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Barton_Keyes

June 2017 TCM Spotlight: Gay Hollywood

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TCM is loud and proud each Thursday night in June!

 

just+a+gigolo+c.+aubrey+smith+and+willia

​C. Aubrey Smith and openly gay actor William Haines star in JUST A GIGOLO, airing  June 1 on TCM.

 

June 1

​JUST A GIGOLO ('31)

​WATERLOO BRIDGE ('31)

THE WOMEN ('39)

​NO TIME FOR LOVE ('43)

​CHRISTOPHER STRONG ('33)

THERE GOES MY HEART ('38)

 

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​Monty Woolley plays himself opposite Cary Grant as Cole Porter in NIGHT AND DAY ('46), airing June 8 on TCM.

 

​June 8

​NIGHT AND DAY ('46)

​WORDS AND MUSIC ('48)

​ROPE ('48)

THE RAZOR'S EDGE ('46)

​A PLACE IN THE SUN ('51)

 

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​Rock Hudson, who for a time became the face of the AIDS crisis in the 1980s, stars opposite Jane Wyman in  ALL THAT HEAVEN ALLOWS ('55), airing June 15 on TCM

 

​June 15

​REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE ('55)

ALL THAT HEAVEN ALLOWS ('55)

​CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF ('58)

​NOWHERE TO GO ('58)

THE SEVENTH SIN ('57)

​LES GIRLS ('57)

 

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​Anthony Perkins, who died of an AIDS-related illness in 1992, got the role of a lifetime opposite Janet Leigh (briefly) in PSYCHO ('60), airing June 22 on TCM. 

 

​June 22

​GYPSY ('62)

BILLY LIAR ('63)

​SUDDENLY, LAST SUMMER ('60)

​PSYCHO ('60)

WEST SIDE STORY ('61)

 

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​Harvey Fierstein wrote and stars in TORCH SONG TRILOGY ('88), a gently nostalgic look at the problems the American gay community faced in the decade before the horrors of AIDS. Airing June 29 on TCM.

 

June 29

WHO'S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF? ('66)

​TORCH SONG TRILOGY ('88)

​ARTHUR ('81)

VALENTINO ('77)

​THE YEAR OF LIVING DANGEROUSLY ('82)

 

 

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Nice job Barton. I think there is some carryover (into the early morning hours on Fridays)-- so you may want to add those films, like SINCERELY YOURS with Liberace on the 16th; and CABARET, airing on the 30th.

 

I created a related thread in the LGBT sub-forum and notated gay & lesbian performers, directors, writers and composers to go along with the titles. I figured people would want to discuss the series there a little more in-depth.

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Nice job Barton. I think there is some carryover (into the early morning hours on Fridays)-- so you may want to add those films, like SINCERELY YOURS with Liberace on the 16th; and CABARET, airing on the 30th.

 

I created a related thread in the LGBT sub-forum and notated gay & lesbian performers, directors, writers and composers to go along with the titles. I figured people would want to discuss the series there a little more in-depth.

 

Duly noted -- I will incorporate those titles into this thread.

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SINCERELY YOURS is on???????? A dream come true! Have wanted to see this for years! :D

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SINCERELY YOURS is on???????? A dream come true! Have wanted to see this for years! 

 

It's based on an earlier George Arliss talkie, THE MAN WHO PLAYED GOD. I'd like to see TCM air both of them back-to-back one evening. It would make an interesting double feature.

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It's based on an earlier George Arliss talkie, THE MAN WHO PLAYED GOD. I'd like to see TCM air both of them back-to-back one evening. It would make an interesting double feature.

 

The Man Who Played God (1932) is a good film.    Arliss was very helpful to a, just getting started, Bette Davis.

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The Man Who Played God (1932) is a good film.    Arliss was very helpful to a, just getting started, Bette Davis.

 

Arliss was known for fostering younger performers that he'd seen in other things, by offering them jobs in his films. In addition to Davis, he gave Randolph Scott and Dick Powell much-needed opportunities early in their film careers.

