jakeem

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3 great actors born on March 31st!

 

Ewan McGregor- 46

 

Christopher Walken- 74

 

Richard Chamberlain- 83

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...Jane Powell (born Suzanne Lorraine Burce on April 1, 1929), the singing and dancing star of numerous Hollywood musicals in the 1940s and 1950s. She was signed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer as a teenager, which led to roles in such musical productions as "Song of the Open Road" (1944), "Holiday in Mexico" (1946), "Three Daring Daughters" (1948, in which she held her own with Jeanette MacDonald) and "A Date with Judy" (1948, with Wallace Beery and Elizabeth Taylor).

 

When June Allyson was unavailable because of a pregnancy, Powell took over the role of Fred Astaire's sister and dance partner in the 1951 musical "Royal Wedding." Her other films included "Rich, Young and Pretty" (1951), "Small Town Girl" (1953), "Three Sailors and a Girl" (1953), "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" (1954) and "Hit the Deck" (1955).  

 

Powell was married to the former child star Dick Moore from 1992 until his death in 2015.

 


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My favorite Jane Powell performance from the same film ( A Date With Judy)

 

 

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Shirley Jones has told a great story about that "Til There was You" scene.  She was halfway through a pregnancy when it was filmed and as Robert Preston and she embraced and kissed the future Mr. Cassidy kicked so hard that Preston felt it. Who knew that kids could be chaperones?   

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...Academy Award winner Linda Hunt (born April 2, 1945). On April 9, 1984, she became the first person to receive an Oscar for playing someone of the opposite gender. She won the 1983 Best Supporting Actress award for her performance as Asian photographer Billy Kwan in "The Year of Living Dangerously." Directed by Peter Weir and headlined by Mel Gibson and Sigourney Weaver, the film focused on foreign correspondents covering an uprising in Indonesia in 1965.

 

Hunt made her film debut in Robert Altman's live-action version of "Popeye" (1980), which starred Robin Williams. Among her other movies: "The Bostonians (1984), "Dune" (1984), "Silverado" (1985), "Eleni" (1985), "She-Devil" (1989), "Kindergarten Cop" (1990), "Dragonfly"(2002), "Yours Mine and Ours" (2005) and "Stranger Than Fiction" (2006). 

 

For the past eight seasons, she has starred as Henrietta "Hetty" Lange, the enigmatic, tea-loving operations chief in the CBS drama series "NCIS: Los Angeles."

 

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...Eddie Murphy (born April 3, 1961), the former "Saturday Night Live" star who became a major film star and stand-up comedian. The New York product joined SNL as a featured player at the age of 19. He soon became a regular and a sensation, thanks in part to his impersonations of such notables as James Brown, Stevie Wonder, Bill Cosby, Mr. T, Buckwheat of "The Little Rascals" and Gumby. 
 
He made his film debut opposite Nick Nolte in the hit action film "48 HRS." Two years later, he was a solo headliner in "Beverly Hills Cop," the summer blockbuster that spawned two sequels. Among his other pictures: "Trading Places" (1983), "The Golden Child" (1986), "Eddie Murphy Raw" (1987, a stand-up comedy concert film), "Coming to America" (1988), and "Harlem Nights" (1989, his directorial debut that teamed him with Richard Pryor and Redd Foxx).
 
Murphy also starred in a 1996 remake of Jerry Lewis' "The Nutty Professor" (followed by a sequel), as well as 1998 and 2001 versions of "Dr. Dolittle." He also provided voices for the animated films "Mulan" (1998) and "Shrek" (2001, followed by two sequels). 
 
He earned a Best Supporting Actor nomination for his dramatic performance as the tragic soul singer James "Thunder" Early in the 2006 screen version of the Broadway musical "Dreamgirls."
 
Murphy even had a few minutes of fame as a recording artist. His 1985 song "Party All the Time" -- co-written and co-produced by funk artist Rick James -- reached the No. 2 spot on Billboard's pop chart.
 
In October 2015 at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., Murphy became the 18th person to receive the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor (pictured below).
 

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 ...Robert Downey, Jr. (born April 4, 1965), who overcame struggles with substance abuse and became a bankable movie star through his roles as the ultimate sleuth Sherlock Holmes and Tony Stark/Iron Man in several Marvel Universe blockbusters. Forbes magazine proclaimed him the world's highest-paid actor three years in a row, thanks to his earnings of $75 million (2012-2013), $75 million (2013-2014) and $80 million (2014-2015). He dropped to eighth place in the latest survey because he only starred in one film -- 2016's "Captain America: Civil War" -- for a total of $33 million.
 
