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TCM spotlight on 'gay hollywood'-- June 2017

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I think that may be a bit of hindsight. Here's one of several sources -- a fascinating book about Disney:

 

Tinker Belles and Evil Queens: The Walt Disney Company from the Inside Out (NYU), by Sean Griffin.

 

"A number of actors and actresses who were closeted homosexuals worked on Disney films throughout the years -- Richard Deacon, Cesar Romero, Sal Mineo, Nancy Culp, Patsy Kelly. Yet it is precisely their secretiveness that kept them employed both at Disney and in Hollywood at large. For example, it is rumoured that Carlton Carpenter was originally considered for the role of Davy Crockett's companion but was eventually passed over because executives had heard that he might be homosexual."

 

I don't quite believe that. Most everyone who knew Deacon, Romero and Mineo knew they were gay. Culp was bisexual. Kelly was open back in the 40s, and it's why her screen career went into decline during the war years. In the 60s she was being hired again not because she had gone into the closet but because there was more acceptance. Her comeback film had another well-known lesbian-- Spring Byington who also costarred in PLEASE DON'T EAT THE DAISIES. So this tells me the casting directors were probably gay; and also Doris Day who had casting approval okayed these choices because Doris was pretty gay-friendly. 

 

The later films Kelly did at Disney were feminist stories-- meaning a bit of lesbianism was probably going to be included (since radical feminism tends to merge with lesbianism). And in one of those pictures Susan Clark was a lead; and Susan never came across as overly feminine. So again it's an openness to different types of femininity and masculinity, encouraged by the casting.

 

Griffin's book (and theories) don't really seem to look at the different factors and increasingly "gray" areas that occurred in the business, especially in terms of casting. It's too easy to say Kirk was gay and Walt was conservative and that derailed Kirk's career. In fact that is hindsight making such a sweeping generalization without looking at myriad other variables.

 

Personally I think Kirk was probably kind of a brat-- he didn't respect the top brass and play the game. If so, that's a bigger problem than one's sexuality. Especially in an industry where so many have always been gay or actively bisexual.

 

Incidentally I think the name of Griffin's book is (quite) a bit offensive. Instead of choosing something that sounded more scholarly, he went with a sensational title that actually promotes slurs against gay people. Archie Bunker would love it.

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There's a good article in THE DAILY BEAST about Johnathon Demme and his movie PHILADELPHIA (sorry I don't know how to bring to to this thread) for those who might be interested.

 

The title of the Griffin book was designed to titillate and sell copies.  I doubt the publishers cared whether it offended anybody or not.

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I don't quite believe that. Most everyone who knew Deacon, Romero and Mineo knew they were gay. Culp was bisexual. Kelly was open back in the tommy 40s, and it's why her screen career went into decline during the war years. In the 60s she was being hired again not because she had gone into the closet but because there was more acceptance. Her comeback film had another well-known lesbian-- Spring Byington who also costarred in PLEASE DON'T EAT THE DAISIES. So this tells me the casting directors were probably gay; and also Doris Day who had casting approval okayed these choices because Doris was pretty gay-friendly. 

 

The later films Kelly did at Disney were feminist stories-- meaning a bit of lesbianism was probably going to be included (since radical feminism tends to merge with lesbianism). And in one of those pictures Susan Clark was a lead; and Susan never came across as overly feminine. So again it's an openness to different types of femininity and masculinity, encouraged by the casting.

 

Griffin's book (and theories) don't really seem to look at the different factors and increasingly "gray" areas that occurred in the business, especially in terms of casting. It's too easy to say Kirk was gay and Walt was conservative and that derailed Kirk's career. In fact that is hindsight making such a sweeping generalization without looking at myriad other variables.

 

Personally I think Kirk was probably kind of a brat-- he didn't respect the top brass and play the game. If so, that's a bigger problem than one's sexuality. Especially in an industry where so many have always been gay or actively bisexual.

 

Incidentally I think the name of Griffin's book is (quite) a bit offensive. Instead of choosing something that sounded more scholarly, he went with a sensational title that actually promotes slurs against gay people. Archie Bunker would love it.

