jakeem

Happy Birthday to...

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...France's Anouk Aimée (born Nicole Françoise Florence Dreyfus in Paris on April 27, 1932), whose credits include "Un homme et une femme" (or "A Man and a Woman") for which she received a 1966 Academy Award nomination as Best Actress.

 

The daughter of actress Geneviève Sorya, young Nicole studied dance and theater. She made her screen debut at the age of 14 in "La maison sous la mer" (or "Home under the Sea"), a 1947 drama by director Henri Calef. In the film, the budding actress played a character named Anouk. The name stuck when everyone began calling her that.

 

She later received her professional surname Aimée from the French poet and writer Jacques Prévert, who wrote the screenplay for her second film, "The Lovers of Verona" (1949).

 

 

"It just means 'love,' " she explained to Chicago Sun-Times film critic Roger Ebert in 1986. "Prévert told me I needed a second name. When you're 40, he said, you'll feel silly with only one name."

In the 1960s, Aimée starred in two films directed by the great Italian director Federico Fellini. In "La Dolce Vita" (or "The Sweet Life"), she played a glamorous society woman named Maddalena who spends a memorable evening with Italian journalist Marcello Rubini (Marcello Mastroianni).
 
 
 
The actress reunited with Fellini and Mastrioianni for "8 1/2" (1963), which won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. She played Luisa Anselmi, estranged wife of the philandering film director played by Mastroianni.
 
Aimée played the title character in "Lola" (1961, pictured below) -- the debut effort for writer-director Jacques Demy, who later filmed "Les Parapluies de Cherbourg" (or "The Umbrellas of Cherbourg") -- released in 1964 -- and "Les Demoiselles de Rochefort" (or "The Young Girls of Rochefort") -- which opened in 1967. She appeared as Lola, a French cabaret performer, a second time in Demy's first American-made feature, "Model Shop" (1969).
 
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Aimée co-starred with Jean-Louis Trintignant in director Claude Lelouch's "Un homme et une femme," the story of a widow and a widower who fall in love. The romantic drama -- featuring catchy thematic music by Francis Lai -- won the Palme d'Or ("Golden Palm"), the top prize at the 1966 Cannes Film Festival.
The film also won the 1966 Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film and an Oscar for Best Original Screenplay (shared by Lelouch and Pierre Uytterhoeven). In addition to Aimée's Best Actress nomination -- she lost to Elizabeth Taylor of "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf" -- Lelouch was recognized in the Best Director category.
 
 
Two decades later, Aimée, Trintignant and Lelouch reteamed for a sequel, titled "Un homme et une femme, 20 ans déjà" (or "A Man and a Woman...20 Years After"). 
 
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...the versatile singer-dancer-actress Ann-Margret (born Ann-Margret Olsson in Sweden on April 28, 1941), who went from screen sex kitten in the 1960s to status as a two-time Academy Award nominee in the 1970s.

Her first major picture was director Frank Capra's last. "Pocketful of Miracles" (1961) was a remake of Capra's 1933 comedy/drama "Lady for a Day." In the film, Glenn Ford plays a a bootlegger who helps a New York City street peddler named Apple Annie (Bette Davis) save face when her daughter (Ann-Margret) -- who has been abroad for years -- comes to town.  

Two years later, Ann-Margret starred in the screen version of the Broadway musical "Bye Bye Birdie." Directed by George Sidney ("Anchors Aweigh," "The Harvey Girls"), the film featured the starlet as a teen Ohio schoolgirl selected to give drafted rock 'n' roll idol Conrad Birdie (Jesse Pearson) a live goodbye kiss on "The Ed Sullivan Show." Although it was only Ann-Margret's third film, her performance made her a star -- and launched her career as a screen sex symbol. 
 
Her charisma in "Birdie" was the subject of a Season 3 episode of TV's "Mad Men.
 
 
 
Sidney directed Ann-Margret again in the 1964 Elvis Presley musical "Viva Las Vegas" (pictured below), in which the two stars sizzled onscreen (and off). In her 1994 autobiography "Ann-Margret: My Story," the actress referred to Elvis as her "soulmate." They wound up with other people, however. Elvis married Priscilla Beaulieu on May 1, 1967. Seven days later, Ann-Margret was wed to the actor Roger Smith (of TV's "77 Sunset Strip"), who became her manager.
 
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Ann-Margret became appreciated as a serious actress in Mike Nichols' 1971 comedy/drama "Carnal Knowledge" (pictured below) -- written by Jules Feiffer -- in which she co-starred with Jack Nicholson, Art Garfunkel and Candice Bergen. She played Bobbie, who becomes suicidal when her relationship with Jonathan Fuerst (Nicholson) deteriorates over time. For her performance, Ann-Margret received an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress.
 
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After recovering from a horrific 1972 accident in which she fell 22-feet from a stage in Lake Tahoe, Nevada, Ann-Margret received her second Oscar nomination -- this time for Best Actress. In Ken Russell's 1975 production of The Who's groundbreaking 1969 rock opera "Tommy," she appeared as the mother of the title character (played by Roger Daltrey, the rock group's lead singer) -- a "deaf, dumb and blind kid" who became a renowned pinball player and something of a cult figure.  

 
In 2010, Ann-Margret won a Primetime Emmy Award for a guest appearance in an episode of NBC's "Law & Order: SVU." She had been nominated for Emmys six other times.
 
