Barton_Keyes

Noir Alley

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(...and why fall guys like MacMurray in DOUBLE INDEMNITY and Garfield in THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE did what they did, right?!)

 

Well, I think, too, that Walter Neff and Frank Chambers were simply suckers for a naked ankle (or in the case of Walter, a scantily clad ankle).

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I love The Maltese Falcon too.  I never tire of it.  There's always something new to discover about it or new angles to consider.  Brigid O'Shaughnessy/Miss Wonderly, what is her deal anyway? Lol. I think that what makes it such a great film is it's complexity.  Even though you know what is going to happen when they finally get the Maltese Falcon, the journey getting there is always entertaining. 

 

Right.  And all the characters are so memorable and quirky. Look at Sydney Greenstreet and Peter Lorre, for instance.

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Well, I think, too, that Walter Neff and Frank Chambers were simply suckers for a naked ankle (or in the case of Walter, a scantily clad ankle).

 

Yep...and for that bleached blonde look, too.

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Yep...and for that bleached blonde look, too.

If Ava Gardner had appeared nude and suggested mass murder, Neff would have achieved this objective.

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Yep...and for that bleached blonde look, too.

 

Except that in the case of Phyllis, we're talking a wig that most drag queens wouldn't be caught dead in.

:o

 

I have no idea how she was so successful seducing men. But then, I guess we don't make it all that hard, do we...?

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Except that in the case of Phyllis, we're talking a wig that most drag queens wouldn't be caught dead in.

:o

 

I have no idea how she was so successful seducing men. But then, I guess we don't make it all that hard, do we...?

Seducing "men"? No, seducing "man". Her track record is unknown, unless you count the Byron Barr character..

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Seducing "men"? No, seducing "man". Her track record is unknown, unless you count the Byron Barr character..

 

Seducing men. Yes.

 

1. Why wouldn't we count Nino?

2. Aren't you forgetting MISTER Dietrichson?

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TCM this morning launched noiralley.tcm.com, dedicated to their upcoming Sunday morning noir spotlight hosted by Eddie Muller.

 

In addition to the titles already available on the current online schedule, subsequent titles in this series will include:

 

OUT OF THE PAST (June 7);

PHANTOM LADY (June 14);

HE RAN ALL THE WAY (June 21);

HIGH WALL (June 28);

THEY LIVE BY NIGHT (July 2);

T-MEN (July 9);

GUN CRAZY (July 16);

DEADLINE AT DAWN (July 23);

BORN TO KILL (July 30);

FRAMED (September 3);

711 OCEAN DRIVE (September 10);

IN A LONELY PLACE (September 17);

SCANDAL SHEET (September 24);

POSSESSED (October 1);

THEY WON'T BELIEVE ME (October 8);

SIDE STREET (October 15);

RAW DEAL (October 22);

NO QUESTIONS ASKED (October 29);

SPLIT SECOND (November 5);

NIGHT AND THE CITY (November 12);

THE WINDOW (November 19);

STRANGERS ON A TRAIN (November 26);

PUSHOVER (December 3);

THE BREAKING POINT (December 10);

THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE (December 17);

RED LIGHT (January 7, 2018);

WHERE DANGER LIVES (January 14, 2018);

THE THREAT (January 21, 2018);

TOMORROW IS ANOTHER DAY (January 28, 2018).

 

Set your DVRs accordingly, and happy viewing.

 

Osborne+and+Muller.jpg​TCM's Robert Osborne with Eddie Muller in January 2013.

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Thanks for the list. There are a few titles I havent seen. 2 BIG THUMBS down, though, to TCM for scheduling this series on Sunday mornings. :( Whatever I want to see I'll have to record. :(

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TCM this morning launched noiralley.tcm.com, dedicated to their upcoming Sunday morning noir spotlight hosted by Eddie Muller.

