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lydecker

The 100+ Club

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Marie Windsor is one of my favorites.  Has 170 credits, but a lot of them were for TV.

Would seem that it is more likely for men to make it to 100+ than women simply because fewer roles for "older" women than for older men.

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Marie Windsor is one of my favorites.  Has 170 credits, but a lot of them were for TV.

Would seem that it is more likely for men to make it to 100+ than women simply because fewer roles for "older" women than for older men.

 

Yep.  Men seem to have a huge advantage when it comes to film credits.  I can find literally dozens of male character actors who have 100+ but even the busiest female character actors fall short most of the time.  Which leads me to wonder . . . were  more men generally cast in a typical picture?  Certainly some genres (gangster, western, etc.) would be male dominated but not sure why others would be this way.

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Yep.  Men seem to have a huge advantage when it comes to film credits.  I can find literally dozens of male character actors who have 100+ but even the busiest female character actors fall short most of the time.  Which leads me to wonder . . . were  more men generally cast in a typical picture?  Certainly some genres (gangster, western, etc.) would be male dominated but not sure why others would be this way.

 

From going over the IMDB data the past 2-3 years, just some observations off the top of my head:

 

All the movies from all countries and time periods (episodic TV removed) came to about 75% men and 25% women (one entry per appearance per actor/actress).  Everything combined (TV episodes added back in) is 60% men and and 40% women. 

 

[I didn't learn this out of any interest for this metric, but rather I learned this out of pruning down the size of the giant data tables in the beginning - and the actors and actresses are in separate tables.  Later on when I refreshed them with newer IMDB data I didn't prune them.  So I had a chance to see this both ways.]

 

Just from a quick look at the list of IMDB titles, 67% are episodic TV (one entry for each TV episode), the remaining 33% being movies, made-for-TV movies, or something else.  Again this is for all countries and all time periods combined.  I could also change the ratio to show one entry per TV series (instead of one per every episode), but that would require a bit more time.

 

update:  quicker than I thought.  One entry per TV series (and other one-time TV shows) brings that ratio down to about 9.8% TV, versus 90.2% movies, made-for-tv movies, etc.

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[attachment=2082:Unknown.jpeg]Addison Richards

 

When it comes to being a member of the 100+ club, Addison Richards, with his good looks and his deep, “Voice of God” baritone was in a class by himself with 262 film credits and dozens upon dozens of TV credits.

 

Addison Whitaker Richards, Jr. was born in 1902 in Zanesville, Ohio where his grandfather was mayor.  He received degrees from both Washington State University and Pomona College and it was at college where he first discovered his love of acting. In 1931 Richards joined the Pasadena Playhouse where he worked his way up from being “simply an actor” to being its Artistic Director. 

 

His first film appearance was in “Riot Squad” in 1933 and he quickly became a reliable, indispensable character actor who could play everything from authority figures to amoral villains with ease.  He worked non-stop at all of the studios and did 17 films in 1935 alone.  Some of his films included: “Black Fury,” “Front Page Woman,” “Boys Town,” “Smart Blonde,” “Northwest Passage” and “The Pride of the Yankees.” Richards appeared in many of the mystery films series which were produced in the 1930’s and 1940’s such as Torchy Blane, Charlie Chan, The Lone Wolf, Ellery Queen and the Maisie series.  He had a recurring role in the Andy Hardy film series as “Mr. Benedict.” 

 

Starting in the 1950’s, Addison Richards was a frequent guest star on television (while concurrently appearing in films) and appeared on “Zane Gray Theatre,” “Kraft Theatre,”  “The Adventures of Jim Bowie” among many other shows. As the 1960’s came along, Addison Richards continued to act in both film and TV. Some of his TV appearances included: “Lassie,” “My Three Sons,” Bonanza” and “The Beverly Hillbillies.”  His last film appearance was in 1964 in “For Those Who Think Young” and he died of a heart attack that same year at the age of 61.

