kjrwe

The Woman in the Window: the ending (spoilers!!!)

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Obvious spoilers ahead...

 

I'm just wondering what others think of the ending of The Woman in the Window (1944)?

 

SPOILERS....

 

The ending is basically an "it's all a dream" ending. 

 

Generally I'm not a huge fan of this sort of ending, but the storyline was completed before the professor wakes up and I think that he learned a lesson from his dream about answering the "call of adventure" (or however he put it).

 

What are your opinions of the ending?

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Obvious spoilers ahead...

 

I'm just wondering what others think of the ending of The Woman in the Window (1944)?

 

SPOILERS....

 

The ending is basically an "it's all a dream" ending. 

 

Generally I'm not a huge fan of this sort of ending, but the storyline was completed before the professor wakes up and I think that he learned a lesson from his dream about answering the "call of adventure" (or however he put it).

 

What are your opinions of the ending?

I liked the film and the ending.  It captured the doldrums of middle-aged men with the caution that adventure can lead to big trouble.

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Love this movie (one of my all time personal favs) and love the ending. A large portion of the film is dark & gritty; so the twist ending comes as a welcome relief. And the way it's handled is completely believable! 

 

Off topic....I'm always amused at what a fox Joan Bennett still was in her Mid to Late 1940's Film Noir Vixen period. Her beautiful long brunette locks, fashionable clothes, bare midriffs, etc were very becoming. Shocking that only 5 years later (starting with the excellent The Reckless Moment in 1949) she was playing the mothers of young adults in dowdy peter pan collared blouses and that damn Claudette Colbert Poodle Haircut that many an actress fell victim to in the 1950's. *sigh*  :rolleyes:

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Love this movie (one of my all time personal favs) and love the ending. A large portion of the film is dark & gritty; so the twist ending comes as a welcome relief. And the way it's handled is completely believable! 

 

Off topic....I'm always amused at what a fox Joan Bennett still was in her Mid to Late 1940's Film Noir Vixen period. Her beautiful long brunette locks, fashionable clothes, bare midriffs, etc were very becoming. Shocking that only 5 years later (starting with the excellent The Reckless Moment in 1949) she was playing the mothers of young adults in dowdy peter pan collared blouses and that damn Claudette Colbert Poodle Haircut that many an actress fell victim to in the 1950's. *sigh*  :rolleyes:

 

Yes,  Joan was beautiful and very stylish during the 40s,  but in 1949 she was 39 and that was often the kiss of death for an actress as it relates to being a romantic lead \ love interest of the leading male (who was often in his late 40s or even 50s!).    So I can hear the studio suits saying she should feel lucky that James Mason (who was 40) was sexually interested in her in The Reckless Moment.  I.e. if you don't get these mother roles you get no work at all. 

 

Love that hairdo line.   Yea,  many of those 50s hairstyles made the women look dowdy.   E.g. Jane Wyman.   She was featured yesterday in a film released in 1944 and she was very beautiful (and what legs),  but while she was a big star during the 50s her look was a lot less appealing.

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Yes,  Joan was beautiful and very stylish during the 40s,  but in 1949 she was 39 and that was often the kiss of death for an actress as it relates to being a romantic lead \ love interest of the leading male (who was often in his late 40s or even 50s!).    So I can hear the studio suits saying she should feel lucky that James Mason (who was 40) was sexually interested in her in The Reckless Moment.  I.e. if you don't get these mother roles you get no work at all. 

 

Love that hairdo line.   Yea,  many of those 50s hairstyles made the women look dowdy.   E.g. Jane Wyman.   She was featured yesterday in a film released in 1944 and she was very beautiful (and what legs),  but while she was a big star during the 50s her look was a lot less appealing.

 

Jane Wyman (the worst casualty), Barbara Stanwyck, Lucille Ball and countless other 1930's / 40's cutie-pies & sex sirens all fell victim to the dreaded "Colbert Poodle Chop" in 1949 and never regained their sex-appeal.

 

Lucy at least was still able to show flashes of her former glory during the occasional skit on I Love Lucy. :D  

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I was not a happy camper when I first saw my favorite Barbara Stanwyck in that hairdo.  I loved her hair in the 1940's before then.  Fortunately her acting skills overcome the hair.

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I liked the film and the ending.  It captured the doldrums of middle-aged men with the caution that adventure can lead to big trouble.

Excellent way of putting it.  :)

 

This sort of ending was put in with a purpose.