 

In addition to the titles already available on the current online schedule, subsequent titles in this series will include:

 

OUT OF THE PAST (June 7);

PHANTOM LADY (June 14);

HE RAN ALL THE WAY (June 21);

HIGH WALL (June 28);

THEY LIVE BY NIGHT (July 2);

T-MEN (July 9);

GUN CRAZY (July 16);

DEADLINE AT DAWN (July 23);

BORN TO KILL (July 30);

FRAMED (September 3);

711 OCEAN DRIVE (September 10);

IN A LONELY PLACE (September 17);

SCANDAL SHEET (September 24);

POSSESSED (October 1);

THEY WON'T BELIEVE ME (October 8);

SIDE STREET (October 15);

RAW DEAL (October 22);

NO QUESTIONS ASKED (October 29);

SPLIT SECOND (November 5);

NIGHT AND THE CITY (November 12);

THE WINDOW (November 19);

STRANGERS ON A TRAIN (November 26);

PUSHOVER (December 3);

THE BREAKING POINT (December 10);

THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE (December 17);

RED LIGHT (January 7, 2018);

WHERE DANGER LIVES (January 14, 2018);

THE THREAT (January 21, 2018);

TOMORROW IS ANOTHER DAY (January 28, 2018).

 

Set your DVRs accordingly, and happy viewing.

 

Osborne+and+Muller.jpg​TCM's Robert Osborne with Eddie Muller in January 2013.

Look out for NO QUESTIONS ASKED. Very good obscure noir.

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I'm going to try and post a little write-up of each film shown in this series, hopefully shortly after it's aired (Sunday mornings at 10, not the most noirish day or time, but that's when they're doing it. Of course, people can always record and watch later.)

 

The series kicked off with what many - and certainly host Eddie Muller - believe to be the first true noir, the 1941 version of The Maltese Falcon. 

 

This is one of those movies that is so famous and so familiar to so many (even non-classic movie fans), that at first it feels like there can't be much more to say about it, it's been discussed and analysed so often. But in fact, like all great films, you just notice and enjoy more and more things about it with every subsequent viewing.

 

So, I'm not going to talk about the plot. As far as I'm concerned, the plot is the least important feature of film noirs. They're almost always very complicated, often verging on incomprehensible. Doesn't matter, because film noir is all about character, mood, and style. And John Huston's The Maltese Falcon has all three of the above in spades.  ( couldn't resist.)

 

Why is this film so much fun?  (Well, my idea of fun...)  Because it's full of clever quotable dialogue, larger-than-life characters ( and not just Gutman, large as he is), and wonderfully atmospheric sets ( don't know how much if any was actually shot on location in San Francisco, but regardless, the film looks great.)

 

It took this viewing, which must be at least my 10th, to realize that Sydney Greenstreet actually has only three scenes. But they're such scenes !  I always thought he was in it throughout the film, but in fact we don't even see him until about 50 minutes in.  But he dominates the scenes he's in - quite a feat, when you're in the same room with Humphrey Bogart and Peter Lorre. He's so transparently full of ****, you've got to admire the way he talks and reacts to Bogart.  He unblinkingly claims he loves a man who talks a lot, a man who drinks a lot, and a man who says exactly what he means. He's just reacting to whatever Bogart says, every step of the way. There's something so skillful and funny about it, you have to laugh. 

 

Then there's Peter Lorre. I love the way Huston and Bogart - as well of course as Lorre himself - get across the fact that Cairo is gay, without overtly referring to it. Back in 1941 they couldn't do this, and anyway, it's more fun to see how they convey the character's sexual orientation without  openly alluding to it. Yes, by today's standards it's a stereotypical and somewhat negative portrayal of a gay character, but it was also 1941. And hey, we root for Cairo, don't we? At least I do. Like Sam Spade, you gotta respect a guy who's just been roughed up and had his gun taken from him, only to do it all over again ( pull a gun on Spade and insist on searching his room) when he gets the gun back.