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Her latest film is the bank heist comedy "Going in Style," in which she co-stars with Morgan Freeman, Sir Michael Caine and Alan Arkin.
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I love the scene from Bye Bye Birdie when Ann-Margaret, trying to convine her parents she is grown up and their equal, comes downstairs in a sweatshirt and fuzzy slippers. Then, when she receives the telephone call that she was chosen to be on TV with Conrad Birdie, she gradually becomes hysterical, calling to her mom "Doris? Mother? Mom? Mommy?"

I always love that scene!

 

Also, Happy Birthday to the lovely Penelope Cruz- 43

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I don't think there's a red-blooded American male "Baby Boomer" alive who never at least once had a "thing" for Ann-Margaret. (You don't think we flocked to the theaters to see CARNAL KNOWLEDGE  because of Nicholson or Candice Bergen, do ya?).

 

Great singer, excellent dancer and talented actress, all while being easy on the eyes and a person of admirable character, I can't but wish her the happiest of birthdays.

 

 

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...Sir Daniel Day-Lewis (born April 29,1957), the Irish-British star known for going to great lengths to create indelible characters. He is the only person to win three Academy Awards for Best Actor.

 

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It's possible that he was born to pursue artistic challenges. His maternal grandfather was Sir Michael Balcon (1896-1977), the producer who ran Britain's Ealing Studios from the late 1930s to the 1950s. His mother was the stage, film, radio and television actress Jill Balcon (1925-2009). His father was the Irish poet Cecil Day-Lewis (1904-1972), who served as the United Kingdom's poet laureate from 1968 until his death.

 

 The younger Day-Lewis, who was knighted for services to drama in 2014, has been nominated for Academy Awards five times. His nominated roles and films are as follows (Oscar wins in bold):



  • Christy Brown in "My Left Foot" (1989). Best Actor.
  • Gerry Conlon in "In the Name of the Father" (1993). Best Actor.
  • Bill "The Butcher" Cutting in "Gangs of New York" (2003). Best Actor.
  • Daniel Plainview in "There Will Be Blood" (2007). Best Actor.
  • President Abraham Lincoln in "Lincoln" (2012). Best Actor.


Only five other people have won at least three Academy Awards for acting. The others: 



  • Katharine Hepburn (4) -- won Best Actress awards for "Morning Glory" (1932/1933); "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" (1967); "The Lion in Winter" (1968, a tie with Barbra Streisand of "Funny Girl"); and "On Golden Pond" (1981).
  • Jack Nicholson (3) -- won Best Actor awards for "One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest" (1975) and "As Good As It Gets" (1997); won a Best Supporting Actor award for "Terms of Endearment" (1983).
  • Walter Brennan (3) -- won Best Supporting Actor awards for "Come and Get It" (1936); "Kentucky" (1938); and "The Westerner" (1940).
  • Ingrid Bergman (3) -- won Best Actress awards for "Gaslight" (1944) and "Anastasia" (1956); won a Best Supporting Actress award for "Murder on the Orient Express" (1974).
  • Meryl Streep (3) -- won Best Actress awards for "Sophie's Choice" (1982) and "The Iron Lady" (2011); won a Best Supporting Actress award for "Kramer vs. Kramer" (1979).


Day-Lewis's willingness to go all out for a film character is near legendary. To play the real-life disabled writer and painter in "My Left Foot," the actor spent two months in a cerebral palsy clinic in Dublin. He learned to speak as Brown did and use his left foot to write and paint. He also stayed in character -- and in a wheelchair. As a result, he had to be lifted around the set and spoon fed by others.

 


 

Day-Lewis, who became the first person to win an Oscar for playing a real or fictional POTUS, took his "Lincoln" role seriously, too. He reportedly read more than 100 books about the 16th president and studied photographs of the American icon. Again, the actor stayed in character during the filming of the movie. Actress Sally Field, who played First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln in the biopic, revealed that Day-Lewis sent her text messages as Lincoln.

 


 

Since 1996, Day-Lewis has been married to the writer and filmmaker Rebecca Miller, daughter of the great American playwright Arthur Miller (1915-2005). They have two sons. Day-Lewis also has a son from his previous relationship with the French actress Isabelle Adjani.

 


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Day-Lewis accepted his record third Academy Award as Best Actor for "Lincoln"

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How I love Daniel Day-Lewis- great actor! I have to wonder, however, if a Method Actor's going to extreme lengths strategy for preparing for a role is really necessary. Who am I to question 3 Oscars, though? ;)

 

Also, Happy Birthday to screen beauties Uma Therman- 47  and Michelle Pfeiffer- 59

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...Iowa-born Cloris Leachman (born April 30, 1926), the onetime beauty queen -- she represented Chicago in the 1946 Miss America Pageant -- who became one of the most honored actresses in motion pictures and television. She won the 1971 Academy Award as Best Supporting Actress for her performance in "The Last Picture Show." She also holds the acting record for most Primetime Emmy wins with eight (pictured below) -- and she owns a Daytime Emmy. 