The son of the underground filmmaker Robert Downey, Sr. ("Putney Swope") began his career in pictures directed by his father in the early 1970s. A decade later, he became a peripheral member of "The Brat Pack" with appearances in such youth-oriented movies as "Baby It's You" (1983), "Girls Just Want to Have Fun" (1985), "Weird Science" (1985), "Back to School" (1986) and "Less Than Zero" (1987). 
 
He earned a 1992 Academy Award nomination for Best Actor in "Chaplin." Sir Richard Attenborough's biopic about film great Sir Charles Chaplin. But his career was short-circuited later in the 1990s by substance abuse problems that led to several rehab programs and a one-year prison term. 
 
After becoming sober in 2003, Downey redeemed himself with meaty roles in such films as "Kiss Kiss Bang Bang" (2005), "Good Night and Good Luck" (2005) and "Zodiac" (2007). Then he enjoyed mega-stardom with the Marvel series and two "Sherlock Holmes" films. He also received a 2008 Oscar nomination as Best Supporting Actor for his performance as an Australian method actor in the hit comedy "Tropic Thunder." 
 
He will appear as Stark/Iron Man in "Spider-Man: Homecoming," which opens on July 7, 2017.
 

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...actress Jane Asher (born April 5, 1946), the onetime British child star who became the envy of females here, there and everywhere during the 1960s because of her relationship with Beatle Paul McCartney. A London native, she is the younger sister of Peter Asher, who was one-half of the pop duo Peter and Gordon before emerging as an influential record producer and label czar. 

 
Among her film appearances: "Mandy" (1952), "The Quatermass Xperiment" (1955), "Loss of Innocence (1961, also known as "The Greengage Summer"), "The Masque of the Red Death" (1964, directed and co-produced by Roger Corman), "Alfie" (1966, with Sir Michael Caine), "Deep End (1970) and "Dreamchild" (1985).  
 
She became involved with McCartney after interviewing The Beatles in 1963. The couple was together for five years.
 
Among the songs by The Beatles said to have been inspired by Asher: "And I Love Her," "Things We Said Today," "Every Little Thing," "We Can Work It Out," "You Won't See Me," "I'm Looking Through You," "Honey Pie" and "Here, There And Everywhere."   
 
Asher has been married to the famed political cartoonist and illustrator Gerald Scarfe since 1981. They are the parents of three children. Although she has become known for her books about making cakes, Asher continues to act. She appeared in the acclaimed 2013 BBC miniseries "Dancing on the Edge," which also starred Chiwetel Ejiofor, Matthew Goode, John Goodman, Jacqueline Bisset and Jenna Coleman. 
 
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...actor Billy Dee Williams (born April 6, 1937), who became a screen sex symbol in "Lady Sings the Blues" (1972) and a "Star Wars" icon as Lando Calrissian in Episodes V and VI. His first noteworthy role was in the 1971 made-for-television movie "Brian's Song," in which he portrayed Chicago Bears great Gale Sayers opposite James Caan as Sayers' doomed teammate Brian Piccolo. The ABC production won three Primetime Emmy Awards, including Best  

Dramatic Progam. Both Williams and Caan were nominated for Outstanding Single Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role.
 
A year later, Williams wowed movie audiences with his performance in "Lady Sings the Blues," the Motown-produced screen biography starring Diana Ross as the talented but ill-fated jazz singer Billie Holiday (1915-1959). He portrayed Holiday's third husband, Louis McKay.
 
Williams made his first appearance in the "Star Wars" universe in "The Empire Strikes Back" (1980) as the roguish Calrissian, Han Solo's former running buddy and the leader of the planet Bespin's Cloud City. Calrissian was the original owner of The Millennium Falcon, but lost it to Solo in a card game. The character returned in a heroic capacity in "Return of the Jedi" (1983).
 
Williams provided the voices of Harvey Dent and Two Face for the current computer-animated film "The Lego Batman Movie" (he played Dent -- but not Two Face -- in Tim Burton's 1989 hit "Batman"). The 2017 production has earned $297,237,542 million worldwide, according to boxofficemojo.com.
 