 

Then there's the gunsel - oh, Elisha Cook Jr., I love you.  Cook was actually around in minor Hollywood films a while ( 10 years or so?) before getting the role of Wilmer in T.M.F.  I love the way he glares at Sam Spade, hating how he humiliates him but knowing there's nothing he can do about it.  Poor old Wilmer. He's "just like a son" to Gutman  ( yeah, right), but he's going to be the fall guy anyway.

 

As for Mary Astor, she's a wonderful femme fatale from start to finish. Yeah, I get a kick out of her prissy Miss Wonderly act in her first scene, but she's perfect all the way through, right to that despairing blank look on her face as the elevator doors ( yup, looking just like prison) close on her. 

 

I've left a lot out, but I don't want to go on too long  (although Gutman would probably approve, since he's a man who likes to talk) but there's one last aspect of The Maltese Falcon that I wanted to mention:  This movie is really funny ! Maybe you have to have seen it a few times to pick up on that. Or maybe it's just that I know it and love it so well, it makes me smile. But so much of the dialogue is funny  ( how about when Spade asks O'Shaughnessy if she's going to wander all around her apartment touching things again? Maybe it's the way Bogart says it...), and so much of the characterizations of these people is amusing, it's now a noir that makes me laugh - not that I don't take it seriously as a great early noir.

 

Anyway, this deservedly classic noir kicked the Noir Alley series off with a bang, Shirley everyone who's ever seen it loves it too.  (yes?)

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I'm going to try and post a little write-up of each film shown in this series, hopefully shortly after it's aired (Sunday mornings at 10, not the most noirish day or time, but that's when they're doing it. Of course, people can always record and watch later.)

 

The series kicked off with what many - and certainly host Eddie Muller - believe to be the first true noir, the 1941 version of The Maltese Falcon. 

 

This is one of those movies that is so famous and so familiar to so many (even non-classic movie fans), that at first it feels like there can't be much more to say about it, it's been discussed and analysed so often. But in fact, like all great films, you just notice and enjoy more and more things about it with every subsequent viewing.

 

So, I'm not going to talk about the plot. As far as I'm concerned, the plot is the least important feature of film noirs. They're almost always very complicated, often verging on incomprehensible. Doesn't matter, because film noir is all about character, mood, and style. And John Huston's The Maltese Falcon has all three of the above in spades.  ( couldn't resist.)

 

Why is this film so much fun?  (Well, my idea of fun...)  Because it's full of clever quotable dialogue, larger-than-life characters ( and not just Gutman, large as he is), and wonderfully atmospheric sets ( don't know how much if any was actually shot on location in San Francisco, but regardless, the film looks great.)

 

It took this viewing, which must be at least my 10th, to realize that Sydney Greenstreet actually has only three scenes. But they're such scenes !  I always thought he was in it throughout the film, but in fact we don't even see him until about 50 minutes in.  But he dominates the scenes he's in - quite a feat, when you're in the same room with Humphrey Bogart and Peter Lorre. He's so transparently full of ****, you've got to admire the way he talks and reacts to Bogart.  He unblinkingly claims he loves a man who talks a lot, a man who drinks a lot, and a man who says exactly what he means. He's just reacting to whatever Bogart says, every step of the way. There's something so skillful and funny about it, you have to laugh. 

Then there's Peter Lorre. I love the way Huston and Bogart - as well of course as Lorre himself - get across the fact that Cairo is gay, without overtly referring to it. Back in 1941 they couldn't do this, and anyway, it's more fun to see how they convey the character's sexual orientation without  openly alluding to it. Yes, by today's standards it's stereotypical and somewhat negative portrayal of a gay character, but it was also 1941. And hey, we root for Cairo, don't we? At least I do. Like Sam Spade, you gotta respect a guy who's just been roughed up and had his gun taken from him, only to do it all over again ( pull a gun on Spade and insist on searching his room) when he gets the gun back.