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I was not a happy camper when I first saw my favorite Barbara Stanwyck in that hairdo.  I loved her hair in the 1940's before then.  Fortunately her acting skills overcome the hair.

 

Not only did Stanwyck (one of my personal favs as well) dive head first into Colbert Poodle Chop Hell, but she took it a step further & allowed herself to go prematurely gray. But you're right, Stanwyck's talent always came first. She still made some wonderful movies in the 1950's. Too many to name in even just her 1950's period alone!

 

And even with the premature gray & poodle chop, Stanwyck remained a very handsome woman who could still pull off femme fatale roles. Jane Wyman on the other hand, (who had previously been quite attractive) looked downright homely from the early 1950's on.

 

On a side note, has anyone else seen Stanwyck & Joan Bennett together in 'There's Always Tomorrow' (1956)? It's been several years for me but from what I remember it was quite an entertaining film. Stanwyck (gray poodle cut & all) took on the shady lady/other woman lead role, and Bennett supported as a conventional wife. 

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Not only did Stanwyck (one of my personal favs as well) dive head first into Colbert Poodle Chop Hell, but she took it a step further & allowed herself to go prematurely gray. But you're right, Stanwyck's talent always came first. She still made some wonderful movies in the 1950's. Too many to name in even just her 1950's period alone!

 

And even with the premature gray & poodle chop, Stanwyck remained a very handsome woman who could still pulled off femme fatale roles. Jane Wyman on the other hand, (who had previously been quite attractive) looked downright homely from the early 1950's on.

 

On a side note, has anyone else seen Stanwyck & Joan Bennett together in 'There's Always Tomorrow' (1956)? It's been several years for me but from what I remember it was quite an entertaining film. Stanwyck (gray poodle cut & all) took on the shady lady/other woman lead role, and Bennett supported as a conventional wife. 

 

 

Yes!  I love "There's Always Tomorrow" and I've seen it on TCM a couple of times.  It would have been a good choice for the Postwar Melodrama theme TCM has going this month.  I said in another post that there seems to be always something going on underneath the surface of 1950's era domestic dramas.  That's how it was in the "real world", too, in the 1950's.  Art imitates life, or is it the other way around (rhetorical question)?

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Yes,  Joan was beautiful and very stylish during the 40s,  but in 1949 she was 39 and that was often the kiss of death for an actress as it relates to being a romantic lead \ love interest of the leading male (who was often in his late 40s or even 50s!).    So I can hear the studio suits saying she should feel lucky that James Mason (who was 40) was sexually interested in her in The Reckless Moment.  I.e. if you don't get these mother roles you get no work at all. 

 

Love that hairdo line.   Yea,  many of those 50s hairstyles made the women look dowdy.   E.g. Jane Wyman.   She was featured yesterday in a film released in 1944 and she was very beautiful (and what legs),  but while she was a big star during the 50s her look was a lot less appealing.

Yes, I agree with your point about 1950s hairstyles.  Women's fashions changed in general, with longer and sleeker dresses. 

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"Woman In The Window" is one of my favorite movies of all time. Flawless noir gem. You have Robinson, Bennett, and Duryea directed by Fritz Lang - a noir dream team - how could it have been anything but great! It's the movie that made me a fan with noir movies as a kid seeing it on TV in the '70's. The ending stunned me. I loved it. "Scarlet Street" came after it with the same cast and is a very good noir, but not quite as good when compared to "Woman In The Window".

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He could walk off without being arrested because it was all a dream. Otherwise, he would have been arrested for sure.

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5 hours ago, kjrwe said:

He could walk off without being arrested because it was all a dream. Otherwise, he would have been arrested for sure.

Haha - my bad. I was thinking of the ending of Scarlet Street! I'll edit my original post. 

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8 hours ago, decojoe67 said:

Haha - my bad. I was thinking of the ending of Scarlet Street! I'll edit my original post. 

Hey everyone mixes up those two films given their similar cast.   What I find interesting is that Robinson plays characters that get away with murder more so than any other actor I can think of.   Scarlet Street is the primary one but he also does something similar in The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse (not a noir but a WB crime film with Bogie and the always welcomed Claire Trevor).

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I loved the movie. It's one of my favorite's of Robinson.  I hated the ending. It was purely Hayes Code.  It was very out of place and the director admitted it. The film was a masterpiece up to that point. It then turned into the Wizard of Oz.  It's a shame.

