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Charade; The Pink Panther (both 1963)

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Tonight I watched two old favorites of mine. I've seen both of them multiple times:

 

Charade (1963)

 

The Pink Panther (1963)

 

Both films have great storylines, lovely music (thank you, Mr. Mancini), terrific cinematography, and I'm always impressed by the clothing/hairdos. Everyone in both films is perfectly cast. Each film is well paced. Usually I'll watch these films back-to-back.

 

Highly recommended.

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I wanted to add a few comments here about Charade...MAJOR SPOILERS AHEAD...

 

spoilers....

 

1. How on earth could Cary Grant's character NOT have thought that the stamps would be worth a lot of money? Considering the kind of job he did, it should have obvious to him.

 

2. Why on earth did Reggie's husband decide to "hide" the money by buying stamps? Didn't he think that the letter could get lost in the mail, or that Reggie would just toss out the envelope without bothering to take out the stamps?

 

3. No way could Tex (the final victim) have written "DYLE" on the floor before he died. He was completely bound. I think the real Carson Dyle must have done it, in order to implicate the man calling himself Dyle. Serious mistake on his part, because the man calling himself Dyle would have clued in that the real Carson Dyle must still be alive. That's probably why he said "that man is Carson Dyle" when Reggie went to meet the man she thought she could trust.

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Tonight I watched two old favorites of mine. I've seen both of them multiple times:

 

Charade (1963)

 

The Pink Panther (1963)

 

Both films have great storylines, lovely music (thank you, Mr. Mancini), terrific cinematography, and I'm always impressed by the clothing/hairdos. Everyone in both films is perfectly cast. Each film is well paced. Usually I'll watch these films back-to-back.

 

Highly recommended.

I don't like CHARADE, at all; but, I love THE PINK PANTHER.

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I don't like CHARADE, at all; but, I love THE PINK PANTHER.

 

Hmm...interesting!

 

In the past, I've heard mixed feelings from others about The Pink Panther, but all those folks seemed to think that Charade was excellent. Some of these folks seem to think that The Pink Panther has a weak storyline, that it's too slow, etc.

 

Now I come across someone who doesn't like Charade, but loves The Pink Panther. I admit that this is the first time I've bumped into anyone on any forum with these opinions of both films.

 

Just out of curiosity, what don't you like about Charade

 

(Personally, I adore both movies!)

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Hmm...interesting!

 

In the past, I've heard mixed feelings from others about The Pink Panther, but all those folks seemed to think that Charade was excellent. Some of these folks seem to think that The Pink Panther has a weak storyline, that it's too slow, etc.

 

Now I come across someone who doesn't like Charade, but loves The Pink Panther. I admit that this is the first time I've bumped into anyone on any forum with these opinions of both films.

 

Just out of curiosity, what don't you like about Charade

 

(Personally, I adore both movies!)

To me, everything about CHARADE is forced.  It tries too hard to be Hitchcock, but without his flair for composition. The comedic bits aren't really funny, the May/December "romance" is a bit creepy; and, the endless twists don't make up for a lack of well-scripted plot.  There's nothing about THE PINK PANTHER, I don't like.   It's sophistication is off the charts, and real.  Whereas, with CHARADE, everything is so artificial.  TPP is filled with witty moments, and, while I find none of it laugh-out-loud funny, I watch the entire thing with a smile on my face, no matter how many times I've seen it.  It's my middle son's favorite film, so I've seen it, a lot!   After two times (once when it was in theaters, and once, again, about 10 years ago), I have no interest in seeing CHARADE, ever again.

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I don't like CHARADE, at all; but, I love THE PINK PANTHER.

 

Since I never saw the film Charade, I cannot compare it to The Pink Panther, which I saw back in 1963, when it first came out, and thought it was a lot of fun.

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To me, everything about CHARADE is forced.  It tries too hard to be Hitchcock, but without his flair for composition. The comedic bits aren't really funny, the May/December "romance" is a bit creepy; and, the endless twists don't make up for a lack of well-scripted plot.  There's nothing about THE PINK PANTHER, I don't like.   It's sophistication is off the charts, and real.  Whereas, with CHARADE, everything is so artificial.  TPP is filled with witty moments, and, while I find none of it laugh-out-loud funny, I watch the entire thing with a smile on my face, no matter how many times I've seen it.  It's my middle son's favorite film, so I've seen it, a lot!   After two times (once when it was in theaters, and once, again, about 10 years ago), I have no interest in seeing CHARADE, ever again.