 

Then there's the gunsel - oh, Elisha Cook Jr., I love you.  Cook was actually around in minor Hollywood films a while ( 10 years or so?) before getting the role of Wilmer in T.M.F.  I love the way he glares at Sam Spade, hating how he humiliates him but knowing there's nothing he can do about it.  Poor old Wilmer. He's "just like a son" to Gutman  ( yeah, right), but he's going to be the fall guy anyway.

 

As for Mary Astor, she's a wonderful femme fatale from start to finish. Yeah, I get a kick out her prissy Miss Wonderly act in her first scene, but she's perfect all the way through, right to that despairing blank look on her face as the elevator doors ( yup, looking just like prison) close on her. 

 

I've left a lot out, but I don't want to go on too long  (although Gutman would probably approve, since he's a man who likes to talk) but there's one last aspect of The Maltese Falcon that I wanted to mention:  This movie is really funny ! Maybe you have to have seen it a few times to pick up on that. Or maybe that I just know it and love it so well, it makes me smile. But so much of the dialogue is funny  ( how about when Spade asks O'Shaughnessy if she's going to wander all around her apartment touching things again? Maybe it's the way Boagart says it...), and so much of the characterizations of these people is amusing, it's now a noir that makes me laugh - not that I don't take it seriously as a great early noir.

 

Anyway, this deservedly classic noir kicked the Noir Alley series off with a bang, Shirley everyone who's ever seen it loves it too.  (yes?)

It would be much appreciated if you could do this every week, for those of us who can't see them, such as yours truly.

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i remember some years ago Mr. Muller hosted a double feature on TCM where he played the 1931(?) Ricardo Cortez version before a showing of the 1941 version.

 

The 1931 version is terrible, but seeing it and then the remake really was a FASCINATING master class in master craftsmanship; it's amazing to watch the two back to back.  it really heightened my already high appreciation of the 1941 version.

 

everything they do wrong in the 1931 version they do SO RIGHT in the 1941.

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It would be much appreciated if you could do this every week, for those of us who can't see them, such as yours truly.

 

Gee, D.G.F., I'm genuinely touched. I thought you were going to say something about how loooong my post was, and since you're a man who does not like a man ( or woman) who talks a lot, I was expecting some kind of crack, maybe a request to keep it short if I actually expected anyone to read it.

 

Then again, I know you're a big noir fan, so maybe you decided to make an exception for my loquacious ways with this thread.

 

You know, you could always reschedule your spinning class?  (oh maybe not.)  Could you just jump on an actual bike and go for a good long cycling ride through the streets of San Francisco ( or Philadelphia) after the Sunday morning screenings? 

Or get a DVR. You're a smart guy, I know you could easily figure it out. Think of all the great TCM movies you could view at your own convenience.  (full disclosure: I myself do not have a DVR. But that doesn't mean you couldn't.)

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I'm going to try and post a little write-up of each film shown in this series, hopefully shortly after it's aired (Sunday mornings at 10, not the most noirish day or time, but that's when they're doing it. Of course, people can always record and watch later.)

 

The series kicked off with what many - and certainly host Eddie Muller - believe to be the first true noir, the 1941 version of The Maltese Falcon. 

 

This is one of those movies that is so famous and so familiar to so many (even non-classic movie fans), that at first it feels like there can't be much more to say about it, it's been discussed and analysed so often. But in fact, like all great films, you just notice and enjoy more and more things about it with every subsequent viewing.

 

So, I'm not going to talk about the plot. As far as I'm concerned, the plot is the least important feature of film noirs. They're almost always very complicated, often verging on incomprehensible. Doesn't matter, because film noir is all about character, mood, and style. And John Huston's The Maltese Falcon has all three of the above in spades.  ( couldn't resist.)

 

Why is this film so much fun?  (Well, my idea of fun...)  Because it's full of clever quotable dialogue, larger-than-life characters ( and not just Gutman, large as he is), and wonderfully atmospheric sets ( don't know how much if any was actually shot on location in San Francisco, but regardless, the film looks great.)

