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Our Members Tributes to Robert Osborne (1932-2017)

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Fill the prime time line-up with movies Robert did wraparounds for in the past, since there must be thousands of those archived.  Front it with a themed intro graphic that makes it clear they're retro (so nobody mistakenly thinks, 'Robert's back! Yay!' (as I'd SO wished for until last night!) so to speak, as a tribute to the divine TCM past.  Something of nostalgic comfort to us, to put Mr. Osbourne back where he'd been for so long in our TCM lives, remind us why we loved him so much, would be heaven to this Osbourne fan, at least.

 

Welcome, tairaterces, to the boards.

 

I think that's a fine idea and, if I may be permitted to amalgamate it with a suggestion of my own earlier in this thread, marry those RO wraparounds to favourite films of his. That way we'd be watching films that we knew meant something to the man, as well.

 

It's would be a tribute to Robert Osborne I suspect that would have made the movie buff in him proud.

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What did he go from?

 

 

& I'm certain somebody on here will recall, he got a "Hollywood WOF-Star" a few years ago & in front of a theatre he admired.  R.J. Wagner=-(l930-) was present.  Who recalls when & where?

 

I know it was since the last time I was out there in 05 though.

 

Someone should also display it on here

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    Has anyone listed his favorite movies on here yet?

 

He picks 7 of Stanley Donen's   (*-indicates an *Oscar winner)

 

"A Place in the Sun"

"Random Harvest"

"Razor's Edge" (l946)

"0n the Town"

"Singin' In the Rain"

"Seven Brides for Seven Brothers"

"Funny Face"

"Indiscreet"

"Charade"

"Two for the Rode"

& he told Donen that "Arabesque" was a runner-up

 

& on that marvelous "Pvt. Screenings" with Alec Baldwin, Baldwin asked him the definition of drama & without pause he said "A Place in the Sun"

 

Comedy:
"Libeled Lady" & "Spinal Tap"

& Adventure: "Adventures of Robin Hood"

 

& both agreed on favorite actor: *William Holden-(TRIVIA: & both *Kevin Costner & Bill Murray also vote for him as their movie idol)

Cary Grant & *Jimmy Stewart were his others

 

Of the ladies:

Gene Tierney

*Bette Davis

& *0livia De Havilland-(of whom he told him he still spoke on the phone from Paris every Sunday)

 

JUST OMEMORE FACTS ON MR. OSBORNE

 

Strangely, none of the news listed how he died though?

 

To quote both *Coop & *Eastwood, "I reckon' TCM will repeat that special edition" 

 

 

& there used to be a TCM companion piece website-(not FB) by Mr. George Burdell, who even got to spend the day watching him do the show   Anybody recall it?

 

(P.S. Most have by now likely seen it, but you can still locate his tribute to NATALIE WOOD)

 

 

END OF AN ERA

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Jake,

 

I liked your post earlier about Robert's reluctance to watch A CLOCKWORK ORANGE. It reminded me of another thread on the message boards where people talked about films they walked out on.

 

I've stated before the only film I ever walked out on and requested my money back was ANGELA'S ASHES in January 2000. I told the theater manager how after twenty minutes, I realized the film was about poverty and was not going to pay for poverty. I have to laugh about it now, but I was very serious that afternoon at the southern California multiplex. I ended up going to see a comedy instead to escape the bleakness of Frank McCourt's story and laugh a little.

 

But maybe like Robert did with Kubrick's picture, I need to give ANGELA'S ASHES another try. It's been over seventeen years. Maybe I've changed, or maybe I haven't. Either way there is a film still waiting for me to see it all the way through from start to finish.

Was mixed when I reviewed "Angela's Ashes" (**1/2-out of four) but I knew *J. Williams score would once again ma contender cut

 

But, I've seen many a picture that made the folks in it seem almost wealthy  "Ironweed" (l987) for just one

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I think the thing that bothers me the most is that Robert Osborne never returned to the channel for a final goodbye party and formal tribute so he could really see how much all of his viewers an colleagues loved him. I'm sure he felt the love, but having him leave always with the faint promise of a return and then for him to die suddenly, it just all feels so incomplete.

I understand how you feel.  We kept looking for him to return.  However, we must remember that he had a personal life of his own and I'm guessing he wanted to have some privacy and not have the glare of a spotlight on whatever illness he had. Like most TCM fans we adored Robert and felt like he was part of the family so we missed seeing him and will always miss him.  I suspect he just wanted to quietly exit, stage left.  I believe he knew how much we all loved him.