 

I agree with you about Charade.   I really wanted to love this film (Grant \ Hepburn,,,,  what could go wrong),  but I find the film to be only so-so.     To protect the parties involved I always said the reason was that Grant was too old for the role,  but what you list here are much closer to the truth.

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To me, everything about CHARADE is forced.  It tries too hard to be Hitchcock, but without his flair for composition. The comedic bits aren't really funny, the May/December "romance" is a bit creepy; and, the endless twists don't make up for a lack of well-scripted plot.  There's nothing about THE PINK PANTHER, I don't like.   It's sophistication is off the charts, and real.  Whereas, with CHARADE, everything is so artificial.  TPP is filled with witty moments, and, while I find none of it laugh-out-loud funny, I watch the entire thing with a smile on my face, no matter how many times I've seen it.  It's my middle son's favorite film, so I've seen it, a lot!   After two times (once when it was in theaters, and once, again, about 10 years ago), I have no interest in seeing CHARADE, ever again.

 

The Pink Panther is an extremely charming film. I, too, watch it with a smile on my face.  :)

 

As for Charade, I heard that even Cary Grant didn't want the romance to be included because he thought that there was too much of an age gap between him and Audrey. The romance was a tad unnecessary, I admit. Still, I love the twists, the music, the clothes, the scenery, etc.

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Since I never saw the film Charade, I cannot compare it to The Pink Panther, which I saw back in 1963, when it first came out, and thought it was a lot of fun.

Well, I don't actually think the film's bear comparison, but they are mentioned here, together, due to their release year and Mancini composing both scores (wonderfully, I might add).

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Well, I don't actually think the film's bear comparison, but they are mentioned here, together, due to their release year and Mancini composing both scores (wonderfully, I might add).

 

Oh, I don't think that the two films HAVE to be compared. I just find myself watching these two one after the other when I watch them. That's why I thought about getting discussion going about both films.

 

But yeah, I can see how some folks won't associate the two movies with each other.

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Well, I don't actually think the film's bear comparison, but they are mentioned here, together, due to their release year and Mancini composing both scores (wonderfully, I might add).

 

Thanks for your input, johnm001.  I liked The Pink Panther, but admittedly had no idea that Mancini composed the musical score.  

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Thanks for your input, johnm001.  I liked The Pink Panther, but admittedly had no idea that Mancini composed the musical score.  

 

Another film with great Mancini music is Bachelor in Paradise (1961). It has a paper-thin plot, but the soundtrack is lovely. Also, it's very much a period piece. When I saw it, I was treated to a good look at early sixties cars, the inside of a grocery store (where one scene is set), an early 60s bowling alley (another brief scene set there), a drive-in restaurant (I've been to one of those a couple of times as a kid in the eighties before they closed), and a glimpse into early sixties decor (Bob Hope's character is shown in detail the house which he would be renting in this community). They even included little details like showing a couple of milkmen and a newspaper delivery boy flinging the newspapers directly out of his car onto the lawns. These details might not seem like much to those old enough to remember the early sixties, but I appreciated these kinds of details. (Great cast, too!)

 

But ultimately, the Mancini score is the highlight of the film. By the way, Mancini competed with himself at the Oscars in 1962 for best original song: Bachelor in Paradise (opening song) versus the theme song to Breakfast at Tiffany's (the winner).

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First, BACHELOR IN PARADISE - something about Bob Hope (who I grew up watching) just thrills me. I know he had a lot of "sexual harassment" issues all his life, etc. But he is just so APPROACHABLE when he gets on screen, so "real." BACHELOR IN PARADISE is particularly fun because it is a "time-capsule" kind of thing with suburbia--weird, yet so familiar. I love all his movies, though, especially the later ones, CANCEL MY RESERVATION being the fave. But Bob is a "star", and can grab your attention no matter what.

 

CHARADE has so many memories for me. (sigh) It makes no sense at all. Maybe the best movies are like this. I remember watching it (back in the day) when James Coburn was becoming big in films, and when he made his entrance, the audience practically swooned.

Every star in this movie just about steals it from every other star, and (except for Cary Grant, who did other great roles), CHARADE has their best of all performances. My current issue with it is Audrey Hepburn. I have read a lot about her, and she was such a vixen and "free" with her favors (married men, other men, she didn't care) that it's hard to adore her in her roles as I once did.

 

It seems that Bob Hope's wild ways make him more adorable, but Audrey's just DON'T.