 

It took this viewing, which must be at least my 10th, to realize that Sydney Greenstreet actually has only three scenes. But they're such scenes !  I always thought he was in it throughout the film, but in fact we don't even see him until about 50 minutes in.  But he dominates the scenes he's in - quite a feat, when you're in the same room with Humphrey Bogart and Peter Lorre. He's so transparently full of ****, you've got to admire the way he talks and reacts to Bogart.  He unblinkingly claims he loves a man who talks a lot, a man who drinks a lot, and a man who says exactly what he means. He's just reacting to whatever Bogart says, every step of the way. There's something so skillful and funny about it, you have to laugh. 

 

Then there's Peter Lorre. I love the way Huston and Bogart - as well of course as Lorre himself - get across the fact that Cairo is gay, without overtly referring to it. Back in 1941 they couldn't do this, and anyway, it's more fun to see how they convey the character's sexual orientation without  openly alluding to it. Yes, by today's standards it's a stereotypical and somewhat negative portrayal of a gay character, but it was also 1941. And hey, we root for Cairo, don't we? At least I do. Like Sam Spade, you gotta respect a guy who's just been roughed up and had his gun taken from him, only to do it all over again ( pull a gun on Spade and insist on searching his room) when he gets the gun back.

 

Then there's the gunsel - oh, Elisha Cook Jr., I love you.  Cook was actually around in minor Hollywood films a while ( 10 years or so?) before getting the role of Wilmer in T.M.F.  I love the way he glares at Sam Spade, hating how he humiliates him but knowing there's nothing he can do about it.  Poor old Wilmer. He's "just like a son" to Gutman  ( yeah, right), but he's going to be the fall guy anyway.

 

As for Mary Astor, she's a wonderful femme fatale from start to finish. Yeah, I get a kick out her prissy Miss Wonderly act in her first scene, but she's perfect all the way through, right to that despairing blank look on her face as the elevator doors ( yup, looking just like prison) close on her. 

 

I've left a lot out, but I don't want to go on too long  (although Gutman would probably approve, since he's a man who likes to talk) but there's one last aspect of The Maltese Falcon that I wanted to mention:  This movie is really funny ! Maybe you have to have seen it a few times to pick up on that. Or maybe it's just that I know it and love it so well, it makes me smile. But so much of the dialogue is funny  ( how about when Spade asks O'Shaughnessy if she's going to wander all around her apartment touching things again? Maybe it's the way Bogart says it...), and so much of the characterizations of these people is amusing, it's now a noir that makes me laugh - not that I don't take it seriously as a great early noir.

 

Anyway, this deservedly classic noir kicked the Noir Alley series off with a bang, Shirley everyone who's ever seen it loves it too.  (yes?)

 

Thanks for the great write up Miss Wonderly! Here on the West Coast, the series is on at an even more "un-noiry" time--7AM! I will definitely have to record any noir film that sounds interesting to me.  I love The Maltese Falcon.  It is so much fun.  I agree with everything you said.  My husband and I saw it last year in the theater and it was an even more fun experience on the big screen and you notice so much more.

 

I'm so dense, it took me at least three viewings to realize what Huston was trying to convey about the Cairo character.  My husband on the other hand, ever the show off, says after his first viewing, "I like how they implied that Cairo was gay without explicitly saying it."  I say, "huh?" and then he goes on to explain to me all the clues.  ::Sigh:: I guess he's a better noir watcher than I. Now I "get" it. 

 

One of my favorite parts of the movie is the scene between Bogart and Greenstreet in the hotel.  That scene is so much fun to watch--both guys thinking they have a one-up on each other.  I also love the ending scene with Bogart sending Astor up the river.  I love that Huston didn't go for a contrived "happy" ending by having Astor get away with "it." Huston gave Astor everything she deserved. 

 

I'm looking forward to Detour, I missed it the last time it was on. 

