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Silver-Screens best Wyatt Earp???

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I bet right now that most will vote the same as I do Henry Fonda in Ford's superb 1946 "My Darling Clementine" (Fox)

 

Runner-Up Kevin Costner in 1994 long-(195min) but strong bio "Wyatt Earp" only made $25m. probably because "Tombstone" bit it to theaters by 6 months

 

as all now lots have played the legendary lawman who died in 1929 at 81 Ford even got to know him a bit towards the end

 

I like Kurt Russell ok in "Tombstone" (l993) ($57m.)

 

&it's strange Val Kilmer was pitch perfect as Doc Holliday in the latter-(deserved a s. actor nom)

& again Dennis Quaid was fine as Holliday in "Wyatt Earp', but Kilmer was so strong

 

 

Your comments please

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Harris Yulin is the best Wyatt Earp in 'Doc' (1971)

 

Val Kilmer is the best Doc Holliday ever.

 

But I really liked the version that was played by Christopher Dark in an episode of Bonanza where brash Little Joe nearly gets himself put into the ground when he runs afoul of Holliday.

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Fonda's Earp was very good.  So was BURT LANCASTER's.  And I'll add KURT RUSSELL

 

I didn't care much for JAMES GARNER's and KEVIN COSTNER's attempts.  and in MHO----

 

VAL KILMER's Doc Holliday was the BEST EVER!   Hands DOWN!

 

One of my favorite lines in TOMBSTONE comes from Kilmer's Holliday.....

 

"I have TWO guns....one for EACH of you..."   :D

 

Sepiatone

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Harris Yulin is the best Wyatt Earp in 'Doc' (1971)

 

Val Kilmer is the best Doc Holliday ever.

 

But I really liked the version that was played by Christopher Dark in an episode of Bonanza where brash Little Joe nearly gets himself put into the ground when he runs afoul of Holliday.

poor Quaid, it's like he never took on that role, due to Kilmer's earlier turn & he starved & such for the role I know Yulin, but don't recall him as Earp?

 

 

It seems off the top of my head that about as many portrayed Earp as Billy the Kid or Jesse James

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Ya know, when it comes to Holliday, I've always thought Victor Mature gave one of his best performances ever in that role along side Fonda's Earp.

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Garner in Hour Of The Gun, Yullin in Doc, and Russell in Tombstone

Quaid in Wyatt Earp and Kilmer in Tombstone

 

I'd like to see Walter Huston in Law and Order (1932) where it's loosely based on Earp. 

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Ya know, when it comes to Holliday, I've always thought Victor Mature gave one of his best performances ever in that role along side Fonda's Earp.

 

Despite the danger of my Mother's wrath from above, I have to say Mature's Doc wasn't all that good.  (SORRY, Ma.    Ma?  OhNO!  MA?  AIEEEEE!!!)

 

Sepiatone

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As a purely great Western I have to say John Ford's "My Darling Clementine". The film IMHO is poetry. A factual telling of the OK Corral.? No. Not even close. I know people who say if Ford knew the real Wyatt Earp so well how could he do a version so wrong. Well, Ford didn't write the novel or screenplay. It was an assignment given to him by Darryl F.Zanuck. Ford owed him one last picture.He [Zanuck ] re-edited Ford's version and added some additional footage he had director Lloyd Bacon shot. BUT, it is still Ford's film..Zanuck was a master editor and he kept Ford's  version [ with a few exceptions ] in tact.As far as the true story, I think "Tombstone" is the most honest version of events that took place on the streets of Tombstone in the early 1880's. Kurt Russell and Val Kilmer stand out in their roles. Outside of "Clementine" it's the version I've seen the most. "Gunfight at the O.K. Corral" another real good Western. Plays fast and loose with the facts. But Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas are at the top of their game and are fun to watch.. Kevin Costner's Wyatt Earp is good and Dennis Quaid's "Doc" Holiday is on the money, but the film tells me more than I ever wanted to know about Wyatt Earp.

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As a purely great Western I have to say John Ford's "My Darling Clementine". The film IMHO is poetry. A factual telling of the OK Corral.? No. Not even close. I know people who say if Ford knew the real Wyatt Earp so well how could he do a version so wrong. Well, Ford didn't write the novel or screenplay. It was an assignment given to him by Darryl F.Zanuck. Ford owed him one last picture.He [Zanuck ] re-edited Ford's version and added some additional footage he had director Lloyd Bacon shot. BUT, it is still Ford's film..Zanuck was a master editor and he kept Ford's  version [ with a few exceptions ] in tact.As far as the true story, I think "Tombstone" is the most honest version of events that took place on the streets of Tombstone in the early 1880's. Kurt Russell and Val Kilmer stand out in their roles. Outside of "Clementine" it's the version I've seen the most. "Gunfight at the O.K. Corral" another real good Western. Plays fast and loose with the facts. But Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas are at the top of their game and are fun to watch.. Kevin Costner's Wyatt Earp is good and Dennis Quaid's "Doc" Holiday is on the money, but the film tells me more than I ever wanted to know about Wyatt Earp.

SUPERB WESTERN & THOUGH A LOT OF IT FICTIONAL-(strangely considering Ford & Earp briefly got togeher?) But is easily among the top ten ever!

 

(P.S. Who's ever seen the legendary Bogdanovich 1971 documentary "A Conversation with Ford?)

 

(TRIVIA: & that famous bit with Hank putting his boots up on the pole & balancing himself, was his idea. Ford always had a theory that accidental stuff, must also be on screen) sadly, those 2 had a violent falling out during 'Mr. Roberts"-(hence 2 directors) but got back together as friends yrs later)

 

& you 4-gotFord stock player again WARD BOND!

