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rayban

"Deathtrap"

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The film version by Sidney Lumet is a great improvement over the stage play.

 

Despite the dire goings-on, he is able to incorporate pockets of unexpected humor.

 

The playwright, Ira Levin, had trouble with the ending of the second act.

 

In the screen treatment by Jay Presson Allen, she brings in the psychic, Helga Ten Dorp. during the climatic moments and then has her walk off with a successful play version of what she has been "seeing" and "experiencing".

 

THE KISS between Michael Caine and Christopher Reeve at the end of the first act explains everything - two secret lovers have concocted a clever scheme to get rid of Caine's wife and live off her money.

 

But, in the second act, the relationship is in trouble, because both men don't trust each other.

 

We don't see PASSION; we see FEAR.

 

But Caine is deadlier than Reeve - we can safely say that he has not become a committed homosexual.

 

But, once he senses that he is in danger, Reeve turns tricky, too.

 

But, finally, Reeve is no match for Caine's deceitfulness.

 

Lovers fall out - because one of them can't quite go over "to the other side".

 

The trouble here, though, is that Reeve is far too attractive to be a complete turn-off for Caine.

 

But Caine is probably too horrified at his supposed homosexuality.

 

Anyway, in the process, sadly, both of them DIE - one murders the other.

 

Yes, "Deathtrap" is far from the gay-friendly thriller that it appears to be.

 

When gay lovers fall in love and commit mayhem - to be together - the end result will probably be just as dire.

 

I would have liked to have seen more GAY PASSION between Caine and Reeve, but this film is about two men who only think that they are in love.

 

But the film version of "Deathtrap" is one hell of a ride!

 

michaelcainechrisreevedeathtrap1.JPG

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Excellent post, Ray. I'm glad you started a thread about this very fascinating film.

 

Not sure if they could make it today, since political correctness would dictate that one of them became more heroic in the end. To have two gay villains in a film now would be controversial.

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The film version by Sidney Lumet is a great improvement over the stage play.

 

Despite the dire goings-on, he is able to incorporate pockets of unexpected humor.

 

The playwright, Ira Levin, had trouble with the ending of the second act.

 

In the screen treatment by Jay Presson Allen, she brings in the psychic, Helga Ten Dorp. during the climatic moments and then has her walk off with a successful play version of what she has been "seeing" and "experiencing".

 

THE KISS between Michael Caine and Christopher Reeve at the end of the first act explains everything - two secret lovers have concocted a clever scheme to get rid of Caine's wife and live off her money.

 

But, in the second act, the relationship is in trouble, because both men don't trust each other.

 

We don't see PASSION; we see FEAR.

 

But Caine is deadlier than Reeve - we can safely say that he has not become a committed homosexual.

 

But, once he senses that he is in danger, Reeve turns tricky, too.

 

But, finally, Reeve is no match for Caine's deceitfulness.

 

Lovers fall out - because one of them can't quite go over "to the other side".

 

The trouble here, though, is that Reeve is far too attractive to be a complete turn-off for Caine.

 

But Caine is probably too horrified at his supposed homosexuality.

 

Anyway, in the process, sadly, both of them DIE - one murders the other.

 

Yes, "Deathtrap" is far from the gay-friendly thriller that it appears to be.

 

When gay lovers fall in love and commit mayhem - to be together - the end result will probably be just as dire.

 

I would have liked to have seen more GAY PASSION between Caine and Reeve, but this film is about two men who only think that they are in love.

 

But the film version of "Deathtrap" is one hell of a ride!

 

michaelcainechrisreevedeathtrap1.JPG

I always had trouble with the end

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Michael Caine's fear of his homosexuality - what it has made him do - causes him, I think, to turn on his lover, Christopher Reeve.

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In talking about this film on Sunday night, Ben Mankiewicz did not once mention the fearless performance of Christopher Reeve.

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