 

I wish they would have done this series Sunday nights instead.  Sunday at 7am makes it difficult to watch.  Lol.  I think I'll record and watch it at night instead. 

 

I look forward to your next entry, Miss Wonderly! 

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Thanks for the great write up Miss Wonderly! Here on the West Coast, the series is on at an even more "un-noiry" time--7AM! I will definitely have to record any noir film that sounds interesting to me.  I love The Maltese Falcon.  It is so much fun.  I agree with everything you said.  My husband and I saw it last year in the theater and it was an even more fun experience on the big screen and you notice so much more.....

 

 

....One of my favorite parts of the movie is the scene between Bogart and Greenstreet in the hotel.  That scene is so much fun to watch--both guys thinking they have a one-up on each other.  ....

 

 

 

speedy, your entire post was worth quoting, but I just selected parts of it because I wanted to say one more thing about how funny the film is, which you mention in the parts of your comment I quoted above.

 

There's a scene in Spade's apartment that's an example of how funny the film is. He's got Cairo and Brigid there, he's trying to get to the truth of things (good luck, Sam baby), when the cops call on him ( at 1 in the morning, yet.)

While he's talking to them at the door, there's the sound of a scuffle, a scream, a call for help  ( not from the lady, from the gentleman !)

When the cops and Spade rush in to the apartment, they're treated to a scene of Cairo and O'Shaughnessy calling each other liars and other names. What I find hilarious is the bit where Brigid gets so irritated with Cairo, she kicks him ! They're like a couple of kids, brother and sister fighting while the parents try to calm them down. I have to laugh out loud when the furious Brigid boots Cairo, hard, with her pointy high heeled shoe !

 

Thanks for your post ( and not just the part I quoted).  It's so nice that you and  your husband got to see this wonderful movie up on the big screen.

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Why am I not surprised that LHF doesn't like the 1931 version of The Maltese Falcon?

 

And before the Humphrey Bogart version (which I tend to think of more as a straight mystery than noir) there was Stranger on the Third Floor and even before that the French Le jour se lève (aka Daybreak and remade in Hollywood as The Long Night).

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Why am I not surprised that LHF doesn't like the 1931 version of The Maltese Falcon?

 

And before the Humphrey Bogart version (which I tend to think of more as a straight mystery than noir) there was Stranger on the Third Floor and even before that the French Le jour se lève (aka Daybreak and remade in Hollywood as The Long Night).

 

Ok, but none of that takes away from how well-done and enjoyable ( and noirish) Huston's Maltese Falcon is.

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Ok, but none of that takes away from how well-done and enjoyable ( and noirish) Huston's Maltese Falcon is.

Actually I wake Up Screaming released just a few weeks later was far and away more Noir-ish visually than The Maltese Falcon.

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Why am I not surprised that LHF doesn't like the 1931 version of The Maltese Falcon?

 

 

i dunno, why aren't you?

it's a film i have a hard time imagining anyone really liking, but one i recommend to all as a curiosity and a lesson in acting and direction.

 

take, for example the following scene between Spade and Wonderly which appears word for word in both versions:

 

Brigid O'Shaughnessy:

Help me.

 

Sam Spade:

You won't need much of anybody's help. You're good. Chiefly your eyes, I think, and that throb you get in your voice when you say things like 'Be generous, Mr. Spade.'

 

Brigid O'Shaughnessy:

I deserve that. But the lie was in the way I said it, not at all in what I said. It's my own fault if you can't believe me now.

 

Sam Spade:

Ah, now you are dangerous.

 

As delivered by Ricardo Cortez, it's smug and insufferable- he comes off as a real jackass just taunting the woman because he's a dope with some leverage. He thinks he's being "cute."

 

Bogart takes the same line and layers it with multiple meanings using way subtler technique  and voice inflections, and in the process the character of Spade becomes more interesting and compelling- nuanced as neither entirely good or entirely bad- the line is fully appreciated, and his costar's performance is complimented as well.  .