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First, BACHELOR IN PARADISE - something about Bob Hope (who I grew up watching) just thrills me. I know he had a lot of "sexual harassment" issues all his life, etc. But he is just so APPROACHABLE when he gets on screen, so "real." BACHELOR IN PARADISE is particularly fun because it is a "time-capsule" kind of thing with suburbia--weird, yet so familiar. I love all his movies, though, especially the later ones, CANCEL MY RESERVATION being the fave. But Bob is a "star", and can grab your attention no matter what.

 

CHARADE has so many memories for me. (sigh) It makes no sense at all. Maybe the best movies are like this. I remember watching it (back in the day) when James Coburn was becoming big in films, and when he made his entrance, the audience practically swooned.

Every star in this movie just about steals it from every other star, and (except for Cary Grant, who did other great roles), CHARADE has their best of all performances. My current issue with it is Audrey Hepburn. I have read a lot about her, and she was such a vixen and "free" with her favors (married men, other men, she didn't care) that it's hard to adore her in her roles as I once did.

 

It seems that Bob Hope's wild ways make him more adorable, but Audrey's just DON'T.

 

Do you also have difficulty with actors that were known racist,  like Water Brennan or Eugene Pallette?

 

I don't since an actor's off screen behavior or persona doesn't impact my ability to enjoy said actor's on-screen work.

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First, BACHELOR IN PARADISE - something about Bob Hope (who I grew up watching) just thrills me. I know he had a lot of "sexual harassment" issues all his life, etc. But he is just so APPROACHABLE when he gets on screen, so "real." BACHELOR IN PARADISE is particularly fun because it is a "time-capsule" kind of thing with suburbia--weird, yet so familiar. I love all his movies, though, especially the later ones, CANCEL MY RESERVATION being the fave. But Bob is a "star", and can grab your attention no matter what.

 

CHARADE has so many memories for me. (sigh) It makes no sense at all. Maybe the best movies are like this. I remember watching it (back in the day) when James Coburn was becoming big in films, and when he made his entrance, the audience practically swooned.

Every star in this movie just about steals it from every other star, and (except for Cary Grant, who did other great roles), CHARADE has their best of all performances. My current issue with it is Audrey Hepburn. I have read a lot about her, and she was such a vixen and "free" with her favors (married men, other men, she didn't care) that it's hard to adore her in her roles as I once did.

 

It seems that Bob Hope's wild ways make him more adorable, but Audrey's just DON'T.

 

Excellent way of putting it (about Bachelor in Paradise), that it has that "time capsule" thing going.

 

Regarding Audrey Hepburn: generally I don't follow the personal lives of the actors. In almost all cases, I don't know which of them were homosexual, who was racist, who was Democrat/Republican, etc. It just doesn't matter to me. Besides, a lot of what's said about them could be gossip. Interesting that a lot of these details come out after they've passed on, so they have no way of defending themselves. If they have ever said these things about themselves, that would be different. But if years after their passing suddenly people start saying that so-and-so slept around, well...I'm careful not to believe everything I hear.

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Personal details about STARS:

Sometimes it really bothers me, sometimes it doesn't.

Audrey Hepburn had a miserable life (and was rejected by her father), but it just doesn't excuse bagging every man in her orbit that could help her through a movie (many great stars did this--Grace Kelly, Ingrid Bergman, etc.)

 

Racist stars ditto---in the time they were living, that's just "life."

One of the stars in LIFEBOAT was like this, and it made Canada Lee's time on the set (in the small boat) pretty tense. The other stars in the boat deplored all this, though.

I'm pretty sure the racist was Henry Hull-I certainly hope it wasn't Walter Slezak.

 

Today, with LIVING (and recently dead) stars, though, it's almost impossible to watch them. I just cannot watch WOODY ALLEN, MEL GIBSON, ARNOLD SWARZENEGGAR, or PHILLIP SEYMOUR HOFFMAN any more.

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Personal details about STARS:

Sometimes it really bothers me, sometimes it doesn't.

Audrey Hepburn had a miserable life (and was rejected by her father), but it just doesn't excuse bagging every man in her orbit that could help her through a movie (many great stars did this--Grace Kelly, Ingrid Bergman, etc.)

 

Did Audrey herself admit to sleeping with all these guys, or is that gossip which started after she passed away? (Ditto with Grace Kelly, Ingrid Bergman...)

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Audrey---the vixen!

 

The mistake I made was reading the new Biography of Teresa Wright, one of the nicest of all actresses, in movies and stage.