 

 

Coming Up Next:  Doris Lloyd

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attachicon.gifUnknown.jpegAddison Richards

 

When it comes to being a member of the 100+ club, Addison Richards, with his good looks and his deep, “Voice of God” baritone was in a class by himself with 262 film credits and dozens upon dozens of TV credits.

 

Addison Whitaker Richards, Jr. was born in 1902 in Zanesville, Ohio where his grandfather was mayor.  He received degrees from both Washington State University and Pomona College and it was at college where he first discovered his love of acting. In 1931 Richards joined the Pasadena Playhouse where he worked his way up from being “simply an actor” to being its Artistic Director. 

 

His first film appearance was in “Riot Squad” in 1933 and he quickly became a reliable, indispensable character actor who could play everything from authority figures to amoral villains with ease.  He worked non-stop at all of the studios and did 17 films in 1935 alone.  Some of his films included: “Black Fury,” “Front Page Woman,” “Boys Town,” “Smart Blonde,” “Northwest Passage” and “The Pride of the Yankees.” Richards appeared in many of the mystery films series which were produced in the 1930’s and 1940’s such as Torchy Blane, Charlie Chan, The Lone Wolf, Ellery Queen and the Maisie series.  He had a recurring role in the Andy Hardy film series as “Mr. Benedict.” 

 

Starting in the 1950’s, Addison Richards was a frequent guest star on television (while concurrently appearing in films) and appeared on “Zane Gray Theatre,” “Kraft Theatre,”  “The Adventures of Jim Bowie” among many other shows. As the 1960’s came along, Addison Richards continued to act in both film and TV. Some of his TV appearances included: “Lassie,” “My Three Sons,” Bonanza” and “The Beverly Hillbillies.”  His last film appearance was in 1964 in “For Those Who Think Young” and he died of a heart attack that same year at the age of 61.

 

 

Coming Up Next:  Doris Lloyd

 

 

Addison Richards is one of those guys who was just "there," always.  That insanely wonderful voice and impressive stature.  He had that presence that made him important and often "serious," but also very approachable.  Thanks for highlighting this great actor who is too often overlooked!  PS:  Having been brought up in upstate New York, I always connected with "Northwest Passage," one of his great roles! 

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[attachment=2083:dorislloyd.jpg]Doris Lloyd

 

Doris Lloyd was an English actress who was born in Liverpool in 1896.  She first appeared on stage with the Liverpool Repertory Theatre Company in 1914.  In 1915 Lloyd went to America to visit with her sister and ended up staying in the US permanently. For the next 10 years she appeared in a variety of plays on Broadway, most notably the Ziegfield Follies, and also acted in several touring companies. She appeared in her first film in 1925, “The Lady,” and from then on, concentrated on her film career, only appearing one more time on Broadway. She appeared in over 154 films over her long career, most often appearing as landladies, char women and society matrons.  Some of her more notable films included:  “Oliver Twist” (where she starred as Nancy,) “The Time Machine,” “Disraeli,” “Sound of Music,” “Midnight Lace” and “Mary Poppins.”  She appeared in several of the Tarzan films with Johnny Weissmuller and also voiced “The Rose” in “Alice in Wonderland” Doris Lloyd was very active in television in the 1950’s and 1960’s and was often cast in “Alfred Hitchcock Presents” along with other shows such as “Maverick” and “The Rogues.”  She retired in 1967 and died a year later at the age of 71. 

 

Coming up next:  Edward Brophy

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[attachment=2084:Unknown-1.jpeg]Edward Brophy

 

There was nobody quite like Edward Brophy --  Small of stature with a face simply made for comedy, from the minute he walked into a scene you just knew you were in for a very good time.