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How about a mention of Billy's film debut in THE LAST ANGRY MAN in 1957.

 

And actress MARILU HENNER who turns 65 today.

 

 

Sepiatone

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...the five-time Academy Award-winning filmmaker, maverick, entrepreneur and vintner Francis Ford Coppola (born April 7, 1939). He was one of many young directors who cut their professional teeth working for the great independent producer Roger Corman. Coppola's early films included "Dementia 13" (1963), "You're a Big Boy Now" (1966), "Finian's Rainbow" (1968, a musical starring Fred Astaire) and "The Rain People" (1969).

 

In 1971, he received his first Oscar -- a 1970 Best Original Screenplay award (shared with Edmund H. North) for "Patton." His second came two years later, as he and Mario Puzo won a Best Adapted Screenplay award for "The Godfather," the film that was named Best Picture of 1972. Coppola lost the Best Director award to Bob Fosse of "Cabaret."

 


In 1975, two of Coppola's films competed for Best Picture of 1974 honors at the 47th Academy Awards. The winner that year was Coppola's "The Godfather Part II," which won over his film about electronic surveillance, "The Conversation." Coppola became one the few directors to have had two films nominated for the top Oscar in the same year. Others who have accomplished the feat: 


  • Ernst Lubitsch (1931/32) -- "One Hour with You" (co-directed with George Cukor) and "The Smiling Lieutenant."
  • Jack Conway (1936) -- "Libeled Lady" and "A Tale of Two Cities."
  • Michael Curtiz (1938) -- "The Adventures of Robin Hood" (co-directed with William Keighley) and "Four Daughters." 
  • Victor Fleming (1939) -- "Gone With the Wind" (won Best Picture and Best Director) and "The Wizard of Oz." 
  • Sir Alfred Hitchcock (1940) -- "Rebecca" (won Best Picture) and "Foreign Correspondent."
  • John Ford (1940) -- "The Grapes of Wrath" (won Best Director) and "The Long Voyage Home."
  • Sam Wood (1940) -- "Kitty Foyle" and "Our Town."
  • Wood (1942) -- "Kings Row" and "The Pride of the Yankees."
  • Herbert Ross (1977) -- "The Goodbye Girl" and "The Turning Point."
  • Steven Soderbergh (2000) -- "Traffic" (won Best Director) and "Erin Brockovich."


Coppola won three Academy Awards for "The Godfather Part II" -- as a director, producer and screenwriter (he again shared the Best Adapted Screenplay Oscar with Puzo). 

 

Five years later, he received three Oscar nominations -- for directing, producing and co-adapting the screenplay for the dark Vietnam tale "Apocalypse Now." Filming the movie in the Philippines was an ordeal. Coppola's wife Eleanor collaborated with filmmakers Fax Bahr and George Hickenlooper on a 1991 documentary about the production titled "Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse."

 

In 1991, "The Godfather Part III" became Coppola's fifth film to be nominated for Best Picture. The 1990 release also earned him Oscar nods as a director and producer.

 

Among his other films: "One from the Heart" (1982), "The Outsiders" (1983), "Rumble Fish" (1983), "The Cotton Club" (1984), "Peggy Sue Got Married" (1986), "Gardens of Stone" (1987), "Tucker: The Man and His Dream" (1988), "Bram Stoker's Dracula" (1992), "Jack" (1996) and "The Rainmaker" (1997).

 

On November 13, 2010, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Science presented Coppola the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award, which goes to a producer for his body of work.

 

In the 1970s, Coppola became interested in real estate in northern California. He purchased a winery that sells several brands of wine. He has several other business interests, including cigars, a line of prepared foods, restaurants, and Central American resorts. He financed his 2007 film "Youth Without Youth" with profits from his private company. "I’m no longer dependent on the movie business to make a living," Coppola told Vanity Fair magazine's Bruce Handy in 2007. "So if I want to make movies as other old guys would play golf, I can."

 

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...actress Robin Wright (born April 8, 1966), who in the 1980s went from soap princess on TV's "Santa Barbara" to "The Princess Bride." She's now a formidable presence as First Lady Claire Underwood in the Netflix drama series "House of Cards," and earned a 2014 Golden Globe for her efforts. She has been nominated for Primetime Emmys in the category of Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series for four consecutive years.

 

She also became a feminist heroine last year because she demanded -- and got -- a salary equal to that of her "House of Cards" co-star and co-executive producer Kevin Spacey. At the time, Spacey reportedly made $500,000 per episode to Wright's $420,000.