Audrey Hepburn hijacked Teresa's husband, who was in the Congo writing (and re-writing) the movie A NUN'S STORY with Audrey starring.

(wow!). The Husband wrote a novel about his torrid affair with Audrey in detail and encouraged Teresa to read the book!

Love the actress Audrey, love everything about THE NUN'S STORY, too.

But she is not a person to admire, IMHO. 

Teresa Wright is.

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Personal details about STARS:

Sometimes it really bothers me, sometimes it doesn't.

Audrey Hepburn had a miserable life (and was rejected by her father), but it just doesn't excuse bagging every man in her orbit that could help her through a movie (many great stars did this--Grace Kelly, Ingrid Bergman, etc.)

 

Racist stars ditto---in the time they were living, that's just "life."

One of the stars in LIFEBOAT was like this, and it made Canada Lee's time on the set (in the small boat) pretty tense. The other stars in the boat deplored all this, though.

I'm pretty sure the racist was Henry Hull-I certainly hope it wasn't Walter Slezak.

 

Today, with LIVING (and recently dead) stars, though, it's almost impossible to watch them. I just cannot watch WOODY ALLEN, MEL GIBSON, ARNOLD SWARZENEGGAR, or PHILLIP SEYMOUR HOFFMAN any more.

 

How about watching films where Allen is the director but not an actor?     I ask because is it seeing the actor on film that bothers you or something else?   E.g. some have said they don't wish to spend money on a 'creep' and that is why they won't rent a DVD or attend the theater to see a film directed by or starring said creep.

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Audrey---the vixen!

 

The mistake I made was reading the new Biography of Teresa Wright, one of the nicest of all actresses, in movies and stage.

Audrey Hepburn hijacked Teresa's husband, who was in the Congo writing (and re-writing) the movie A NUN'S STORY with Audrey starring.

(wow!). The Husband wrote a novel about his torrid affair with Audrey in detail and encouraged Teresa to read the book!

Love the actress Audrey, love everything about THE NUN'S STORY, too.

But she is not a person to admire, IMHO. 

Teresa Wright is.

 

I'm not excusing Audrey's behavior, but...did Audrey FORCE Teresa's hubby to have an affair with her, or did he go willingly? It takes two to tango, and this sounds like a perfect example of such a situation. So this hubby wrote a book about all this and he wanted his wife to read this book? Seriously? He doesn't exactly sound like much of a character.

 

By the way, who exactly are you talking about? I looked up Teresa Wright and I see that she divorced in 1952, and remarried in 1959. Are you talking about the guy she had divorced a few years earlier, or about the guy she might not have been married to yet when the movie was being filmed?

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It was Teresa's 2nd husband.

Yes, I guess Teresa should have cut him loose immediately.

But AUDREY was making darned sure that her role in NUN'S STORY was crafted by a writer under her spell.

Audrey was a canny super-star!

 

The biography is : A GIRL'S GOT TO BREATHE-by Donald Spoto, 2016.

Teresa, survivor that she was, overcame some tough times as a child.

Her mother was a drug-addict and prostitute who died early, but Teresa was dearly loved and looked after by her "natural" father and his extended family.

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It was Teresa's 2nd husband.

Yes, I guess Teresa should have cut him loose immediately.

But AUDREY was making darned sure that her role in NUN'S STORY was crafted by a writer under her spell.

Audrey was a canny super-star!

 

The biography is : A GIRL'S GOT TO BREATHE-by Donald Spoto, 2016.

Teresa, survivor that she was, overcame some tough times as a child.

Her mother was a drug-addict and prostitute who died early, but Teresa was dearly loved and looked after by her "natural" father and his extended family.

 

Thanks for the info. I'm still confused, because according to IMDb, that film (Nun's Story) was released before Teresa even married the guy. And she was with the guy nearly 20 years before they divorced. Did he even know Teresa when he had the affair with Audrey?

 

Ah, who knows? This is why I just follow what they do on the big screen, not the "behind the scenes" stuff. There are two sides to every story. I like both actresses.

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THE NUN'S STORY is the film Audrey Hepburn decided to do, over THE TRAPP FAMILY SINGER, which Paramount optioned for her.  Years later, she would be lobbying hard to star in the musical version of THE TRAPP FAMILY SINGERS.  As would Leslie Caron, Doris Day, Shirley Jones, Debbie Reynolds and pretty much every other actress in Hollywood at the time.

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By the way, I watched both of these again a few days ago. I can't go too long without seeing these films.

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