 

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PRIMETIME EMMYS 


  • 1973 -- Outstanding Single Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role -- "A Brand New Life" (TV movie)
  • 1974 -- Outstanding Supporting Actress in Comedy Series -- "Mary Tyler Moore"
  • 1975 -- .Outstanding Continuing or Single Performance by a Supporting Actress in Variety or Music -- "Cher" (TV variety show)
  • 1975 --  Outstanding Single Performance by a Supporting Actress in a Comedy or Drama Series -- "Mary Tyler Moore" 
  • 1984 -- Outstanding Individual Performance in a Variety or Music Program -- "Screen Actors Guild 50th Anniversary Celebration" (TV special)
  • 1998 -- Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series -- "Promised Land" 
  • 2002 --  Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series -- "Malcolm in the Middle"
  • 2006 -- Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series -- "Malcolm in the Middle" 

 

DAYTIME EMMY



  • 1984 -- Outstanding Performer in Children's Programming -- "The Woman Who Willed a Miracle" (TV special)


 

In the 1950s and 1960s, Leachman appeared in episodes of numerous television shows. She even became a regular on series that starred Bob and Ray (in 1952) and Lassie (in 1957 and 1958). On Christmas Eve in 1962, she guest-starred in three different prime-time TV series -- "Saints and Sinners" (on NBC), "Stoney Burke" (on ABC) and "The New Loretta Young Show" (on CBS). 

 

One of her first significant movie roles was in "Mickey Spillane's 'Kiss Me Deadly'." (1955), the Mike Hammer film in which she appeared as an ill-fated blonde clad only in a trenchcoat on a highway.

 

Sixteen years later, Leachman earned raves for her performance as a neglected Texas town housewife in Peter Bogdanovich's "The Last Picture Show." She earned a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her efforts (pictured below).

 

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Leachman played the supercilious Minneapolis landlady Phyllis Lindstrom on the award-winning CBS sitcom "Mary Tyler Moore" from 1970 to 1975. In the fall of 1975, the character was given her own series -- titled "Phyllis" -- and dispatched to San Francisco. The show's opening credits sequence was a parody of the one in the series from which "Phyllis" was spun.

 


 

Leachman became a member of Mel Brooks' screen repertory company. She memorably appeared in his horror spoof "Young Frankenstein" (1974) as Frau Blücher, a severe woman whose name had an interesting effect on horses.

 


 

Leachman also appeared in Brooks' "High Anxiety" (1977), a parody of Sir Alfred Hitchcock's suspense films. She played Nurse Diesel from the Psychoneurotic Institute for the Very, Very Nervous. The character likely was patterned after Mrs. Danvers. the character played by Dame Judith Anderson in Hitchcock's 1940 Best Picture winner, "Rebecca." 

 

Her last Brooks comedy was "History of the World, Part I," in which she played Madame Defarge in the segment about 18th-century France.

 

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How I love Daniel Day-Lewis- great actor! I have to wonder, however, if a Method Actor's going to extreme lengths strategy for preparing for a role is really necessary. Who am I to question 3 Oscars, though? ;)

 

Also, Happy Birthday to screen beauties Uma Therman- 47  and Michelle Pfeiffer- 59

 

I saw Daniel Day-Lewis play Hamlet at the National Theatre in London many years ago (Judi Dench as his mother). Day-Lewis took the role so seriously, he allegedly had a nervous breakdown and had to leave the production for a while.

 

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...the enduring French actress and singer Danielle Darrieux (born May 1, 1917), who observes her 100th birthday today. She began her film career in the early 1930s and appeared in movies into the 2010s. 

 

At an early age, she studied cello and piano at the Paris Conservatory. She made her screen debut at the age of 14 in the Austrian director Wilhelm Thiele's 1931 comedy/drama "Le bal" (or "The Ball").

 

She became an international star in Anatole Litvak's 1936 historical drama "Mayerling," based on the ill-fated romance of Austria's Crown Prince Rudolph (played in the movie by Charles Boyer) and Baroness Marie Vetsera. The film was remade in 1968 with a cast that included Omar Sharif, Catherine Deneuve, James Mason and Ava Gardner.

 

Darrieux made her first appearance in an American film when her first husband, director-writer Henri Decoin, signed with Universal Pictures. She co-starred with Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. in "The Rage of Paris" (1938), which was directed by Henry Koster.

 

During the Nazi occupation of France in World War II, Darrieux drew criticism for cooperating with the Germans. She even entertained troops in Germany. As a result, she was viewed as a collaborator by the French underground which imposed a death sentence on her. The sentence was rescinded, but it took several years for the actress to regain popularity in her native country.

 

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Darrieux appeared as the title character in Max Ophüls' French drama "Madame de…" (1953)

 

During the early 1950s, Darrieux enjoyed a productive professional relationship with the German-born director Max Ophüls. They collaborated on three landmark films: "La ronde" (1950, or "The Round"); "La plaisir" (1952, or "Pleasure"); and "Madame de..." (1953, released outside France as "The Earrings of Madame de...").  

 

She returned to the United States during the decade and made two films: "Rich, Young and Pretty" (1950) and "Five Fingers" (1952).

 

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Darrieux played the mother of talented twin girls in "Les Demoiselles de Rochefort" (1967)

 

In Jacques Demy's 1967 musical "Les Demoiselles de Rochefort" (or "The Young Girls of Rochefort"), Darrieux appeared as the mother of the title characters (played by the real-life siblings Deneuve and Françoise Dorléac). It was Dorléac's penultimate film (she was killed in an auto accident on June 26, 1967). Darrieux would play Deneuve's mother in several subsequent films.

