Europe, creeping into American cinema" (NOT an EXACT QUOTE, BTW)

as an actor, he is always giving 110%, nowhere moreso than on radio, where he gave- perhaps- the finest performance ever given on the medium:

 

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Peter Lorre is always fun to watch. I can't think of one film he was in that I couldn't take my eyes off of him.

I am glad that Lorre's daughter was spared because of the killer's admiration for her father, but the scary truth is if her father had been Peter Smith, she'd probably have been a goner. Scary world we live in.

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41 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

this comment (AND WORD CHOICE) reminded me of this bit of trivia in re LORRE:

(from imdb)

About 1977, his daughter Catharine Lorre was almost abducted in Los Angeles by the serial killers known as the Hillside Stranglers. She was stopped by Kenneth Bianchi and Angelo Buono, who were impersonating policemen. When they realized she was Lorre's daughter, they let her go because the actor was famous for playing a serial killer in Fritz Lang's M (1931). Catharine Lorre did not realize that they were killers until after they were arrested.

 

I seem to recall reading that the killers gave an interview where they professed to be fans of Lorre's, and thus let his daughter go because they admired his work. so take this nug of trivia for  what it's worth in re: the subject of Lorre's appreciation.

Interesting. I hadnt known this! Lucky for her!

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