 

Edward S. Brophy was born on February 27, 1895 in New York City and educated at the University of Virginia. He intended to study law but decided he was more interested in acting as a career.  In 1918 he began showing up at Norma Talmadge’s New York film studio in the hopes of picking up some acting work. He managed to get some bit parts (his first film appearance was in 1920 in “Yes Or No”) but eventually switched to behind the scenes work, believing he could not make a living as an actor. He made his way to Hollywood and, while serving as a prop master for Buster Keaton’s MGM production unit, Brophy appeared in Keaton’s classic “The Cameraman.” Impressed by Brophy’s performance, Keaton cast Brophy in larger parts in two of Keaton’s talkies and by 1934, Edward Brophy abandoned production work to become a full-time actor.

 

Possessed of a chubby face with pop-eyes and a high-pitched voice, Brophy was a natural for comedies and appeared in over 130 films including:  “The Thin Man,” “A Slight Case of Murder,” “Evelyn Prentice,” “Tripoli,” and “The Last Hurrah.” Doing voice work as well as on-screen appearances, he was the voice of Timothy Mouse in Walt Disney’s “Dumbo,” was a frequent contributor to the popular radio series, “True Detective Mysteries” and also was the uncredited voice of Harry The Horse on radio’s "Damon Runyon Theater."  

 

In the 1950’s and 1960’s Edward Brophy, like so many other character actors, began appearing on television in such shows as:  “The Ann Sothern Show,” “The Millionaire” and “Mr. & Mrs. North." His last role was in John Ford’s “Two Rode Together,” dying during the production in 1960.

 

In an interesting bit of trivia, the sidekick character that Ron Carey played in Mel Brooks’ “High Anxiety” is named Brophy in tribute to Edward Brophy, who played dozens of sidekick roles during his long career. Doiby Dickles, sidekick to DC Comics hero Green Lantern, was also modeled after Edward Brophy.

 

Coming up next:  Emma Dunn

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There is an article in today's Washington Post about Philip Baker Hall who has 175 film and TV acting credits. I can't get the link to work properly.

 

Born in 1931, and still alive, his first acting credit is in 1970's Zabriskie Point. He is still acting today at age 85.

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[attachment=2086:Unknown.jpeg]Emma Dunn

 

The quintessential mother figure in film after film Emma Dunn always provided a charming, reassuring presence and was the consummate professional.

 

Emma Dunn was born in Cheshire, England in 1875.  By the time she was in her teens, she was already acting in local productions which eventually led her to the London stage and then on to Broadway. She appeared on Broadway in 1906 in “Peer Gynt,” working with Richard Mansfield and then starred in three productions for famed theater impressario, David Belasco. She was a very much in-demand stage actress.

 

For the woman who would play so many, many mothers in her film career, it was completely appropriate that Emma Dunn’s first film (in which she starred) was entitled “Mother,” produced in 1914 and directed by French film director, Maurice Tourneur. She made two more silent films before making her talkie debut in “Side Street” in 1924.  From that point on, Emma Dunn worked non-stop for all of the studios making 9 films in 1931 alone.  She was particularly adept with foreign accents, playing a variety of character with diverse nationalities including:  Irish, Italian, Spanish and American. Some of Emma Dunn’s 107 feature films include:  “The Guilty Generation,” “Broken Lullaby,” “Letty Lynton,” “Dr. Monica,” The Glass Key” and “Mr. Deeds Goes To Town.”  She appeared 7 times as Martha Kildare, mother of Lew Ayres aka "Dr. James Kildare” in the highly successful MGM Dr. Kildare series.

 

Emma Dunn was an author, as well as an actress, and wrote two books on elocution and speech:  “Thought Quality in Speech” in 1933  and “You Can Do It” in 1947. Her last film was “The Woman in White” in 1948 and she died at the age of 91 in 1966.

 

Coming up next:  Samuel Hinds

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[attachment=2098:Unknown.jpeg]Samuel S. Hinds

 

He played the quintessential gentleman; a thoughtful, principled authority figure in film after film.  It was an easy role for him to slip into, since in many ways, Samuel S. Hinds was, in real life, very much the same as the roles he played.

