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Franco Zefferilli

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Also the moon never rose as high as it did when Charlton Heston looked at himself naked. Funny thing about Planet of the Apes. (Yes I know he didn't direct that one.) He never discussed the skinny dipping scene with his bro-buddies (much like Mel Gibson pretending it never happened in Gallipoli), but he bragged in two interviews I recall about his "tribunal" with the orangutans and the one female crew member commenting "not bad" about his behind. Gotta keep the story "straight", you know...

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Also the moon never rose as high as it did when Charlton Heston looked at himself naked. Funny thing about Planet of the Apes. (Yes I know he didn't direct that one.) He never discussed the skinny dipping scene with his bro-buddies (much like Mel Gibson pretending it never happened in Gallipoli), but he bragged in two interviews I recall about his "tribunal" with the orangutans and the one female crew member commenting "not bad" about his behind. Gotta keep the story "straight", you know...

LOL  yeah because none of the male crew members were checking out Heston's butt

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I guess you mean in a Luchino Visconti/Massimo Girotti Ossessione sense. Massimo sure got more focus in various states of undress than Clara Calamai. Then again, she already appeared topless in a previous film, so it was only natural that he took over the topless scenes. Massimo was pretty straight but I am sure his "method" acting was improved behind closed doors with his director. This was a period when Mussolini was less focused on "rounding them up" like Hitler and everybody could do what they want to get ahead in their careers as long as the Italian front remained macho enough before the Allies invaded. (Massimo got all naked and romped around Mt. Etna 24 years later in Passolini's Teorema. Not sure if Pasolini did any coaching behind closed doors there as well since he was too easily distracted by the much younger Terence Stamp.)

Pasolini liked young men who did not have a polished exterior; and his first choice for the young man in "Teorema" was Lee Van Cleef.

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Zeffrelli's films - not his opera translations - are blessed with an extravagant "emotionalism" that I find irresistible.

 

Even a film like "Brother Sun, Sister Moon" - a film about religious conversion - a new-found belief in the divine power of God - delves into its' subject matter with a "ferocity" that borders on obsession rather than conviction.

 

But men like St. Francis of Assisi could not have been ordinary men.

 

What I find upsetting about the reception and reputation of "Brother Sun, Sister Moon" is that its' true value has never been appreciated.

 

To an increasingly secular world, such a film seems, as one reviewer did put it, "sappy".

 

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Franco Zefferilli -

 

How would you rate him? -

 

1. "The Taming of the Shrew"

 

2. "La Boehme"

 

3 ."Romeo and Juliet"

 

4. "Brother Sun, Sister Moon"

 

5. "The Champ"

 

6. "Endless Love"

 

7 "I Pagliacci"

 

8. "La Traviata"

 

9. "Tosca"

 

10. "Otello"

 

11. "Hamlet"

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You forgot Jesus of Nazareth, probably the only religious epic I bothered watching twice... simply because of the Hollywood who's who involved.

 

I know TopBilled isn't a fan... ha ha!... but I still favor Romeo & Juliet the best. I also like Burton and Taylor too in Shrew. There are so many reasons why I like R&J, even though they may be all of the wrong reasons.

 

Leonard's over acting. I mean... you gotta admit that he put his all into this, even if Olivia Hussey is a trifle more impatient and hyper. So many scenes to relish, but my favorite is his five o'clock shadow looking-about when he bellows "I defy you stars!!!!"

 

Every shot with "Nurse" Pat Heywood. A sail! A sail!

 

Bumbling Friar Milo O'Shea being just as impotent in trying to save the sobbing couple as he was trying to woo Rose Nylund (Betty White) by pretending to know her deceased husband in that famous Golden Girls episode.

 

An exhausted Bruce Robinson (the one the director supposedly hit on) telling John McEnery "Mercutio" how hot it is, while Mercutio is busy sucking in his hankie.

 

The very slooooow donkey that doesn't deliver the news of Juliet's fake death in time. No wonder the Pony Express was invented later.

 

A vault scene that looks borrowed from a Hammer Films production, even though you know this is the wrong country of filming.

 

All of those goofy telephoto zooms.

 

Most importantly, Nino Rota's endlessly repetitive theme music. (Granted, The Godfather was even more so.)

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You forgot Jesus of Nazareth, probably the only religious epic I bothered watching twice... simply because of the Hollywood who's who involved.

 

I know TopBilled isn't a fan... ha ha!... but I still favor Romeo & Juliet the best. I also like Burton and Taylor too in Shrew. There are so many reasons why I like R&J, even though they may be all of the wrong reasons.

 

Leonard's over acting. I mean... you gotta admit that he put his all into this, even if Olivia Hussey is a trifle more impatient and hyper. So many scenes to relish, but my favorite is his five o'clock shadow looking-about when he bellows "I defy you stars!!!!"

 

Every shot with "Nurse" Pat Heywood. A sail! A sail!

 

Bumbling Friar Milo O'Shea being just as impotent in trying to save the sobbing couple as he was trying to woo Rose Nylund (Betty White) by pretending to know her deceased husband in that famous Golden Girls episode.

 

An exhausted Bruce Robinson (the one the director supposedly hit on) telling John McEnery "Mercutio" how hot it is, while Mercutio is busy sucking in his hankie.

 

The very slooooow donkey that doesn't deliver the news of Juliet's fake death in time. No wonder the Pony Express was invented later.

 

A vault scene that looks borrowed from a Hammer Films production, even though you know this is the wrong country of filming.

 

All of those goofy telephoto zooms.

 

Most importantly, Nino Rota's endlessly repetitive theme music. (Granted, The Godfather was even more so.)

"Jesus of Nazareth" with Robert Powell was a made-for-TV film.

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