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When I was about 9, my sisters and I would be left alone alot, especially at night.  We were scared, so learned to leave the t.v. on for company.  It was then I that learned about the "black and white old movies" that were better than anything else on t.v.  I couldn't learn enough about the actors and actresses, and when I was 14 found a huge coffee table book that listed every movie ever made, along with all the info for each participant in the movie and a synopsis.  I loved it.  Whenever someone needed info about a movie or actor, they were sent to me.  When I heard they were starting a network that showed the old movies without commercials, I was thrilled!  But then something better happened - the guy who was the host knew the little side stories that I craved, and he really knew his info, it wasn't read off a cue card, you could tell he really loved the movies like I did.  He knew the directors, knew about James Wong Howe, knew that Fred Astaire had a sister who he originally danced with.  Finally!  Someone I could relate to!  He was so personable and made you feel like he was talking directly to you.  When he hadn't been on the air for some time, I figured he was ill, I mean even though he seemed so young, he was in his 80's.  He spoke to Olivia DeHavilland every Sunday for the past 40 years, and I bet she is heartbroken and will miss those conversations very much.  I know I will miss him too, it's like I am losing a friend.  

Romanov,

 

Well said.  It is so for many of us that he felt like he was speaking directly to us - yes, so personable.  I thought, as you did, about Olivia deHavilland -- and as much as we will miss him, I can't imagine how difficult it will be for her.  He was one of a kind and like you, it does feel like losing a friend.

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    Has anyone listed his favorite movies on here yet?

 

He picks 7 of Stanley Donen's   (*-indicates an *Oscar winner)

 

"A Place in the Sun"

"Random Harvest"

"Razor's Edge" (l946)

"0n the Town"

"Singin' In the Rain"

"Seven Brides for Seven Brothers"

"Funny Face"

"Indiscreet"

"Charade"

"Two for the Rode"

& he told Donen that "Arabesque" was a runner-up

 

& on that marvelous "Pvt. Screenings" with Alec Baldwin, Baldwin asked him the definition of drama & without pause he said "A Place in the Sun"

 

Comedy:

"Libeled Lady" & "Spinal Tap"

& Adventure: "Adventures of Robin Hood"

 

& both agreed on favorite actor: *William Holden-(TRIVIA: & both *Kevin Costner & Bill Murray also vote for him as their movie idol)

Cary Grant & *Jimmy Stewart were his others

 

Of the ladies:

Gene Tierney

*Bette Davis

& *0livia De Havilland-(of whom he told him he still spoke on the phone from Paris every Sunday)

 

JUST OMEMORE FACTS ON MR. OSBORNE

 

Strangely, none of the news listed how he died though?

 

To quote both *Coop & *Eastwood, "I reckon' TCM will repeat that special edition" 

 

 

& there used to be a TCM companion piece website-(not FB) by Mr. George Burdell, who even got to spend the day watching him do the show   Anybody recall it?

 

(P.S. Most have by now likely seen it, but you can still locate his tribute to NATALIE WOOD)

 

 

END OF AN ERA

I'm confused where you say "7 of Stanley Donen's". The first 3 listed are not Stanley Donen films.

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When I was about 9, my sisters and I would be left alone alot, especially at night.  We were scared, so learned to leave the t.v. on for company.  It was then I that learned about the "black and white old movies" that were better than anything else on t.v.  I couldn't learn enough about the actors and actresses, and when I was 14 found a huge coffee table book that listed every movie ever made, along with all the info for each participant in the movie and a synopsis.  I loved it.  Whenever someone needed info about a movie or actor, they were sent to me.  When I heard they were starting a network that showed the old movies without commercials, I was thrilled!  But then something better happened - the guy who was the host knew the little side stories that I craved, and he really knew his info, it wasn't read off a cue card, you could tell he really loved the movies like I did.  He knew the directors, knew about James Wong Howe, knew that Fred Astaire had a sister who he originally danced with.  Finally!  Someone I could relate to!  He was so personable and made you feel like he was talking directly to you.  When he hadn't been on the air for some time, I figured he was ill, I mean even though he seemed so young, he was in his 80's.  He spoke to Olivia DeHavilland every Sunday for the past 40 years, and I bet she is heartbroken and will miss those conversations very much.  I know I will miss him too, it's like I am losing a friend.  

I'm curious about that coffee-table book about every movie ever made. What is the title? I would love to look for that.

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TCM will be honoring Robert Osborne with a 48-hour marathon of long-form Private Screenings and Live from the TCM Classic Film Festival interviews he conducted on Saturday, March 18 and Sunday, March 19. Highlights include:

 

  • Private Screenings interviews with Robert Osborne (conducted by Alec Baldwin), Debbie Reynolds, Betty Hutton, and Ernest Borginine;
  • Live from the TCM Classic Film Festival interviews with Eva Marie Saint, Peter O'Toole and Luise Rainer.
  • At 8:00PM on Saturday, March 19, TCM will be replaying, in its entirety, Robert Osborne's first introduction to Gone with the Wind, which was the first movie the channel aired on April 14, 1994.

