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Atrocious closed captions...

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I like closed captions... except when they're badly done, which seems to be the case more often lately.

I can't remember all, but in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde with Spencer Tracy, too often the CC subtitles lapse into "(inaudible)" for words that aren't that hard to hear or figure out. Then for Blondie of the Follies, there are spelling mistakes... Barrimore (or worse) for Barrymore, and when Jimmy Durante says "Garbo!" several times, the subtitles show: Garble. I don't know if it's a machine or an English As a Second Language transcriber, but it gets pathetic sometimes. "Garble!" "Garble!" Might have as well said "Gobble, gobble". Should be better.

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I like closed captions... except when they're badly done, which seems to be the case more often lately.

I can't remember all, but in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde with Spencer Tracy, too often the CC subtitles lapse into "(inaudible)" for words that aren't that hard to hear or figure out. Then for Blondie of the Follies, there are spelling mistakes... Barrimore (or worse) for Barrymore, and when Jimmy Durante says "Garbo!" several times, the subtitles show: Garble. I don't know if it's a machine or an English As a Second Language transcriber, but it gets pathetic sometimes. "Garble!" "Garble!" Might have as well said "Gobble, gobble". Should be better.

 

The worst captioning I've ever seen was on a TCM broadcast of Brighton Rock a few years ago. I turned the captions on hoping they would help me on some hard-to-understand British accents, but no sale. I actually understood what a lot of the British actors were saying, but the captions were atrociously bad, nowhere close to what the actors were saying. Like your example, there was one instance in Brighton Rock where the caption said "unintelligible," but I could understand perfectly what was said.

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The worst captioning I've ever seen was on a TCM broadcast of Brighton Rock a few years ago. I turned the captions on hoping they would help me on some hard-to-understand British accents, but no sale. I actually understood what a lot of the British actors were saying, but the captions were atrociously bad, nowhere close to what the actors were saying. Like your example, there was one instance in Brighton Rock where the caption said "unintelligible," but I could understand perfectly what was said.

So, I would assume however that because that movie took place in Ole Blighty, every time words such as "color" or "labor" or "neighbor" was said by one of those limeys, the closed captions probably included that letter "u" which as any good ol' American knows is really not needed, right Dan?!

 

;)

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The only time I see closed captions is when I go to the doctor and the set in the waiting room has the feature turned on.

 

So far, I've yet to see closed captions that AREN'T atrocious.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Close captions can come on handy if one want to understand what word(s) a person said, getting a name of a song or artist.

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Close captions can come on handy if one want to understand what word(s) a person said, getting a name of a song or artist.

 

WAIT, ham! "Can come ON handy if one WANT to", ya say?!

 

Are YOU perchance moonlighting as a transcriber at one of those closed captioned companies or somethin' lately, dude???

 

(...sorry...couldn't resist) ;)

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So, I would assume however that because that movie took place in Ole Blighty, every time words such as "color" or "labor" or "neighbor" was said by one of those limeys, the closed captions probably included that letter "u" which as any good ol' American knows is really not needed, right Dan?!

 

;)

 

I can't remember, but I'd say the "u" was probably left out because the captioning was likely done by an American with poor understanding of British speakers and spelling style.

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I can't remember, but I'd say the "u" was probably left out because the captioning was likely done by an American with poor understanding of British speakers and spelling style.

 

OH, you mean how the Brits seem incapable of pronouncing the letter "r"?

 

YOU know, as in such things as, "Why, yes Mate. I'll have a glass of 'WOE-tah', please!"

 

And whereas any good ol' American knows that that wet stuff is pronounced "WAH-ter".

 

Well, unless of course that "good ol' American" happens to have been born and bred along the upper eastern seaboard, and THEN we're back to all that "incapable of pronouncing the letter "r" thing again, of course. ;)

 

(...hey now dude, don't get me wrong here...I LOVE the Brits and just enjoy being "cheeky" with 'em...and besides they make GREAT motorcycles...Triumphs in particular...I have three of 'em)

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I like closed captions... except when they're badly done, which seems to be the case more often lately.