 

In 1989, Wright became involved with actor Sean Penn. They married in 1996, and the actress began using the name Robin Wright Penn professionally. They had two children, a daughter named Dylan (now a model and aspiring actress) and a son named Hopper Jack. During their relationship, Wright reared the children while Penn acted in film projects. But she always took the time for at least one picture per year. "I work on the average of once a year just because the material is not there," she once said. "Now, if I didn't have the responsibility of kids and it was just me and my dog, I would probably work more and do those projects that are mediocre. Now I just do what I consider to be quality. It allows you to be more selective."

 

Among her other film credits: "Forrest Gump" (as the grown-up Jenny Curran in the 1994 Best Picture winner); "The Crossing Guard" (1996, written and directed by Penn and starring Jack Nicholson); "She's So Lovely" (1997, written by John Cassavetes and directed by his son Nick); "Message in a Bottle" (1999, with Kevin Costner and Paul Newman); "White Oleander" (2002); "State of Play" (2009); "Moneyball" (2011); and David Fincher's 2011 version of "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo."

 

Wright will appear in two high-profile films that will be released later in 2017 -- "Wonder Woman" (as the title character's Amazonian aunt) and "Blade Runner 2049."

 


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...actress Robin Wright (born April 8, 1966), who in the 1980s went from soap princess on TV's "Santa Barbara" to "The Princess Bride." She's now a formidable presence as First Lady Claire Underwood in the Netflix drama series "House of Cards," and earned a 2014 Golden Globe for her efforts. She has been nominated for Primetime Emmys in the category of Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series for four consecutive years.

I've always liked her. She has a girl-next-door quality and her acting is very natural.

 

Also, Happy Birthday to Patricia Arquette today- 49

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...the French actor Jean-Paul Belmondo (born April 9, 1933), who became an international star opposite Jean Seberg in Jean-Luc Godard's New Wave drama "Breathless" (1960). The groundbreaking film, about a Parisian car thief who kills a policeman and tries to elude capture with his American girl friend, was co-written by François Truffaut.

 


The late Chicago Sun-Times film critic Roger Ebert declared that modern movies began with "Breathless." He also linked Belmondo's character with noteworthy ones that came later.

 

"There is a direct line through 'Breathless' to 'Bonnie and Clyde,' 'Badlands' and the youth upheaval of the late 1960s," Ebert wrote in 2003. "The movie was a crucial influence during Hollywood's 1967-1974 golden age. You cannot even begin to count the characters played by Pacino, Beatty, Nicholson, Penn, who are directly descended from Jean-Paul Belmondo's insouciant killer Michel."

 

Among Belmondo's other films: Vittorio de Sica's "Two Women" (1960, the Italian production for which Sophia Loren won an Academy Award); Philippe de Broca's adventure/comedy "That Man from Rio" (1964, with Françoise Dorleac); René Clément's World War II drama "Is Paris Burning?" (1966, featuring an international all-star cast); Truffaut's "Mississippi Mermaid" (1969, with Catherine Deneuve); and "Borsalino" (1970, a gangster film co-starring Alain Delon).

 

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...Sweden's Max von Sydow (born April 10, 1929), who collaborated with filmmaker Ingmar Bergman on numerous classic pictures from the mid-1950s to the early 1970s. The films included: "The Seventh Seal" (1957), "Wild Strawberries" (1957), "The Magician" (1958), "The Virgin Spring" (1960), "Though a Glass Darkly" (1961), "Winter Light" (1963), "Hour of the Wolf" (1968) and "The Passion of Anna" (1969).

 

"The Seventh Seal" features one of moviedom's iconic scenes: Von Sydow as a 14th-century knight who plays a high-stakes game of chess with the personification of Death (Bengt Ekerot).

 


 

In a 2015 magazine piece in "The Atlantic," writer Terrence Rafferty praised Von Sydow as "the greatest actor alive." He certainly has been versatile. He portrayed Christ in George Stevens' 1965 New Testament tale "The Greatest Story Ever Told." Three decades later, he played the Devil in a 1993 screen adaptation of Stephen King's 1991 novel "Needful Things."  

 

Von Sydow has been nominated twice for Academy Awards. He received a 1988 Best Actor nomination for his performance as the title character in Bille August's Danish-Swedish drama "Pelle the Conqueror." Almost 25 years later, he received a Best Supporting Actor nod for his role as a mute grandfather in Stephen Daldry's 2012 film "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close."