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While I like BOTH versions, I still like Bogey's more.  He pulls his Spade off in a way it doesn't seem like he's acting (if ya know what I mean).

 

 

Sepiatone

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While I like BOTH versions, I still like Bogey's more.  He pulls his Spade off in a way it doesn't seem like he's acting (if ya know what I mean).

 

 

Sepiatone

 

1941 was an incredible year for actors in a leading role, a lot of performances that would've won outright in other years. But Bogart's work in THE MALTESE FALCON is the best of them all.

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Actually I wake Up Screaming released just a few weeks later was far and away more Noir-ish visually than The Maltese Falcon.

 

cigarjoe, my friend: I know how much you like film noir, and how much you know about this kind of film. A lot. I respect that.

But I've discovered in the many years I've been a noir fan ( not saying you haven't been a fan probably for an equal number of years) that a lot of noir aficionados get all wrought up about the definition of "noir", which movies on a list of classic noirs don't really belong there, some movies labelled as noir aren't really, etc. etc.

 

And I get that - I can be like that myself, and have often rolled my eyes at some of the movies some over-eager newbie noir fans want to classify as "noir". 

So maybe in reaction to that overly facile kind of noir labelling, you ( and as I said, me too) get annoyed or at the very least, particular about what some people are quick to call a "noir" film.

 

All this is by way of saying, baby I don't care if I Wake Up Screaming  is more legitimately "noir" in terms of its visuals than The Maltese Falcon. You are right, I've seen I.W.U.S. several times, and it's a beautifully noirish movie, definitely belongs on a list of classic noirs, and yes, the visuals beat out Falcon for shadows, rainy streets, camera angles, and many of the other features of noir cinematography.

It's a good movie, I really like it. Who knew Betty Grable had such acting chops? Or Victor Mature? I love Laird Cregar as the sinister morally ambiguous detective , and hey, our friend Elisha Cook Jr. 's in this one, too. (Mr. Cook was actually in a lot of film noirs, as I'm sure you know. He deserves more attention than he gets...)

 

But sometimes I get kind of weary of us hard-core noir fans splitting hairs over which films deserve the title "noir", and which ones have more "noir" features than others, etc. etc. 

 

They're both good movies, and I'd say, they're both film noirs. I have a bit of a preference for the John Huston film, but that doesn't mean I don't appreciate I Wake Up Screaming.

 

I just don't think we need to quibble over every shadow, drop of rain, tilted camera angle, or late night diner that is or is not present in a movie classified as a film noir.

 

I say this with respect, I really appreciate your knowledge and your contributions to these forums.

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Actually I wake Up Screaming released just a few weeks later was far and away more Noir-ish visually than The Maltese Falcon.

THE LETTER was released a year earlier than  THE MALTESE FALCON, and though not usually considered a true noir, it was also more noirish.

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Something just popped into my head; maybe I've thought this before but just never typed out a comment . . .

 

     Are there any color films that are considered 'film noir'?  I can't think of any, but I'm not a 'noir' expert of any sort. 

 

     ♣SHAMELESS PLUG♣:  The black-and-white 1999 movie "THE WOMAN CHASER" starring Patrick Warburton and directed by Robinson Devor.  It's set in early '60s Los Angeles with Warburton as a used car dealer who aspires to be a filmmaker.  Apparently there was a version of this movie released on cable in color, but I've only seen the VHS release which is in the proper B&W.  The movie has that 'look' that can be considered 'noirish'.  I've seen it thrice via the tape.  Perhaps some of y'all on here might like it as well.  I've gotta admit to having read the Leonard Maltin review of this movie in his guide and that's what motivated me to try and find it.  I'd never heard of "The Woman Chaser" until I was rifling through my Maltin guide one day over a decade ago and ran across the review.  He gave it  **½ out of ****.  It runs 90 minutes.      

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