 

Darrieux was presented an honorary César Award -- the French equivalent of an Oscar -- for the year 1985. She has been nominated for three Césars without a competitive win.

 

In 2002, Darrieux appeared in François Ozon's murder mystery/ musical "8 Femmes" (or "8 Women"), in which she co-starred with Deneuve and six other French actresses: Isabelle Huppert, Emmanuelle Béart, Fanny Ardant, Virginie Ledoyen, Ludivine Sagnier and Firmine Richard.

 


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...the British filmmaker Stephen Daldry (born May 2, 1961), whose first three features earned him Academy Award nominations for Best Director. Two of his first four films received Best Picture nominations.

 

Daldry's first four feature films were:

  • "Billy Elliot" (2000) -- The story of a 1980s working-class British youngster (Jamie Bell, in his screen debut) who discovers that he prefers ballet to boxing. The film received Oscar nominations for Best Director, Best Supporting Actress (Julie Walters) and Best Original Screenplay (Lee Hall). Daldry won a 2009 Tony for directing "Billy Elliot the Musical," which won nine other awards -- including Best Musical.
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  • "The Hours" (2002) -- The screen version of Michael Cunningham's 1999 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel earned Nicole Kidman a Best Actress Oscar for her portrayal of the British writer Virginia Woolf. The film received eight other Academy Award nominations: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Supporting Actor (Ed Harris), Best Supporting Actress (Julianne Moore), Best Adapted Screenplay (David Hare), Best Original Score (Philip Glass), Best Costume Design (Ann Roth) and Best Film Editing (Peter Boyle).
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  • "The Reader" (2008) -- Kate Winslet received a Best Actress Oscar for her performance in this drama about a woman forced to come to terms with her actions during World War II. The film also was nominated for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay (Hare) and Best Cinematography (Roger Deakins and Chris Menges).
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  • Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (2011) -- This drama with a 9/11 theme starred Tom Hanks, Sandra Bullock, Max von Sydow, John Goodman, Viola Davis, Jeffrey Wright, Zoe Caldwell and teen newcomer Thomas Horn. It received Oscar nominations for Best Picture and Best Supporting Actor (Von Sydow).
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Daldry is an executive producer of "The Crown," the award-winning Netflix series about the early years of Queen Elizabeth II's reign as monarch of the United Kingdom. He directed the first two episodes.
 
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His upcoming film projects include a screen adaptation of the long-running Broadway musical "Wicked" and a biopic about the teen Syrian refugee Yusra Mardini, who competed as a swimmer at the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

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...the enduring French actress and singer Danielle Darrieux (born May 1, 1917), who observes her 100th birthday today. 

I honestly had no idea Ms Darrieux was still alive. I enjoyed the block of films shown in her honor last night. She is a charming actress. Years ago I had read about her entertaining German troops during the Nazi occupation in France, and it soured me a little toward her likability. In the modern age, though, no one would blink an eye at that kind of thing.

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...the British-American actress Rebecca Hall (born May 3, 1982), who delivers the goods whether she's starring in a period piece, a contemporary tale or a Marvel movie. Born in London, she is the daughter of Sir Peter Hall, the prominent theater director who founded the Royal Shakespeare Company in the 1960s. Her mother is the celebrated American opera singer Maria Ewing. Her parents divorced when she was 5.

 

At the age of 10, Hall made her professional acting debut in her father's television production of "The Camomile Lawn," based on a 1984 novel by Mary Wesley.

 

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Rebecca and Sir Peter Hall 

 

According to a 2010 piece in The New York Times, Hall's father once asked her an important question: "Do you want to be a child actress or an actress?" Her response: "I want to be an actress." 

 

Her father then suggested that she make her formative years "as rich as you can and then be an actor when you grow up."

 

Hall attended Cambridge University, where she studied English literature for two years. She dropped out to pursue acting. Her stage debut was in a 2002 West End production of "Mrs. Warren’s Profession," directed by her father.

 

Her first film was the 2006 campus comedy/drama "Starter for 10," which featured a cast of other rising stars -- James McAvoy, Alice Eve, Dominic Cooper, James Corden and Benedict Cumberbatch. 

 


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James McAvoy and Hall played British university students in the dramedy "Starter for 10" (2006)

 

In 2008, Hall starred with Scarlett Johannson, Javier Bardem and Penélope Cruz in Woody Allen's "Vicky Cristina Barcelona," the story of two American women who become involved with a painter while on vacation in Spain. For her performance, Hall received a Golden Globe nomination as Best Actress in a Motion Picture -- Comedy or Musical. Cruz won the Globe for Best Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture -- and went on to win a Best Supporting Actress Oscar.


 



 

Hall also received acclaim and several critics' awards for her performance in the 2016 drama "Christine." The picture was based on the true story of Christine Chubbuck, a Florida television news anchor who killed herself on the air in 1974.

 


 

Because she is half American, Hall has dual citizenship. She became inspired by such classic actresses from the United States as Barbara Stanwyck, Bette Davis and Myrna Loy. "Those were the women I wanted to grow up to be." she said. "But I was born in the wrong place and at the wrong time."