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I dunno. I'm kinda glad that this dear professor was given a second chance at dealing with the "call of adventure" (as he put it).

Even though the Hayes Code was in place, they could still have given it an ending outside of "it's all a dream". For example, the professor takes those pills and dies. His wife finds him like that when she returns from her holiday. (Maybe she had to return early for whatever reason.) Meanwhile, the woman in the window gets located somehow and gets arrested. They could have done it that way.

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10 hours ago, kjrwe said:

I dunno. I'm kinda glad that this dear professor was given a second chance at dealing with the "call of adventure" (as he put it).

Even though the Hayes Code was in place, they could still have given it an ending outside of "it's all a dream". For example, the professor takes those pills and dies. His wife finds him like that when she returns from her holiday. (Maybe she had to return early for whatever reason.) Meanwhile, the woman in the window gets located somehow and gets arrested. They could have done it that way.

I guess there are lots of ways it could've ended. You gave some examples.  My problem is it was soo jarring and out of place the way it ended. It still a great movie. I just feel that a ending more in line with the storyline would've made this a undeniable masterpiece. 

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At least they did complete the story before the professor woke up. That's the important thing. It's not like he woke up right when, in his dream, he's dumping the body or something.

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On 3/25/2018 at 7:15 PM, decojoe67 said:

"Woman In The Window" is one of my favorite movies of all time. Flawless noir gem. You have Robinson, Bennett, and Duryea directed by Fritz Lang - a noir dream team - how could it have been anything but great! It's the movie that made me a fan with noir movies as a kid seeing it on TV in the '70's. The ending stunned me. I loved it. "Scarlet Street" came after it with the same cast and is a very good noir, but not quite as good when compared to "Woman In The Window".

I'm the opposite.  I feel Scarlet Street is the better movie because of its ending. The ending of The Woman in the Window tore down everything that proceeded it. Let's compare it to the Wizard of oz. In that movie, you were dealing with a fantasy story. That made the dream at the ending FIT. In TWITW, you had a serious movie that was jolted at the end with a fantasy. It didn't  fit. This film could've gave Double Indemnity a run for perhaps the greatest  pure noir but fumbled it at the end.

 

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8 hours ago, Moorman said:

I'm the opposite.  I feel Scarlet Street is the better movie because of its ending. The ending of The Woman in the Window tore down everything that proceeded it. Let's compare it to the Wizard of oz. In that movie, you were dealing with a fantasy story. That made the dream at the ending FIT. In TWITW, you had a serious movie that was jolted at the end with a fantasy. It didn't  fit. This film could've gave Double Indemnity a run for perhaps the greatest  pure noir but fumbled it at the end.

 

It comes down to everyone having their own opinion of course. There is no definitive good or bad when it comes to any art-form including movies. I personally was stunned by the twist at the end of WITW as a kid. I also like the general scene-by-scene "feel" of WITW over SS. The photography, characters, and dialog seem to make it lean more towards an A movie IMO than SS. Also the "kind man being made a fool of" story makes SS a nastier movie IMO and one that makes me cringe. Bennett and Robinsons wife just make you want to reach in the screen and strangle them! A great Noir, but I personally have watched WITW twice as many times as SS.

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To those who really dislike the ending: skip it each time you watch the film. That's my personal suggestion.

I absolutely dislike the ending of The Pink Panther, even though it's one of my favorite films. I just skip the last 15 minutes of it each time I watch this lovely film.

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10 hours ago, kjrwe said:

To those who really dislike the ending: skip it each time you watch the film. That's my personal suggestion.

I absolutely dislike the ending of The Pink Panther, even though it's one of my favorite films. I just skip the last 15 minutes of it each time I watch this lovely film.

For the ending I just punch the mute button and play Laura by Nat King Cole on my IPOD,  because as we know it is only a dream.

 

 

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If I want to skip the ending, I just turn off the film. If I want to skip another part of a movie, I just fast-forward it. I don't have the patience to let the film play while I do something else.

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On 5/15/2018 at 1:50 AM, kjrwe said:

If I want to skip the ending, I just turn off the film. If I want to skip another part of a movie, I just fast-forward it. I don't have the patience to let the film play while I do something else.

I go get something to eat,  but I'll make up any reason I can find to listen to the Nat's version of Laura!   One of the greatest takes on one of the best written songs of all time.

  

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The film Laura has a lovely soundtrack. The film Sabrina has an even lovelier soundtrack. I'll check out the Nat King Cole version of Laura one of these days.

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