I can't remember all, but in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde with Spencer Tracy, too often the CC subtitles lapse into "(inaudible)" for words that aren't that hard to hear or figure out. Then for Blondie of the Follies, there are spelling mistakes... Barrimore (or worse) for Barrymore, and when Jimmy Durante says "Garbo!" several times, the subtitles show: Garble. I don't know if it's a machine or an English As a Second Language transcriber, but it gets pathetic sometimes. "Garble!" "Garble!" Might have as well said "Gobble, gobble". Should be better.

 

I remember one other movie channel that used an auto voice-recognition system for Closed Captions, and I used to watch its steady horrendous Misheard-Lyrics mistakes for about five minutes for a laugh before realizing it wasn't worth it.

It seems to be used by most channels that don't air network shows (network production usually has their own department to handle the CC'ing before it airs), but don't think they have the time to convert an entire library to closed-captions.

 

Some of the ridiculous mistakes on Amazon Prime movie captions, however, seem to be human error, at least when not "(Indistinct)" because the subber couldn't understand some thick accent or bad delivery.

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I didn't realize there were so many forum members here that were hard of hearing to make this some kind of concern to begin with.

 

My brother in law, who IS hard of hearing, has his OWN solution.

 

He cranks up the volume to where his TV can be heard TWO BLOCKS OVER!  :D

 

 

Sepiatone

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I didn't realize there were so many forum members here that were hard of hearing to make this some kind of concern to begin with.

 

My brother in law, who IS hard of hearing, has his OWN solution.

 

He cranks up the volume to where his TV can be heard TWO BLOCKS OVER!  :D

 

 

Sepiatone

 

And this now reminds me of....

 

dff91bcfa4384741e87505d63e2a46b9.jpg

 

"GOOD NIGHT, AND HAVE A PLEASANT TOMORROW!"

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I didn't realize there were so many forum members here that were hard of hearing to make this some kind of concern to begin with.

 

I don't, but if I'm eating popcorn with a movie, I like knowing what I'm missing.   ^_^

I also live in an apartment, and therefore have no speaker system (it's been a long time since I moved out of the dorms) and like to keep the volume down to a comfortable minimum.  

I usually leave disk captions on anyway, since act-ing! in a classic movie can often render a line indecipherable.

 

And...you find you sort of get used to it anyway after a heavy diet of subtitled foreign films or anime.

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I didn't realize there were so many forum members here that were hard of hearing to make this some kind of concern to begin with.

 

My brother in law, who IS hard of hearing, has his OWN solution.

 

He cranks up the volume to where his TV can be heard TWO BLOCKS OVER!  :D

 

 

Sepiatone

I don't live within two blocks of anybody, so I don't see the problem. :)

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OH, you mean how the Brits seem incapable of pronouncing the letter "r"?

 

YOU know, as in such things as, "Why, yes Mate. I'll have a glass of 'WOE-tah', please!"

 

And whereas any good ol' American knows that that wet stuff is pronounced "WAH-ter".

 

Well, unless of course that "good ol' American" happens to have been born and bred along the upper eastern seaboard, and THEN we're back to all that "incapable of pronouncing the letter "r" thing again, of course. ;)

 

Hey, Dargo, Americans pronounce "water" a lot of different ways. WAH-ter is the standard pronunciation, but, as you say, along the eastern seaboard people don't pronounce their R's. Also, in the Deep South I've heard WAW-tuh, in the Inland South it's "wadder," and in Baltimore it's "wutter." Or, should I say, in Balmer it's "wutter."

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Hey, Dargo, Americans pronounce "water" a lot of different ways. WAH-ter is the standard pronunciation, but, as you say, along the eastern seaboard people don't pronounce their R's. Also, in the Deep South I've heard WAW-tuh, in the Inland South it's "wadder," and in Baltimore it's "wutter." Or, should I say, in Balmer it's "wutter."

 

Yep kingrat, and seeing as how Baltimore isn't all that far from Philly, this must explain why our newest neighbors in here in Sedona, Michael and Linda who hail from The City of Brotherly Love, seem to pronounce the word "water" as "worder". 

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