Tommy Kirk actually blames himself for the derailment of his career - he would not (could not?) control his appetites (drugs and boys).

 

Richard Deacon, a team player, if ever there was one, played Lumpy Rutherford's father on "Leave It To Beaver".

Edited by rayban
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Tommy Kirk actually blames himself for the derailment of his career - he would not (could not?) control his appetites (drugs and boys).

 

Richard Deacon, a team player, if ever there was one, played Lumpy Rutherford's father on "Leave It To Beaver".

 

I also remember Richard Deacon on THE DICK VAN DYKE SHOW.  As for movies, I remember his scenes in the original INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS.  I liked him.  Good supporting actor.

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TCM's spotlight begins tomorrow evening. Is everyone ready..?

 

screen2.jpg?w=678

 

Can anyone figure out which 12 people are featured in the ad? There are some I cannot identify--

 

Top row: Anthony Perkins; Clifton Webb; Mongtomery Clift; Farley Granger; George Cukor; ?

Bottom row: ? ; Dorothy Arzner? ; Dirk Bogarde; Raymond Burr; Rock Hudson; ?

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Can anyone figure out which 12 people are featured in the ad? There are some I cannot identify--

 

Top row: Anthony Perkins; Clifton Webb; Mongtomery Clift; Farley Granger; George Cukor; ?

Bottom row: ? ; Dorothy Arzner? ; Dirk Bogarde; Raymond Burr; Rock Hudson; ?

 

Top row, far right is John Gielgud.

 

Bottom row, second from left that you tentatively identify as Dorothy Arzner, is in fact actress Linda Hunt.

 

If you see the animated version of the logo on the TCM mainpage, it shows them unobscured for a moment, and I think the bottom left man may be Liberace.

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Top row, far right is John Gielgud.

 

Bottom row, second from left that you tentatively identify as Dorothy Arzner, is in fact actress Linda Hunt.

 

If you see the animated version of the logo on the TCM mainpage, it shows them unobscured for a moment, and I think the bottom left man may be Liberace.

 

Thanks Larry. I agree the bottom left is Liberace. We still haven't identified the bottom right.

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Thanks Larry. I agree the bottom left is Liberace. We still haven't identified the bottom right.

 

I thought it may be a young Douglas Sirk, but I'm not sure.

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I thought it may be a young Douglas Sirk, but I'm not sure.

I think that it is a very young Tennessee Williams.

 

The only person who was actually "out" was Tennessee Williams.

 

Dirk Bogarde remained closeted all his life.

 

Even with his autobiograhphies.

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I think you have it, good sir. Good eye!

 

26WILLIAMSWEB-tmagArticle.jpg

Thanks, LawrenceA.

 

There's a very amusing sequence in "Dreamboat" in which Clifton Webb rejects the sexual advances of Elsa Lanchester - but with such violence - "No, no, a thousand times, no!" - that is crosses over from just acting to THE VERY REAL.

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I think that it is a very young Tennessee Williams.

 

The only person who was actually "out" was Tennessee Williams.

 

Dirk Bogarde remained closeted all his life.

 

Even with his autobiograhphies.

 

Farley Granger came "out" later in his autobiography. Though he had relationships with women when he was younger.

 

Tony Perkins was bisexual. He had two sons. They could also have included Michael Redgrave and Marlon Brando if they were counting bisexual men with children.

 

I'm surprised they didn't put Tommy Kirk or Tab Hunter into the ad. 

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Farley Granger came "out" later in his autobiography. Though he had relationships with women when he was younger.

 

Tony Perkins was bisexual. He had two sons. They could also have included Michael Redgrave and Marlon Brando if they were counting bisexual men with children.

 

I'm surprised they didn't put Tommy Kirk or Tab Hunter into the ad. 

 

Tony Perkins fought all his life to be/go "straight".

 

However, he was married to a woman who liked/preferred gay men.

 

And, early in their marriage, she transformed herself in "a boy".

 

I agree, Tab Hunter should have been included in that line-up.

 

Tommy Kirk, too.

 

These are grievous omissions.