 

For the complete lineup, visit: https://www.turner.com/pressroom/tcm-remember-robert-osborne-48-hour-tribute

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Was mixed when I reviewed "Angela's Ashes" (**1/2-out of four) but I knew *J. Williams score would once again ma contender cut

 

But, I've seen many a picture that made the folks in it seem almost wealthy  "Ironweed" (l987) for just one

THANX PER USUAL, DO YOU KNOW WHAT HE DIED FROM THOUGH? & EVER SEE THAT POWERFUL YET MUST RANK AMONGTHE TOP 5 ALL-TIME MOST DEPRESSING PIX "IRONWEED"

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I'm confused where you say "7 of Stanley Donen's". The first 3 listed are not Stanley Donen films.

 

 

The next seven are..........

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TCM will be honoring Robert Osborne with a 48-hour marathon of long-form Private Screenings and Live from the TCM Classic Film Festival interviews he conducted on Saturday, March 18 and Sunday, March 19. Highlights include:

 

  • Private Screenings interviews with Robert Osborne (conducted by Alec Baldwin), Debbie Reynolds, Betty Hutton, and Ernest Borginine;
  • Live from the TCM Classic Film Festival interviews with Eva Marie Saint, Peter O'Toole and Luise Rainer.
  • At 8:00PM on Saturday, March 19, TCM will be replaying, in its entirety, Robert Osborne's first introduction to Gone with the Wind, which was the first movie the channel aired on April 14, 1994.

 

For the complete lineup, visit: https://www.turner.com/pressroom/tcm-remember-robert-osborne-48-hour-tribute

 

 

Glad they are showing Betty Huttons'. Was hoping for Ann Miller too. That was another great one.......

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TCM will be honoring Robert Osborne with a 48-hour marathon of long-form Private Screenings and Live from the TCM Classic Film Festival interviews he conducted on Saturday, March 18 and Sunday, March 19. Highlights include:

 

  • Private Screenings interviews with Robert Osborne (conducted by Alec Baldwin), Debbie Reynolds, Betty Hutton, and Ernest Borginine;
  • Live from the TCM Classic Film Festival interviews with Eva Marie Saint, Peter O'Toole and Luise Rainer.
  • At 8:00PM on Saturday, March 19, TCM will be replaying, in its entirety, Robert Osborne's first introduction to Gone with the Wind, which was the first movie the channel aired on April 14, 1994.

 

For the complete lineup, visit: https://www.turner.com/pressroom/tcm-remember-robert-osborne-48-hour-tribute

Thank you for posting this!

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TCM will be honoring Robert Osborne with a 48-hour marathon of long-form Private Screenings and Live from the TCM Classic Film Festival interviews he conducted on Saturday, March 18 and Sunday, March 19. Highlights include:

 

  • Private Screenings interviews with Robert Osborne (conducted by Alec Baldwin), Debbie Reynolds, Betty Hutton, and Ernest Borginine;
  • Live from the TCM Classic Film Festival interviews with Eva Marie Saint, Peter O'Toole and Luise Rainer.
  • At 8:00PM on Saturday, March 19, TCM will be replaying, in its entirety, Robert Osborne's first introduction to Gone with the Wind, which was the first movie the channel aired on April 14, 1994.

 

For the complete lineup, visit: https://www.turner.com/pressroom/tcm-remember-robert-osborne-48-hour-tribute

Thank you for posting this!

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Sunset Boulevard was among Bob's favorite films.

Thanks for fast reply, your probably correct, but he never included it in his top 10-(is there a complete list somewhere?)

 

I'm 100% positive on the 7 he listed in there because he conducted a live before an audience interview-(may have been one of the "Film Fest.") with Stanley Donen-(l924-) & before Stanley even sat down he blurted out that 7 of his top 10 were his flix & then, Donen just pretended to get up & leave, as if the interview had concluded.

 

Because I have his-(among lots of other things Osborne, including something really cool he did 1 year for "31 Days of *Oscar" called "The Osbo's"

Where he listed films, performances,etc he thought actually deserved to win instead that particular year. Like the "Alternate *Oscars"

 

A couple examples, he woulda' voted for Mickey Rooney in "The Human Comedy" (l943-MGM) for Best Actor.  Judy Garland in "A Star is Born" (l954-WB's) as Best actress & even included songs he thought were more deserving.

 

Wish he woulda' done them every year.  However & strangely though, considering he wrote thee ultimate book, he predicted a couple yrs on air, but didn't do very well? :(

 

(P.S. If anyone is interested in that list of his own "0sbo's" let me know) B)  :(

 

& too bad he didn't write a book like Leonard Maltin's too-(that's something more to tip fans on, check out Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy.com & it also has a tribute.)