 

Samuel S. Hinds was born in 1875 and grew up in an affluent, educated family.  His father, Joseph Hinds, was a lifelong friend of Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain) and Thomas Alva Edison and owned and/or ran several successful printing and lithography companies. Hinds attended prep school and graduated from Harvard University and New York University Law School.  Like so many other future actors, he was bitten by the theatrical bug while in school, but to please his father, Hinds took up law as his profession, moving to California in 1908.  He settled in Pasadena where he quickly became involved in the theatrical productions being produced in the city, eventually becoming one of the founding members of the famed Pasadena Playhouse. By day, Hinds practiced law, while at night he was one of the Playhouse’s regular leading men. Some of his most notable appearances were in plays such as: “The Admirable Crichton,” “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” and, appearing with Paul Muni, “The Man Saul.” Hinds’ involvement with the Playhouse eventually brought him to the attention of film industry and he appeared in his first film, “The Amateur Gentleman,” in 1924.

 

1929’s stock market crashed wiped out most of Samuel S. Hinds’ fortune and he was forced to sell his beloved home in Pasadena. This life-altering event caused Hinds to abandon the practice of law for his first love, acting.  He said:  “I thought it was a good time to change my profession. I decided I would become a movie actor.  I had nothing to lose, for I had already lost everything.”  Almost immediately, Hinds’ talent and professionalism made him a very much in-demand character actor. In 1933 alone, he appeared in 22 films. Samuel S. Hinds (sometimes billed as Samuel Hinds, no middle initial) appeared in over 200 films over the course of his career. Some of his more memorable roles were in films such as: “You Can’t Take It With You,” “Gabriel Over The White House,” “Rendezvous” and “It’s A Wonderful Life.”  He was perhaps best known for his recurring role as kindly “Dr. Stephen Kildare,” (father of the main character) in the popular MGM “Dr. Kildare” film series.  In 1940, Hinds joined with fellow actors, Dana Andrews, Moroni Olsen, Lloyd Nolan and others to form 18 Actors Inc., a professional acting company which performed in plays throughout Southern California.  Hinds worked up until the very end, dying in 1948 at the age of 73. His last film was “The Bribe,” released in 1949. 

 

In an interesting bit of trivia  --  Samuel S. Hind’s Pasadena home (which he was forced to sell after the Wall Street Crash) is a much sought after location used in TV and film production, most recently seen in AMC’s “Mad Men.”

 

  

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[attachment=2104:images-1.jpeg]Louise Beavers

 

Louise Beavers was a trailblazer for black movie actors but she also dealt with a great deal of criticism for the roles she played.  She worked at a time when talented African-American actors were, for the most part, only given the opportunity to play servile characters.  She once remarked: “As long as the plays are being written and produced for whites by whites, there will be the same chance for criticism.” Yet, she persevered for 33 years and gave 124 fine films performances which we still enjoy today. 

 

Louise Beavers was born in Cincinnati in 1902 but moved to Pasadena with her family when she was 11.  Her mother, a voice teacher, had hopes that Louise would sing in concert halls but, instead, after graduating from Pasadena High School, Louise joined a group of young women singers called the “Lady Minstrels.”  Charles Butler of Central Casting (who was well known as an agent for African-American actors) saw Louise perform and suggested she audition for work in films.  There is some dispute about which film was Louise Beavers’ first  -- 1923’s “Gold Diggers” or 1927’s “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” but Beavers’ first performance of note was in 1929’s “Coquette,” playing Mary Pickford’s nanny in the film. Film buffs like to point out that Louise Beavers was actually 10 years younger than Pickford (!) when she played her “old” nanny.