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Remember Howard Hughes 1943-47 western "The 0utlaw" (barely **) It actually had W. Huston as Earp & Thomas Mitchell Pat Garrett?-(or vice-versa) & dull boy Jack Beutel as Billy the Kid

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Ya know, when it comes to Holliday, I've always thought Victor Mature gave one of his best performances ever in that role along side Fonda's Earp.

 

Agreed by far it was his only true strong work as an actor, but looks nada like Holliday?

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Agreed by far it was his only true strong work as an actor, but looks nada like Holliday?

Mature said in an interview  I read years ago that he considered his role of Doc Holiday the one he was most proud of. He also stated another time when a Country Club turned him down because they did not allow actors, that he was not an actor and he had 64 films to prove it..I always enjoyed him on screen, mostly his dramatic roles like "Kiss of Death", "I Wake Up Screaming" and especially "Cry of the City". I remember years later he came out of retirement to do "After the Fox" a Peter Sellers comedy where he parody of himself in a funny role..He later said about the script "it didn't make any sense to me, but it made me laugh"...I moved to Hollywood in 1969 and one day I was just driving around mainly sight seeing. I think I was on Wilshire Blvd. and I drove past this TV Appliance store "Victor Mature's TV's".. It was there for many years. I should have gone in...                                             

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Mature said in an interview  I read years ago that he considered his role of Doc Holiday the one he was most proud of. He also stated another time when a Country Club turned him down because they did not allow actors, that he was not an actor and he had 64 films to prove it..I always enjoyed him on screen, mostly his dramatic roles like "Kiss of Death", "I Wake Up Screaming" and especially "Cry of the City". I remember years later he came out of retirement to do "After the Fox" a Peter Sellers comedy where he parody of himself in a funny role..He later said about the script "it didn't make any sense to me, but it made me laugh"...I moved to Hollywood in 1969 and one day I was just driving around mainly sight seeing. I think I was on Wilshire Blvd. and I drove past this TV Appliance store "Victor Mature's TV's".. It was there for many years. I should have gone in...                                             

 

I don't find Mature right for the part of Doc Holiday in a western,  but the main reason maybe because I first saw the 3 noirs you mentioned and typecast him in my mind as a NY type of in-a-modern-setting actor.  

 

So when I see him as Doc it looks like he is acting and it doesn't come off as natural.  

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It's Garner for me because he played Wyatt Earp twice.

 

"Hour of the Gun" (1967), directed by John Sturges ("Gunfight at the O.K. Corral"), is a classic version of the war between the Earp Brothers (with their ally "Doc" Holliday) and the Clanton Gang.

 

 

 

Blake Edwards' "Sunset" (1988), a light mystery tale that teams Garner's older Earp with Bruce Willis as Tom Mix in 1920s' Hollywood, isn't as good. But I would have watched Garner read names and numbers from a phone book.

 

Garner apparently disliked working with Willis, whose career had taken off because of  TV's "Moonlighting" and would soar even higher months later with the release of "Die Hard." The veteran actor found the newcomer to be undisciplined.

 

 

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I don't find Mature right for the part of Doc Holiday in a western,  but the main reason maybe because I first saw the 3 noirs you mentioned and typecast him in my mind as a NY type of in-a-modern-setting actor.  

 

So when I see him as Doc it looks like he is acting and it doesn't come off as natural.  

 

Wait a second here, James!

 

You wouldn't happen to one of those people who first remembered watching a guy playing an amiable upper-middle class aerospace employed father raising three sons on TV, and then LATER couldn't wrap your head around discovering the SAME guy playing a guy who murders his paramour's husband in a flick that he made years earlier, now are you???!!! ;)

 

(...in other words, I STILL think Mature is pretty damn good as the tubercular old west dentist/gunfighter in that Ford movie)  :P

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I don't find Mature right for the part of Doc Holiday in a western,  but the main reason maybe because I first saw the 3 noirs you mentioned and typecast him in my mind as a NY type of in-a-modern-setting actor.  

 

So when I see him as Doc it looks like he is acting and it doesn't come off as natural.  

Ford's first choice for "Doc" Holiday was Douglas Fairbanks Jr. He said he believed that Fairbanks could have done a lot with the role and there was a strong resemblance to Holiday. But Zanuck forced Mature on him and a few days later Ford warmed to Mature and seemed pleased with his performance. It's possible or maybe Ford was having a hard time with Walter Brennan, they disliked each other, Brennan had trouble getting on a horse and Ford yelled "Can't you get on a horse" to which Brennan replied "No, But I have three Academy Awards for acting". They never worked together again. or the fact Mature was in the Coast Guard during the was and Ford was a Navy man...

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Ford's first choice for "Doc" Holiday was Douglas Fairbanks Jr. He said he believed that Fairbanks could have done a lot with the role and there was a strong resemblance to Holiday. But Zanuck forced Mature on him and a few days later Ford warmed to Mature and seemed pleased with his performance. It's possible or maybe Ford was having a hard time with Walter Brennan, they disliked each other, Brennan had trouble getting on a horse and Ford yelled "Can't you get on a horse" to which Brennan replied "No, But I have three Academy Awards for acting". They never worked together again. or the fact Mature was in the Coast Guard during the was and Ford was a Navy man...

 

Uh-huh! SEE James?! If that cantankerous old f-art FORD could see this with just ONE good eye, then what's YOUR problem here, young man???!!!

 

LOL

 

;)

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(...in other words, I STILL think Mature is pretty damn good as the tubercular old west dentist/gunfighter in that Ford movie)  :P

 

You KNOW a statement like THAT Will insure that my Mom will arrange for you to have your own special corner in HEAVEN, don'tcha?  ;)

 

 

Sepiatone

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