 

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Hall's latest film "Permission" opened at the Tribeca Film Festival last month. The comedy/drama about a contemporary couple co-stars Dan Stevens ("Beauty and the Beast"), Jason Sudeikis and Hall's husband since 2015, Morgan Spector.

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I honestly had no idea Ms Darrieux was still alive. I enjoyed the block of films shown in her honor last night. She is a charming actress. Years ago I had read about her entertaining German troops during the Nazi occupation in France, and it soured me a little toward her likability.

 

 

 

In the modern age, though, no one would blink an eye at that kind of thing.

I don't know all the details concerning Mme. Darrieux's activities during World War II in occupied France. But to the best of my knowledge whatever it was that she did, she was not branded a traitor or a collaborationist by the French government.

 

But on another note-- I believe that I would not be the only person who would have difficulty with any Entertainer who collaborated with neo-nazis today. There are still people alive today who endured the Holocaust and there are still people alive today, like myself, who would never see it normal to have any kind of relations with neo-nazis or fascists.

 

So I take umbrage with your statement that "in the Modern Age, though no one would blink an eye" about collaborating with Nazis--AKA neo-nazis, fascists or

Ku Klux Klan.

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I honestly had no idea Ms Darrieux was still alive. I enjoyed the block of films shown in her honor last night. She is a charming actress. Years ago I had read about her entertaining German troops during the Nazi occupation in France, and it soured me a little toward her likability. In the modern age, though, no one would blink an eye at that kind of thing.

 

I'm not familiarwith this actress, but I'd say that her entertaining German soldiers in that time and circumstance was probably a matter of survival ("Entertain us or be SHOT!"). 

 

I think(maybe) PRINCESS that Sagebrush meant that "nobody would blink an eye"  at what Ms. Darrieux did THEN.  And I'd agree.  I don't even know who she WAS, and it bothers me not.  ;)

 

But yeah, anyone in films today who knows and keeps up a friendship with Neo-Nazis, Skinheads, Klansmen and the like  WOULD be frowned upon, and probably find it hard if not impossible to find WORK in the biz.

 

 

Sepiatone

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...the veteran actor Richard Jenkins (born May 4, 1947), who probably is best known for playing the dead patriarch in the HBO series "Six Feet Under." Jenkins earned an Academy Award nomination as Best Actor for his performance in the 2007 drama "The Visitor." 

 
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Although his "Six Feet Under" character Nathaniel Fisher (pictured above) was killed in the first episode, Jenkins managed to appear in 21 of the series' 63 episodes from 2001 to 2005. The elder Fisher usually appeared in flashbacks or dream sequences.
 
In "The Visitor," Jenkins starred as a lonely college professor whose life is changed for the better after he befriends an illegal immigrant from Syria. 
 
The role was written for Jenkins by the actor turned filmmaker Tom McCarthy, who later won a 2015 Best Adapted Screenplay Oscar for the drama "Spotlight." McCarthy also directed that film, which won the Best Picture Oscar.
 
 
In a 2007 interview with USA Today, Jenkins admitted that it took time for him  to adjust to his new status as a leading man.
 
"I would say 'I'll go back to my trailer now,' and they'd say, 'No, no, you're in the next scene,' " he recalled. "It's one of those things that I didn't know if I would ever get an opportunity to try. I've been waiting my entire professional life for this experience."
 
"The Visitor" was written for Jenkins by the actor turned filmmaker Tom McCarthy, who later won a 2015 Best Adapted Screenplay Oscar for the drama "Spotlight." McCarthy also directed that film, which won the Best Picture Oscar.
 
Jenkins has been a ubiquitous presence in feature films over the years. Among his credits: "The Man Who Wasn’t There" (2001), "There's Something about Mary" (2001), "North Country" (2005), "Step Brothers" (2006), "The Cabin in the Woods" (2001), "Burn Before Reading" (2008), "Let Me In" (2010) and "Jack Reacher" (2012).
 
In 2015, Jenkins won a Primetime Emmy Award for his performance in the HBO miniseries "Olive Kitteridge." He was honored in the category of Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie for his work as the title character's husband Henry Kitteridge. The miniseries won eight overall Emmys, including Outstanding Limited Series and Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or a Movie (Frances McDormand).
 
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He will appear in Rob Reiner's upcoming biopic about Lyndon Baines Johnson. In the political drama, titled "LBJ," Jenkins portrays Georgia Senator Richard Russell, a longtime friend and confidant of the 36th president (played by Texan Woody Harrelson).
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...actor Lance Henriksen (born May 5, 1940), whose earliest film appearances included "The Godfather Part II" (1974), "Dog Day Afternoon" (1975), "Network" (1976) and "Close Encounters of the Third Kind" (1978). He rose to prominence as Mercury 7 Astronaut Walter "Wally" Schirra, Jr. in "The Right Stuff" (pictured below), Philip Kaufman's 1983 film version of the 1979 Tom Wolfe book about America's space program.
 
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The other Mercury 7 astronauts were portrayed by Scott Glenn (as Alan Shepard), Fred Ward (as Gus Grissom), Ed Harris (as John Glenn), Charles Frank (as M. Scott Carpenter), Dennis Quaid (as Gordon Cooper) and Scott Paulin (as Deke Slayton).
 
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Schirra, who died in 2007 at the age of 84, was the only Mercury astronaut to go up in space in the two-man Gemini and three-man Apollo projects that followed.
 