 

He earned a 2016 Primetime Emmy nomination as Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series for his appearances as the Three-Eyed Raven in the HBO series "Game of Thrones."

 

Among his other non-Bergman films: Jan Troell's "The Emigrants" (1971) and "The New Land" (1972); "The Exorcist" (1973, as Father Merrin); "Three Days of the Condor" (1975); "Voyage of the Damned" (1976); "Flash Gordon" (1980, as Ming the Merciless); "Victory" (1981, featuring Sylvester Stallone and Sir Michael Caine as soccer-playing Allied POWs); "Never Say Never Again" (1983, as James Bond's nemesis Ernst Stavro Blofeld); Woody Allen's "Hannah and Her Sisters" (1986); Steven Spielberg's "Minority Report" (2002); and "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" (2015).


 

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...actor Joel Grey (born Joel David Katz on April 11, 1932), who followed his triumphant 1967 Tony Award-winning performance in the Broadway musical "Cabaret" with a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for the 1972 film adaptation.

 

Grey starred as the decadent Master of Ceremonies in both versions of the musical, set in the Berlin of the 1920s before the Nazis' complete takeover of Germany.

 


 


Grey is one of 10 actors to receive a Tony and an Oscar for the same role on stage and screen. The others are:


  • José Ferrer for "Cyrano de Bergerac" (a 1947 Tony and a 1950 Oscar).
  • Shirley Booth for "Come Back Little Sheba" (a 1950 Tony and a 1952 Oscar).
  • Yul Brynner for "The King and I" (a 1952 Tony and a 1956 Oscar). 
  • Anne Bancroft for "The Miracle Worker" (a 1960 Tony and a 1962 Oscar).
  • Sir Rex Harrison for "My Fair Lady" (a 1957 Tony and a 1964 Oscar).
  • Paul Scofield for "A Man for All Seasons" (a 1962 Tony and a 1966 Oscar).
  • Jack Albertson for "The Subject was Roses" (a 1965 Tony and a 1968 Oscar).
  • Lila Kedrova for "Zorba the Greek" and "Zorba" (a 1964 Oscar and a 1984 Tony).
  • Viola Davis for "Fences" (a 2010 Tony and a 2016 Oscar).


Show business runs deep in Grey's family. His father was Mickey Katz (1909-1985), the Cleveland-born entertainer, clarinetist and bandleader who performed Yiddish parodies of popular songs. His daughter is actress Jennifer Grey, who starred in the 1980s hit movies "Dirty Dancing" and "Ferris Bueller's Day Off." His son-in-law -- Jennifer's husband -- is actor Clark Gregg, who stars as director Phil Coulson in the ABC series "Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D."

 

In 2016, Grey revealed in his autobiography -- titled "Master of Ceremonies: A Memoir" -- that he had been a closet homosexual for many years.

 

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...the American-born Irish actress Saorise -- pronounced "Sersha" -- Ronan (born April 12, 1994), one of the rare performers to earn Academy Award nominations before and after the age of 21. When she was 13 years and 285 days old, Ronan received a Best Supporting Actress nomination for her performance as a precocious troublemaker in the 2007 drama "Atonement." Eight years later, Ronan was nominated for Best Actress of 2015 for her starring role as a 1950s Irish immigrant in "Brooklyn." Ronan received the nomination on January 14, 2016, when she was 21 years and 277 days old.


 

Others who received Oscar nominations before and after the age of 21:


  • Mickey Rooney, "Babes in Arms" (Best Actor, 1939 at 19 years, 142 days); three other nominations after age 21.
  • Dame Angela Lansbury, "Gaslight" (Best Supporting Actress, 1944 at 19); "The Picture of Dorian Gray" (Best Supporting Actress, 1945 at 20); one other nomination after age 21.
  • Sal Mineo, "Rebel Without a Cause" (Best Supporting Actor, 1955 at 17 years, 39 days); one other nomination after age 21.
  • Isabelle Adjani, "The Story of Adele H." (Best Actress, 1975 at 20 years, 235 days); one other nomination after age 21.
  • Jodie Foster,  "Taxi Driver" (Best Supporting Actress, 1976 at 14 years, 83 days); three other nominations after age 21.
  • Leonardo DiCaprio, "What's Eating Gilbert Grape" (Best Supporting Actor, 1993 at 19 years, 90 days); four other nominations after age 21.
  • Keira Knightley, "Pride and Prejudice" (Best Actress, 2005 at 20 years, 311 days); one other nomination after age 21.
  • Jennifer Lawrence, "Winter's Bone" (Best Actress, 2010 at 20 years, 163 days); three other nominations after age 21.