 

Beavers’ role of a lifetime came in 1934 as Delilah Johnson in “Imitation of Life.”  Rather than being relegated to the sidelines, Louise Beavers shared the screen equally with Claudette Colbert as they played two young mothers struggling to raise their daughters.  It is Delilah Johnson’s famous pancake recipe which propels the women from rags to riches.  Louise Beavers finally had a three dimensional, dramatic role to play and she made the most of it, pretty much stealing the film from Claudette Colbert.  Many film scholars believe that this breakout role ruined any chance Beavers might have had to appear in even more significant parts for one simple reason  -- As Hollywood gossip columnist, Jimmie Fidler said:  “She was too good! Any actress who can steal a picture away from Miss Colbert will be given few chances to steal from other stars.”  Louise Beavers had been considered, far and away, the leading candidate to play Mammy in “Gone With The Wind” but the role instead went to Hattie McDaniel (who in turn nearly stole that film from Vivien Leigh and Clark Gable!)  While Louise Beavers continued to be a very busy actress, she never was offered a part as important as Delilah Johnson by a major studio again. Louise Beavers did appear as the lead actress in a pair of films produced by Million Dollar Productions, a company which specialized in films featuring all African-American casts,  “Life Goes On” (1938)  and “Reform School" (1939) but the distribution of those films was limited.

 

Beavers continued to work steadily through the 1940’s and 1950’s in such films as “Shadow of the Thin Man,” No Time for Comedy,” “DuBarry Was A Lady” and “Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House.”  In 1952 Louise Beavers took over for an ailing Hattie McDaniel, starring in the TV Show “Beulah” for 2 seasons.  She then took on the role as the tart tongued housekeeper, Louise, (often stealing scenes from Danny Thomas) in “”Make Room For Daddy.” Her last film role was in 1960 in “The Facts of Life” and she died two years later at the age of 60. In 1976 Louise Beavers was posthumously inducted into the Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame.

 

 

Coming up next:  Ward Bond

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[attachment=2170:wardbond.jpg]Ward Bond

 

He was everywhere in film (227 films!) and played down-to-earth, solid American men  -- cowboys, cops, cabbies, soldiers and more.  He also, more often than not, showed up in film as a good buddy of John Wayne’s, a part which he also played in life.

 

Ward Bond was born in Nebraska in 1903.  In the 1920’s, while attending the University of Southern California, he met John Wayne, who, like Bond, played on the USC football team.  In 1929, Bond, Wayne and the entire USC team were hired to appear as extras in a football film, “Salute,” which was directed by John Ford.  Ford, Bond and Wayne forged a friendship which lasted all of their lifetimes.

 

Once Ward Bond became an actor, he never stopped.  In 1934 he appeared in 21 films, in 1935, he appeared in 25 and was, year after year, always in demand as a reliable character actor.  Ward Bond, astonishingly, appeared in 11 films which were nominated for Best Picture (which may be a record) including:  “Arrowsmith,” “Lady for a Day,” “It Happened One Night,” “The Maltese Falcon,” It’s A Wonderful Life,” and, of course, “Gone With The Wind.”  Bond appeared in some bit parts but was generally used as a major supporting player.  Some of his more memorable characters were John L. Sullivan in “Gentleman Jim,” Detective Tom Polhaus in “The Maltese Falcon” and Bert, the Cop in “It’s A Wonderful Life.”  Ward Bond was a polarizing figure, a man of strong opinions and was either loved or hated by those who knew him. He was an ardent anti Communist and strongly approved of the activities of the House Un-American Activities Committee. Because of this, for many years after the Committee Hearings, Bond was only hired to work in films with John Wayne (who was of a like political persuasion.)

 

Like many other character actors, when the studio system was phasing out in the 1950’s, Ward Bond moved to television where he found new fame. At 54, he made a major comeback as Major Seth Adams (finally, a leading role!) in the western series, “Wagon Train.”  A whole new generation suddenly discovered the talents of Ward Bond. Bond appeared in 133 episodes of the show and, though he had been warned by his doctors to cut back on his schedule, he continued to work steadily.  Ward Bond died of a heart attack at age 57. His good friend and frequent co-star, John Wayne delivered his eulogy.