 
Henriksen told The Huffington Post in 2015 that he was unhappy with how the film -- nominated for eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture -- turned out. "Phil Kaufman did it as a satire, and I thought the Mercury astronauts were heroes, not 'spam in a can,' " Henriksen said. "I was very outspoken about it when the film came out, and I don’t think Phil ever forgave me. Gordo Cooper and I became very good friends afterward, and he was my adviser on a screenplay I wrote about space travel. I hope I can get it made some day."
 
 
 
The actor, who had played a police detective in James Cameron's 1984 breakthrough film "The Terminator," reunited with the director two years later for "Aliens." In the sci-fi sequel to Sir Ridley Scott's 1979 thriller "Alien," Hendriksen appeared as the android Bishop (pictured below). 
 
 
 
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From 1996 to 1999, Henriksen starred in the FOX dramatic series "Millennium," which was created by Chris Carter, the man behind "The X-Files." In the weekly drama, the actor played former FBI profiler Frank Black, who was blessed -- or cursed -- with the ability to see through the eyes of criminals.
 
Henriksen received a 1996-1997 Golden Globe nomination for Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series. But "Millennium" never rivaled the ratings success of "The X-Files." 
 
 
Henriksen has made occasional appearances in the AMC martial arts television series "Into the Badlands," in which he appears as the head of a pacifist religious group. His character also is the father of Lydia (played by Irish actress Orla Brady), the first wife of a once-powerful baron. 
 
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The actor, who had played a police detective in James Cameron's 1984 breakthrough film "The Terminator," reunited with the director two years later for "Aliens." In the sci-fi sequel to Sir Ridley Scott's 1979 thriller "Alien," Henriksen appeared as the android Bishop. 
 

 

Lance Henriksen was originally going to play the Terminator. Cameron wrote the script with him in mind, envisioning the killer cyborg as having a form that allowed him to blend in rather than stick out like Schwarzenegger would. Cameron and Henriksen had previously worked together on Cameron's directorial debut, Piranha II: The Spawning (1981). 

 

The producers behind The Terminator insisted on a bigger name as the title character, and actually pushed OJ Simpson for the role. Eventually all parties settled on Schwarzenegger, and Henriksen was given the supporting role as a police detective.

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...actor George Clooney (born May 6, 1961), who attained television stardom on "e.r." during the 1990s -- and then traded it for mega-success as an A-list screen star and filmmaker. 

 

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Cover credit: Sam Jones

 


The Kentucky-born Clooney -- whose aunt was the singer-actress Rosemary Clooney -- left the NBC hit "e.r." in 1999 after five seasons and almost 100 episodes. During the next decade, he would become a major motion picture star.

 

He has been nominated for eight Academy Awards in six different categories (Oscar wins in bold): 




  • 2005 -- Best Supporting Actor (for "Syriana").
  • 2005 -- Best Director (for "Good Night, and Good Luck).
  • 2005 -- Best Original Screenplay (shared with Grant Heslov for "Good Night, and Good Luck").
  • 2007 -- Best Actor (for "Michael Clayton").
  • 2009 -- Best Actor (for "Up in the Air").
  • 2011 -- Best Adapted Screenplay (shared with Heslov and Beau Willimon for "The Ides of March"). 
  • 2011 -- Best Actor (for "The Descendants").
  • 2012 -- Best Picture (shared with co-producers Heslov and Ben Affleck for "Argo").


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He also is one of only three people to have earned Oscar nominations for Best Actor, Best Supporting Actor and Best Director. The others who have done it: Sir Laurence Olivier and Sir Kenneth Branagh. No one has ever won awards in all three categories.

 

Clooney has starred in five films that have been nominated for Best Picture Academy Awards: "Good Night, and Good Luck" (2005), "Michael Clayton" (2007), "Up in the Air" (2009), "The Descendants" (2011) and "Gravity" (2013). 

 


 

 

From 1989 to 1993, Clooney was wed to actress Talia Balsam, the daughter of Oscar winner Martin Balsam and actress Joyce Van Patten. In 2014, the politically savvy star married Amal Alamuddin, an activist and human rights lawyer of British and Lebanese descent. The couple is expecting twins -- a boy and a girl -- in June 2017.

 

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Clooney's next film project is the crime comedy "Surburbicon," which he directed and also co-wrote with Heslov and Joel and Ethan Coen. The picture, which stars Matt Damon, Julianne Moore and Oscar Isaac, will be released on November 3, 2017.

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...filmmaker Amy Heckerling (born May 7, 1952), who  became one of the highest-grossing female directors in Hollywood history, thanks in part to her comedy hits "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" (1982), "Look Who's Talking" (1989) and "Clueless" (1994).

 

Her other films include: "Johnny Dangerously" (1984), "National Lampoon's European Vacation" (1985), "Loser" (2000), "I Could Never Be Your Woman" (2007, featuring an early film role for actress Saoirse Ronan) and "Vamps" (2012).

 

A native of the Bronx, Heckerling grew up with plans to become a writer for Mad magazine someday. But when she was 14, she changed her mind after discovering that a male classmate wanted to direct movies. "I just got insanely jealous," she once recalled. "I just thought, 'You said you can make movies. I love them more than you do. And besides, you cheat off me on your tests, so I’m smarter, so I should do it'."