Ronan, whose father Paul is an actor, was born in New York City. Her family moved to Ireland when she was three. The actress, who has dual American and Irish citizenship, now resides in Manhattan. 

 

Among her other film credits: "I Could Never Be Your Woman" (2007), "City of Ember" (2008), "The Lovely Bones" (2009), "Hanna" (2011) and "The Grand Budapest Hotel" (2014).

 

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...the actor, choreographer, director and producer Stanley Donen (born April 13, 1924), whose collaborations with Gene Kelly produced some of the movies' greatest musicals. Among their efforts as co-directors: "On the Town" (1949), "Singin' in the Rain" (1952) and "It's Always Fair Weather" (1955). On his own, Donen directed "Royal Wedding" (1951), "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" (1954) and "Funny Face" (1957).
 
In the late 1950s and 1960s, Donen produced and directed several popular non-musicals, including "Indiscreet" (1958, a romantic comedy starring Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman); "Charade" (1963, a thriller starring Grant and Audrey Hepburn); "Arabesque" (1966. another thriller, this time teaming Gregory Peck and Sophia Loren); "Two for the Road" (1967, a romantic comedy starring Hepburn and Albert Finney); and "Bedazzled" (1967, a version of "Faust" starring the British comedy team of Peter Cook and Dudley Moore).
 
His last big-screen effort was the 1984 romantic comedy "Blame It on Rio," which starred Sir Michael Caine, Joseph Bologna, Demi Moore and Michelle Johnson.

On March 23, 1998, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences presented Donen with an honorary Oscar "in appreciation of a body of work marked by grace, elegance, wit and visual innovation." The veteran hoofer responded with a crowd-pleasing acceptance speech.
 
 
Since 1999, Donen has been linked to the versatile filmmaker, writer, actress and comedian Elaine May.
 
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...the actor, choreographer, director and producer Stanley Donen (born April 13, 1924)

Great talent-and underrated by many, I think.

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So, what bout Oscar winning composer BILL CONTI (74)

 

Actor PAUL SORVINO (77)

 

And my favorite "soul" singer AL GREEN (71)?

 

 

And of course, THOMAS JEFFERSON?

 

 

Sepiatone

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...the Academy Award-winning actress Julie Christie (born April 14, 1940), who became a movie superstar -- and fashion icon --during the 1960s and 1970s. She also became known for her political activism -- and her romances with co-stars Terence Stamp and Warren Beatty.

 

The British actress has been nominated four times for Academy Awards (Oscar win in bold): 


  • Diana Scott in "Darling" (1965). Best Actress.
  • Constance Miller in "McCabe & Mrs. Miller" (1971). Best Actress.
  • Phyllis Mann in "Afterglow" (1997). Best Actress.
  • Fiona Anderson in "Away from Her" (2006). Best Actress.
Among her other film credits: "Doctor Zhivago" (1965, as Larissa "Lara" Antipova); "Fahrenheit 451" (1966, a dual role in François Truffaut's only English-language film); "Far from the Madding Crowd" (1967, as Thomas Hardy's heroine Bathsheba Everdene); "Petulia" (1968, with George C. Scott); "The Go-Between" (1971, a period piece directed by Joseph Losey); "Don't Look Now" (1973, a thriller directed by Nicolas Roeg); and "Shampoo" (1975, her second of three films with Beatty).

 

Imagine the films that Christie might have done, but turned down: "Bonnie and Clyde" (1967), "They Shoot Horses, Don't They?" (1969), "Anne of the Thousand Days" (1969), "Nicholas and Alexandra" (1971) and "Reds" (1981). All of the pictures produced Oscar nominations for the actresses who eventually starred in them.

 

Christie's last picture with Beatty was the box-office and critical hit "Heaven Can Wait" (1978), a remake of the 1941 film "Here Comes Mr. Jordan." Although their real-life love affair had been over for some time when the movie was filmed, their characters set off serious romantic sparks just by making eye contact.

 


 

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