kjrwe

The Woman in the Window: the ending (spoilers!!!)

10 posts in this topic

Obvious spoilers ahead...

 

I'm just wondering what others think of the ending of The Woman in the Window (1944)?

 

SPOILERS....

 

The ending is basically an "it's all a dream" ending. 

 

Generally I'm not a huge fan of this sort of ending, but the storyline was completed before the professor wakes up and I think that he learned a lesson from his dream about answering the "call of adventure" (or however he put it).

 

What are your opinions of the ending?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Obvious spoilers ahead...

 

I'm just wondering what others think of the ending of The Woman in the Window (1944)?

 

SPOILERS....

 

The ending is basically an "it's all a dream" ending. 

 

Generally I'm not a huge fan of this sort of ending, but the storyline was completed before the professor wakes up and I think that he learned a lesson from his dream about answering the "call of adventure" (or however he put it).

 

What are your opinions of the ending?

I liked the film and the ending.  It captured the doldrums of middle-aged men with the caution that adventure can lead to big trouble.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love this movie (one of my all time personal favs) and love the ending. A large portion of the film is dark & gritty; so the twist ending comes as a welcome relief. And the way it's handled is completely believable! 

 

Off topic....I'm always amused at what a fox Joan Bennett still was in her Mid to Late 1940's Film Noir Vixen period. Her beautiful long brunette locks, fashionable clothes, bare midriffs, etc were very becoming. Shocking that only 5 years later (starting with the excellent The Reckless Moment in 1949) she was playing the mothers of young adults in dowdy peter pan collared blouses and that damn Claudette Colbert Poodle Haircut that many an actress fell victim to in the 1950's. *sigh*  :rolleyes:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love this movie (one of my all time personal favs) and love the ending. A large portion of the film is dark & gritty; so the twist ending comes as a welcome relief. And the way it's handled is completely believable! 

 

Off topic....I'm always amused at what a fox Joan Bennett still was in her Mid to Late 1940's Film Noir Vixen period. Her beautiful long brunette locks, fashionable clothes, bare midriffs, etc were very becoming. Shocking that only 5 years later (starting with the excellent The Reckless Moment in 1949) she was playing the mothers of young adults in dowdy peter pan collared blouses and that damn Claudette Colbert Poodle Haircut that many an actress fell victim to in the 1950's. *sigh*  :rolleyes:

 

Yes,  Joan was beautiful and very stylish during the 40s,  but in 1949 she was 39 and that was often the kiss of death for an actress as it relates to being a romantic lead \ love interest of the leading male (who was often in his late 40s or even 50s!).    So I can hear the studio suits saying she should feel lucky that James Mason (who was 40) was sexually interested in her in The Reckless Moment.  I.e. if you don't get these mother roles you get no work at all. 

 

Love that hairdo line.   Yea,  many of those 50s hairstyles made the women look dowdy.   E.g. Jane Wyman.   She was featured yesterday in a film released in 1944 and she was very beautiful (and what legs),  but while she was a big star during the 50s her look was a lot less appealing.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes,  Joan was beautiful and very stylish during the 40s,  but in 1949 she was 39 and that was often the kiss of death for an actress as it relates to being a romantic lead \ love interest of the leading male (who was often in his late 40s or even 50s!).    So I can hear the studio suits saying she should feel lucky that James Mason (who was 40) was sexually interested in her in The Reckless Moment.  I.e. if you don't get these mother roles you get no work at all. 

 

Love that hairdo line.   Yea,  many of those 50s hairstyles made the women look dowdy.   E.g. Jane Wyman.   She was featured yesterday in a film released in 1944 and she was very beautiful (and what legs),  but while she was a big star during the 50s her look was a lot less appealing.

 

Jane Wyman (the worst casualty), Barbara Stanwyck, Lucille Ball and countless other 1930's / 40's cutie-pies & sex sirens all fell victim to the dreaded "Colbert Poodle Chop" in 1949 and never regained their sex-appeal.

 

Lucy at least was still able to show flashes of her former glory during the occasional skit on I Love Lucy. :D  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was not a happy camper when I first saw my favorite Barbara Stanwyck in that hairdo.  I loved her hair in the 1940's before then.  Fortunately her acting skills overcome the hair.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I liked the film and the ending.  It captured the doldrums of middle-aged men with the caution that adventure can lead to big trouble.

Excellent way of putting it.  :)

 

This sort of ending was put in with a purpose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was not a happy camper when I first saw my favorite Barbara Stanwyck in that hairdo.  I loved her hair in the 1940's before then.  Fortunately her acting skills overcome the hair.

 

Not only did Stanwyck (one of my personal favs as well) dive head first into Colbert Poodle Chop Hell, but she took it a step further & allowed herself to go prematurely gray. But you're right, Stanwyck's talent always came first. She still made some wonderful movies in the 1950's. Too many to name in even just her 1950's period alone!

 

And even with the premature gray & poodle chop, Stanwyck remained a very handsome woman who could still pull off femme fatale roles. Jane Wyman on the other hand, (who had previously been quite attractive) looked downright homely from the early 1950's on.

 

On a side note, has anyone else seen Stanwyck & Joan Bennett together in 'There's Always Tomorrow' (1956)? It's been several years for me but from what I remember it was quite an entertaining film. Stanwyck (gray poodle cut & all) took on the shady lady/other woman lead role, and Bennett supported as a conventional wife. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not only did Stanwyck (one of my personal favs as well) dive head first into Colbert Poodle Chop Hell, but she took it a step further & allowed herself to go prematurely gray. But you're right, Stanwyck's talent always came first. She still made some wonderful movies in the 1950's. Too many to name in even just her 1950's period alone!

 

And even with the premature gray & poodle chop, Stanwyck remained a very handsome woman who could still pulled off femme fatale roles. Jane Wyman on the other hand, (who had previously been quite attractive) looked downright homely from the early 1950's on.

 

On a side note, has anyone else seen Stanwyck & Joan Bennett together in 'There's Always Tomorrow' (1956)? It's been several years for me but from what I remember it was quite an entertaining film. Stanwyck (gray poodle cut & all) took on the shady lady/other woman lead role, and Bennett supported as a conventional wife. 

 

 

Yes!  I love "There's Always Tomorrow" and I've seen it on TCM a couple of times.  It would have been a good choice for the Postwar Melodrama theme TCM has going this month.  I said in another post that there seems to be always something going on underneath the surface of 1950's era domestic dramas.  That's how it was in the "real world", too, in the 1950's.  Art imitates life, or is it the other way around (rhetorical question)?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes,  Joan was beautiful and very stylish during the 40s,  but in 1949 she was 39 and that was often the kiss of death for an actress as it relates to being a romantic lead \ love interest of the leading male (who was often in his late 40s or even 50s!).    So I can hear the studio suits saying she should feel lucky that James Mason (who was 40) was sexually interested in her in The Reckless Moment.  I.e. if you don't get these mother roles you get no work at all. 

 

Love that hairdo line.   Yea,  many of those 50s hairstyles made the women look dowdy.   E.g. Jane Wyman.   She was featured yesterday in a film released in 1944 and she was very beautiful (and what legs),  but while she was a big star during the 50s her look was a lot less appealing.

Yes, I agree with your point about 1950s hairstyles.  Women's fashions changed in general, with longer and sleeker dresses. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us