 

Heckerling attended film school at New York University and was later accepted into a directing program run by the American Film Institute.

 

Her first feature film was "Fast Times at Ridgemont High," which was based on a book by Rolling Stone magazine's Cameron Crowe, who also would become a significant director. The film featured three future Oscar winners -- Sean Penn, Forest Whitaker and Nicolas Cage -- and several other budding stars, including Jennifer Jason Leigh, Phoebe Cates and Anthony Edwards.

 


 

The film earned $27 million at the box office and led to a short-lived TV version that was written, produced and directed by Heckerling.

 

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"Look Who's Talking" (pictured above), a romantic comedy starring John Travolta as a New York cab driver who becomes entangled in the domestic struggles of an unwed mother (Kirstie Alley), featured Bruce Willis as the baby's voice. Only the audience could hear its thoughts. The film was the nation's No. 1 motion picture for five consecutive weeks (October 15-November 18, 1989). It eventually grossed $140 million domestically and became the year's fourth biggest blockbuster -- trailing only "Batman," "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade" and "Lethal Weapon 2."

 

The comedy was followed by the sequels "Look Who's Talking Too" (1990) -- directed by Heckerling, who wrote it with her then-husband Neal Israel -- and "Look Who's Talking Now" (1993). The latter film was directed by Tom Ropelewski and co-written and co-produced by Heckerling. All three films starred Travolta, Alley and Olympia Dukakis.

 

Heckerling co-created a 1991 TV sitcom, "Baby Talk," which was inspired by "Look Who's Talking." The series, which starred Tony Danza and Mary Page Keller, ran for two seasons on ABC.

 


 

"Clueless," which starred the music video sensation Alicia Silverstone as a high school fashion maven, was a 1995 updating of the 1815 Jane Austen novel "Emma." The film grossed almost $60 million domestically and spawned a television series that aired for one season on ABC and two more on UPN (now The CW).

 

If you don't count the transgendered siblings Lana and Lilly Wachowski -- who have grossed $714.6 million with such films as "The Matrix" and its sequels -- then Heckerling is No. 7 on the all-time list of top-grossing women directors. Here are the Top 10 people on the list, according to boxofficemojo.com:

 

1. Nancy Meyers ("What Women Want," "Something's Gotta Give") -- $625.6 million.

2. Betty Thomas ("The Brady Bunch Movie," "Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel") -- $563.3 million.

3. Nora Ephron ("Sleepless in Seattle," "You've Got Mail") -- $515.0 million.

4. Vicky Jenson ("Shrek," "Shark Tale," "Post Grad") -- $434.9 million.

5. Penny Marshall ("Big," "A League of Their Own") -- $407.0 million.

6. Jennifer Lee ("Frozen") -- $400.7 million.

7. Heckerling -- $384.0 million.

8. Anne Fletcher ("Step Up," "The Proposal") -- $377.8 million.

9. Brenda Chapman ("Brave") -- $338.7 million.

10. Jennifer Yuh Nelson ("Kung Fu Panda 2") -- $308.8 million.

 


 


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Heckerling has directed four episodes of the Amazon Studios streaming series "Red Oaks," recently renewed for a third and final season. The comedy focuses on a country club in suburban New Jersey in 1985.

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... Heckerling is No. 6 on the all-time list of top-grossing women directors. Here are the Top 10 people on the list, according to boxofficemojo.com:
 
1. Nancy Meyers ("What Women Want," "Something's Gotta Give") -- $625.6 million.
2. Betty Thomas ("The Brady Bunch Movie," "Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel") -- $563.3 million.
3. Nora Ephron ("Sleepless in Seattle," "You've Got Mail") -- $515.0 million.
4. Penny Marshall ("Big," "A League of Their Own") -- $407.0 million.
5. Jennifer Lee ("Frozen") -- $400.7 million.
6. Heckerling -- $384.0 million.
7. Anne Fletcher ("Step Up," "The Proposal") -- $377.8 million.
8. Brenda Chapman ("Brave") -- $338.7 million.
9. Jennifer Yuh Nelson ("Kung Fu Panda 2") -- $308.8 million.
10. Catherine Hardwicke ("Twilight") -- $285.1 million.

It's interesting that Heckerling, Penny Marshall and Nora Ephron would be in the middle of the pack instead of the top of the list.

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...Britain's Jodhi May (born May 8, 1975), who in 1988 became the youngest person to win Best Actress honors at the Cannes Film Festival. She shared the award with her co-stars Barbara Hershey and Linda Mvusi for the anti-apartheid drama "A World Apart."

 

May had just turned 13 when the award was presented. The film marked her debut as an actress.

 

Set in Johannesburg, South Africa in 1963, the film -- directed by the Oscar-winning cinematographer Chris Menges ("The Killing Fields") -- is about an anti-apartheid activist (Hershey) as seen through the eyes of her 13-year-old daughter (May). Mvusi, a South African actress, co-starred as the family maid.

 


 

In Michael Mann's 1992 remake of "The Last of the Mohicans" -- starring Sir Daniel Day-Lewis -- May played Alice Munro, the doomed daughter of a British officer in the New York territory of the 18th-century. In the film, Alice and her sister Cora (Madeleine Stowe) are escorted through hostile environs by the title character Hawkeye, played by Day-Lewis.