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attachicon.gifwardbond.jpgWard Bond

 

He was everywhere in film (227 films!) and played down-to-earth, solid American men  -- cowboys, cops, cabbies, soldiers and more.  He also, more often than not, showed up in film as a good buddy of John Wayne’s, a part which he also played in life.

 

Ward Bond was born in Nebraska in 1903.  In the 1920’s, while attending the University of Southern California, he met John Wayne, who, like Bond, played on the USC football team.  In 1929, Bond, Wayne and the entire USC team were hired to appear as extras in a football film, “Salute,” which was directed by John Ford.  Ford, Bond and Wayne forged a friendship which lasted all of their lifetimes.

 

Once Ward Bond became an actor, he never stopped.  In 1934 he appeared in 21 films, in 1935, he appeared in 25 and was, year after year, always in demand as a reliable character actor.  Ward Bond, astonishingly, appeared in 11 films which were nominated for Best Picture (which may be a record) including:  “Arrowsmith,” “Lady for a Day,” “It Happened One Night,” “The Maltese Falcon,” It’s A Wonderful Life,” and, of course, “Gone With The Wind.”  Bond appeared in some bit parts but was generally used as a major supporting player.  Some of his more memorable characters were John L. Sullivan in “Gentleman Jim,” Detective Tom Polhaus in “The Maltese Falcon” and Bert, the Cop in “It’s A Wonderful Life.”  Ward Bond was a polarizing figure, a man of strong opinions and was either loved or hated by those who knew him. He was an ardent anti Communist and strongly approved of the activities of the House Un-American Activities Committee. Because of this, for many years after the Committee Hearings, Bond was only hired to work in films with John Wayne (who was of a like political persuasion.)

 

Like many other character actors, when the studio system was phasing out in the 1950’s, Ward Bond moved to television where he found new fame. At 54, he made a major comeback as Major Seth Adams (finally, a leading role!) in the western series, “Wagon Train.”  A whole new generation suddenly discovered the talents of Ward Bond. Bond appeared in 133 episodes of the show and, though he had been warned by his doctors to cut back on his schedule, he continued to work steadily.  Ward Bond died of a heart attack at age 57. His good friend and frequent co-star, John Wayne delivered his eulogy.

 

Thanks for this!  I loved Bond in The Maltese Falcon.  He played such a wonderful world-weary cop and was a great counterpoint to Bogart.  Oddly, though I grew up in the era, for some reason all I remember about Wagon Train is "20 Mule Team Borax!"

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Thanks for this!  I loved Bond in The Maltese Falcon.  He played such a wonderful world-weary cop and was a great counterpoint to Bogart.  Oddly, though I grew up in the era, for some reason all I remember about Wagon Train is "20 Mule Team Borax!"

 

Actually overeasy, I'm pretty sure "20 Mule Team Borax" sponsored the program Death Valley Days, not Wagon Train.

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RIght you are, Dargo. 20 Mule Team Borax (what a name for a product!) sponsored "Death Valley Days" which, for a while, was apparently hosted by our former president, Ronald Reagan.  In case anyone is dying to know more about 20 Mule Team Borax (stop the presses) here's a link:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/20_Mule_Team_Borax

 

Which makes me wonder . . . who was the sponsor of "Wagon Train?" 

 

L

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RIght you are, Dargo. 20 Mule Team Borax (what a name for a product!) sponsored "Death Valley Days" which, for a while, was apparently hosted by our former president, Ronald Reagan.  In case anyone is dying to know more about 20 Mule Team Borax (stop the presses) here's a link:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/20_Mule_Team_Borax

 

Which makes me wonder . . . who was the sponsor of "Wagon Train?" 

 

L

 

According to this website, Wagon Train was for many years sponsored by the Ford Motor Co...

 

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/135671007497701214/

 

(...although I would've put my money on somebody like Winston Cigarettes, as it seemed at least half the programs back then were sponsored by some large tobacco concern)

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