 

Also, I was just reading last night about the great British actor-director-producer Anthony Bushell, whom Arliss spotted in a Broadway production in the late 20s. Arliss insisted Tony be cast as the young romantic lead in DISRAELI, opposite Joan Bennett. 

 

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TCM's June 2017 Spotlight on Gay Hollywood, coinciding with Pride Month, will be hosted by entertainment journalist Dave Karger. A former columnist for Entertainment Weekly, Karger is a frequent guest on NBC's Today Show​ and Access Hollywood​; Karger has also established himself as a leading authority on the history of the Academy Awards, a title he seems likely to inherit from the late Robert Osborne.

 

Karger has guest hosted TCM twice during the last year -- in July 2016 during TCM's Olivia De Havilland film festival, and in February 2017 during 31 Days of Oscar. He'll be back hosting TCM each Thursday night in June.

 

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Host Dave Karger will be joined each Thursday night in June by William J. Mann, the author and Hollywood historian.

 

Mann is the biographer of 1930s star William Haines, the first openly gay movie star. Haines stars in the film JUST A GIGOLO (1931), which kick's off TCM's celebration of Pride Month at 8:00PM EST on Thursday, June 1. Mann has also written biographies of Katharine Hepburn , Elizabeth Taylor, Barbra Streisand and director John Schlesinger.

 

For more information on this series, visit: https://www.turner.com/pressroom/tcm-filmstruck-celebrate-pride-month

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In this preview of TCM's Spotlight on Gay Hollywood, host Dave Karger and special guest William J. Mann discuss the career of William Haines, the first openly gay star in the movie industry:

 

 

The festival begins June 1 at 8:00PM EST.

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I watched both Just a Gigolo (1931) and Waterloo Bridge (1931). I felt Just a Gigolo was a little bit too forced in terms of humor and plot, but it's a great historic film that doesn't get as much notice as any other film of that year. Waterloo Bridge was a great film to watch, I remembered watching the film Gods and Monsters (1998) with Ian McKellen as James Whale, his performance as the director shows us his painful and multi-facted nature that makes you wonder what he could have been like in real life. Waterloo Bridge is a great picture to watch, from the beautiful character studies of the main characters in the film, the attention to dialogue spoken naturally by the actors, an early appearance by Bette Davis (in her last film for Universal) and Whale's commitment to the project since he knew about the war experiences himself during the First World War.

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Anyone else think this is wrong?

 

It just seems disrespectful to all these artists to shuffle them into a "spotlight" feature and ooo and aah over them being GAY.

 

Just saying....

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Anyone else think this is wrong?

 

It just seems disrespectful to all these artists to shuffle them into a "spotlight" feature and ooo and aah over them being GAY.

 

Just saying....

 

How is it disrespectful? You find being gay cause for loss of respect?

 

I found this spotlight to be ill-conceived, but not for the "reason" you give. It would have been preferable to use films that had gay and lesbian issues as subject matter, instead of just random movies that had gay people working on them in some capacity. As some else pointed out, if have a gay or lesbian person working on the film was the only criteria for inclusion then they could have shown just about any movie ever made.

 

But I have a feeling that if they showed 4 nights worth of movies with gay subject matter, the complaints around here would be even louder.

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How is it disrespectful? You find being gay cause for loss of respect?

 

I found this spotlight to be ill-conceived, but not for the "reason" you give. It would have been preferable to use films that had gay and lesbian issues as subject matter, instead of just random movies that had gay people working on them in some capacity. As some else pointed out, if have a gay or lesbian person working on the film was the only criteria for inclusion then they could have shown just about any movie ever made.

 

But I have a feeling that if they showed 4 nights worth of movies with gay subject matter, the complaints around here would be even louder.

I don't know. There's a few older LGBT themed movies that TCM has shown before that could be featured such as Suddenly Last Summer, Staircase and La Cage Aux Folles.

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I don't know. There's a few older LGBT themed movies that TCM has shown before that could be featured such as Suddenly Last Summer, Staircase and La Cage Aux Folles.