 


 

May made a memorable appearance in the first Season 5 episode of the Primetime Emmy Award-winning television series "Game of Thrones." In a flashback sequence, she played a seer named Maggy the Frog -- who predicts the future of a young Cersei Lannister (played by Nell Williams). Among Maggy's prophecies: (1) Cersei will marry "the king" and be queen "for a time"; (2) there will emerge someone "younger, more beautiful to cast you down and take all you hold dear"; and (3) the king will sire 20 children, but Cersei will have three who will wear gold crowns -- and gold shrouds.

 

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May's latest film is "Let Me Go," based on the true story of the German-born author Helga Schneider -- whose estranged mother served as a Nazi guard at concentration camps during World War II. The drama, directed by Polly Steele (2008's "Lena: The Bride of Ice"), stars Juliet Stevenson as Schneider, May as her daughter Beth, and Lucy Boynton (of the 2017 version of "Murder on the Orient Express") as Beth's daughter. 

 

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...Britain's Jodhi May (born May 8, 1975), who in 1988 became the youngest person to win Best Actress honors at the Cannes Film Festival. She shared the award with her co-stars Barbara Hershey and Linda Mvusi for the anti-apartheid drama "A World Apart."
 
May made a memorable appearance in the first Season 5 episode of the Primetime Emmy Award-winning television series "Game of Thrones." In a flashback sequence, she played a seer named Maggy the Frog -- who predicts the future of a young Cersei Lannister (played by Nell Williams). Among Maggy's prophecies: (1) Cersei will marry "the king" and be queen "for a time"; (2) there will emerge someone "younger, more beautiful to cast you down and take all you hold dear"; and (3) the king will sire 20 children, but Cersei will have three who will wear gold crowns -- and gold shrouds.

 

I had no idea that was Jodhi May in that Game of Thrones scene. I liked her in The Last of the Mohicans, particularly that final section.

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It's interesting that Heckerling, Penny Marshall and Nora Ephron would be in the middle of the pack instead of the top of the list.

 

 

It is much more interesting that Lina Wertmuller, Dorothy Arzner or Ida Lupino would have no place on that list. Some of their work was commercial, but certainly not nearly as bad as some of the work that's listed in that top 10.

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...the five-time Academy Award nominee Albert Finney (born May 9. 1936), an accomplished dramatic actor who also made his mark in romantic comedies and musicals.
 
 His Oscar-nominated roles and films are as follows:
  • Tom Jones in "Tom Jones" (1963). Best Actor.
  • Hercule Poirot in "Murder on the Orient Express" (1974). Best Actor.
  • Sir in "The Dresser" (1983). Best Actor.
  • Geoffrey Firmin in "Under the Volcano" (1984). Best Actor.
  • Ed Masry in "Erin Brockovich" (2000). Best Supporting Actor.
 
His first appearances onscreen were in two noteworthy 1960 British films. In "The Entertainer," directed by Tony Richardson from the 1957 stage play by John Osborne, Finney was the ill-fated soldier son of the title character played by Sir Laurence Olivier. In "Saturday Night and Sunday Morning," a drama directed by the Czech-born filmmaker Karel Reisz, Finney starred as a disillusioned factory worker from Nottingham.
 
Three years later, the actor became a major star in Richardson's "Tom Jones," based on an 18th-century novel by Henry Fielding. The period comedy won four Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay (Osborne) and Best Substantially Original Score (John Addison).
 
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Finney and Susannah York in the 1963 Best Picture winner "Tom Jones"
 
In 1967, Finney starred with Audrey Hepburn in the romantic comedy "Two for the Road." Produced and directed by Stanley Donen, the film examined a failing marriage through European road trips the couple had taken through the years.
 
 
In 1970, Finney showed his musical prowess in "Scrooge," a musical version of Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" spearheaded by the Academy Award-winning songwriter Leslie Bricusse. The production was directed by Ronald Neame ("The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie," "The Poseidon Adventure"). A decade later, Finney took on the role of Daddy Warbucks in John Huston's 1982 film version of the Broadway musical "Annie."
 
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Finney (with Sir Alec Guinness as Marley's Ghost) starred in the 1970 musical "Scrooge"
 
The actor was almost unrecognizable in Sidney Lumet's 1974 adaptation of Agatha Christie's "Murder on the Orient Express." He played the Belgian sleuth Poirot while surrounded by an all-star cast that included Ingrid Bergman, Lauren Bacall, Sir Sean Connery, Vanessa Redgrave, Sir John Gielgud, Dame Wendy Hiller, Jacqueline Bisset, Anthony Perkins and Michael York. Sir Kenneth Branagh will star as Poirot in a new film version of the tale, scheduled to be released in November 2017.
 
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In "Erin Brockovich," Finney co-starred with Julia Roberts, who won an Oscar for her portrayal of the real-life activist who in the 1990s battled the utility company Pacific Gas & Electric over the poisoning of a small California town. Finney played attorney Masry, who teamed with Brockovich for the largest direct action lawsuit of its kind against PG&E. 
 
 
Finney's last screen appearance was opposite Daniel Craig and Dame Judi Dench in the 2012 James Bond thriller "Skyfall," in which he played Kincade, the gamekeeper of the onetime Bond family estate in Scotland. 

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