 

Marlon Brando?  Who cares?  Completely off-putting.

 

How about Vincent Price?

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How about Vincent Price?

 

Was Vincent Price ever linked to any men romantically? I have never heard anything along those lines.

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Given his screen persona, Vincent Price was at the very least - a bisexual.

 

Also, late in life, he married a lesbian.

 

That woman was Coral Browne.

 

Marrying a lesbian is always a dead giveaway.

 

How many men have done it - Edmund Lowe, Craig Stevens, etc.

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Gay Thursday - June 1, 2017

 

The moderators, Dave Karger and William J. Mann, were such a winning combo.

 

William J. Mann wrote an excellent book on gay Hollywood that was titled, "Behind The Screen".

 

The first film, "Just A Gigolo", was such a bad print - so dark - that it was impossible to make an informed assessment of this film.

 

I recorded it - and might see it again.

 

The second film, "Waterloo Bridge", was astonishing - Mae Clarke and Kent Douglas were a revelation.

 

James Whale's direction was just gorgeous.

 

I didn't see "The Women"; I have seen it so many times.

 

I recorded the others.

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Gay Thursday - June 1, 2017

 

The moderators, Dave Karger and William J. Mann, were such a winning combo.

 

William J. Mann wrote an excellent book on gay Hollywood that was titled, "Behind The Screen".

 

The first film, "Just A Gigolo", was such a bad print - so dark - that it was impossible to make an informed assessment of this film.

 

I recorded it - and might see it again.

 

The second film, "Waterloo Bridge", was astonishing - Mae Clarke and Kent Douglas were a revelation.

 

James Whale's direction was just gorgeous.

 

I didn't see "The Women"; I have seen it so many times.

 

I recorded the others.

 

Thanks for going over this, Ray. If they say anything worth repeating in the wraparounds, it would be good to mention it in this thread. I am surprised they didn't pick another William Haines film with a superior print.

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Thanks for going over this, Ray. If they say anything worth repeating in the wraparounds, it would be good to mention it in this thread. I am surprised they didn't pick another William Haines film with a superior print.

What was interesting in the first two wraparounds that I listened to - along with the first two films - was that BOTH William Haines and James Whale lived openly gay lives in early Hollywood.

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What was interesting in the first two wraparounds that I listened to - along with the first two films - was that BOTH William Haines and James Whale lived openly gay lives in early Hollywood.

 

Yes. It ended Haines' film career. He became an interior decorator. I don't know much about Whale's private life. 

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Given his screen persona, Vincent Price was at the very least - a bisexual.

 

Also, late in life, he married a lesbian.

 

That woman was Coral Browne.

 

Marrying a lesbian is always a dead giveaway.

 

How many men have done it - Edmund Lowe, Craig Stevens, etc.

 

Makes  perfect sense.  They can maintain the illusion of being straight to the public  They have their spouse's friendship and support but they don't have to sleep with them.

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Thanks for going over this, Ray. If they say anything worth repeating in the wraparounds, it would be good to mention it in this thread. I am surprised they didn't pick another William Haines film with a superior print.

 

The hosts were excellent; some of the best I've seen and they were quite interesting.  I watched as much of the wraparounds as I could and at least part of the movies.  I just love James Whale.  His theater design background in England really comes through in his American films.  I wish he had continued directing.  I caught the last half of the Haines film and yes, it wasn't the best print but at least the film survived.  Plus it was a talkie so we could hear his voice.

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The hosts were excellent; some of the best I've seen and they were quite interesting.  I watched as much of the wraparounds as I could and at least part of the movies.  I just love James Whale.  His theater design background in England really comes through in his American films.  I wish he had continued directing.  I caught the last half of the Haines film and yes, it wasn't the best print but at least the film survived.  Plus it was a talkie so we could hear his voice.

 

Have you seen the film The Great Garrick,  directed by Whale and starring Brian Aherne and Olivia DeHavilland?

 

I highly recommend this 1937 romantic comedy (which has many fine supporting players like Edward Everett Horton and Lionel Atwill).  One can see Whale's visual style in this fine film.   

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