 

Oh, they could find enough movies, whether blatant or vague about the gay content. My point was that their would likely be more complaints about it. When there was the Women in Film spotlight, or any of the racial or religious spotlights, there have been complaints.

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Oh, they could find enough movies, whether blatant or vague about the gay content. My point was that their would likely be more complaints about it. When there was the Women in Film spotlight, or any of the racial or religious spotlights, there have been complaints.

 

If TCM decided to NOT show movies that had actual gay content because of complaints \ upsetting some of their audience and therefore just decided instead to just show films that had gay people working in \ on them;  well isn't that somewhat disrespectful to gay people generally as well as those gays in the industry?  

 

Anyhow that is how I interpreted the disrespectful comment by the prior poster.     Either way, I say if a network wishes to do such a spotlight, do it right and I think TCM missed the mark here.     

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If TCM decided to NOT show movies that had actual gay content because of complaints \ upsetting some of their audience and therefore just decided instead to just show films that had gay people working in \ on them;  well isn't that somewhat disrespectful to gay people generally as well as those gays in the industry?  

 

Only if you think being identified as gay is disrespectful. Did you find the Women In Hollywood spotlight to be disrespectful to women?

 

As I stated already, they should have scheduled films with gay and lesbian storylines or content rather than just spotlighting personnel. In fact, I think the best schedule would have been a mix, say, one night of gay male content, one night of lesbian content, one night of "implied" content or some other variation, and then one night spotlighting gay and lesbian filmmakers and/or performers.

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Only if you think being identified as gay is disrespectful. Did you find the Women In Hollywood spotlight to be disrespectful to women?

 

As I stated already, they should have scheduled films with gay and lesbian storylines or content rather than just spotlighting personnel. In fact, I think the best schedule would have been a mix, say, one night of gay male content, one night of lesbian content, one night of "implied" content or some other variation, and then one night spotlighting gay and lesbian filmmakers and/or performers.

 

I don't agree.   TCM was disrespectful to gays IF they were cowards that were unwilling to show films with gay storylines due to fear of push back from anti-gay people \ groups.

 

One can have this POV without being homophobic.   To me you're insulting people by implying that it is.  

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I don't agree.   TCM was disrespectful to gays IF they were cowards that were unwilling to show films with gay storylines due to fear of push back from anti-gay people \ groups.

 

One can have this POV without being homophobic.   To me you're insulting people by implying that it is.  

 

Well, I certainly wouldn't want to insult you.

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Well, I certainly wouldn't want to insult you.

 

Hey, sorry I did overacted but to me there is a different way to view what TCM is doing here (or really NOT doing). 

 

I just wish TCM would of had this spotlight focus on how gays are portrayed in film;   They could have started with what would be mostly negative and \ or stereotypically portrayal or films where the character is comes off as gay but isn't playing a gay character (e.g.. Laura).      Then TCM could have moved on to how Hollywood got some 'Bs' and gave more open and honest portrayals of gay characters.      I could have many films that would work well in this type of spotlight that TCM is NOT showing as part of their spotlight.

 

To me that would have been a more interesting spotlight than just films directed or starring actors that are gay. 

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To me that would have been a more interesting spotlight than just films directed or starring actors that are gay. 

 

That's what I was saying, too. I just didn't find what they did do as disrespectful, but rather that it was lazy. But laziness has been noticeable in a bit of their programming choices of late (I'm looking at you, TCM Underground).

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Very good point about Gay "issues" in movies---LOTS more plotlines, fascinating subtext stories to highlight (as well as they can, I assume), etc.

 

My beef with the GAY theme is that these Actors/Artists were real people, with real feelings, and many with children (and now) descendants.

 

They are not biological exhibits to be dissected in film class.

 

Many of these people (and they were of course, sensitive artists, gay or straight, to find success in film)

were LOATH to identify themselves as GAY.

I think we should respect that.

I think we should love/watch them for the unique people that they are, or we are missing the point of their art.

Thinking this way, simplifying the wonderful process of creating cinema, diminishes US.

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