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I was very saddened about the loss of Robert Osborne. When I think of his smiling face and wonderful introductions to our favorite films, it is hard to bear. He also loved interviews with celebrities. So I join in the tribute here. THe fact that he had to cancel the recent TCM cruise made me aware that he was ill. May he Rest in Peace and he will be remembered fondly by the film world.

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I'm curious about that coffee-table book about every movie ever made. What is the title? I would love to look for that.

Me too! I would love to have one like that.

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Romanov,

 

Well said.  It is so for many of us that he felt like he was speaking directly to us - yes, so personable.  I thought, as you did, about Olivia deHavilland -- and as much as we will miss him, I can't imagine how difficult it will be for her.  He was one of a kind and like you, it does feel like losing a friend.

Yes, Robert Osborne was like a personal friend. I sensed this too. I felt directly spoken to a lot of the time. He was a wonderful host and will be sorely missed.

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Robert Osborne was the best kind of teacher, the kind who infected you with his own enthusiasm for the subject.  

 

It was the kind of connection that friends often have, the strong interest in the same things -- except that Bob was a friend whom most of us never met in person.  It didn't matter, though -- the friendship came through even without the personal connection, because Bob was there for us, and he knew that we were there for him.

 

The obvious affection that many Golden Age movie stars had for Bob says a lot about him.

 

I'd often watch one of Bob's Picks just because he chose it, and it was always worth the time.  And I was one of the many people who'd tune into a TCM movie just to see Bob's introduction, even if I didn't watch the movie itself.  Bob wouldn't want us to forget that TCM is about the movies, not him, but those movies won't be the same without his introductions.

 

I've gotten used to TCM without Bob, but that doesn't mean I won't keep missing him.

 

Thanks, Bob.

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Robert Osborne was the best kind of teacher, the kind who infected you with his own enthusiasm for the subject.  

 

It was the kind of connection that friends often have, the strong interest in the same things -- except that Bob was a friend whom most of us never met in person.  It didn't matter, though -- the friendship came through even without the personal connection, because Bob was there for us, and he knew that we were there for him.

 

The obvious affection that many Golden Age movie stars had for Bob says a lot about him.

 

I'd often watch one of Bob's Picks just because he chose it, and it was always worth the time.  And I was one of the many people who'd tune into a TCM movie just to see Bob's introduction, even if I didn't watch the movie itself.  Bob wouldn't want us to forget that TCM is about the movies, not him, but those movies won't be the same without his introductions.

 

I've gotten used to TCM without Bob, but that doesn't mean I won't keep missing him.

 

Thanks, Bob.

Someone at TCM should weed through "Bob's picks", choose the very best, and include them in the tribute.

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I understand how you feel.  We kept looking for him to return.  However, we must remember that he had a personal life of his own and I'm guessing he wanted to have some privacy and not have the glare of a spotlight on whatever illness he had. Like most TCM fans we adored Robert and felt like he was part of the family so we missed seeing him and will always miss him.  I suspect he just wanted to quietly exit, stage left.  I believe he knew how much we all loved him.

Very beautifully said. THough it would have been good to have Robert appear with a farewell party, maybe he felt that it was best to exit and not return. He did have a private life and was adored by many. That is very touching that he spoke to Olivia DeHavilland every weekend. I am sure she will miss his calls. So our wonderful friend had to leave us and I sincerely hope he will Rest in Peace. He will long be remembered for his brilliant introductions to the movies, his personable interviews, etc. Above all, he projected a great persona of caring for others. That is the greatest of all.

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TCM will be honoring Robert Osborne with a 48-hour marathon of long-form Private Screenings and Live from the TCM Classic Film Festival interviews he conducted on Saturday, March 18 and Sunday, March 19. Highlights include:

 

  • Private Screenings interviews with Robert Osborne (conducted by Alec Baldwin), Debbie Reynolds, Betty Hutton, and Ernest Borginine;
  • Live from the TCM Classic Film Festival interviews with Eva Marie Saint, Peter O'Toole and Luise Rainer.
  • At 8:00PM on Saturday, March 19, TCM will be replaying, in its entirety, Robert Osborne's first introduction to Gone with the Wind, which was the first movie the channel aired on April 14, 1994.

 

For the complete lineup, visit: https://www.turner.com/pressroom/tcm-remember-robert-osborne-48-hour-tribute

 

This is what gets bumped:

 

SATURDAY THE 18TH primetime theme with Burt Lancaster & Kirk Douglas movies

 

screen-shot-2017-03-07-at-2-56-18-pm.png

 

SUNDAY THE 19TH primetime theme of Ernst Lubitsch movies

 

screen-shot-2017-03-07-at-2-55-34-pm.png

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