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slaytonf

Now, that's the way to die!

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Yes, a morbid topic, but the one thing I admired about Men in White (1934) in this week's Gablefest was Barbara's death scene.  Spare almost to abstraction, lacking the spasms and milking for every last ounce of pathos that are common elsewhere, it's one of the few reserved and dignified death scenes I can think of.  It's also one of the few open eyed death scenes in movies, at least for this time, and makes me wonder if this movie got out before the vigorous enforcement of the production code.  Here's a still:

 

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She's already dead, but he doesn't realize it yet.  Adolphe Menjou has another good one in Forbidden (1932).  Here it is:

 

 

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I like the subtle "hand drop" death scenes. Examples of these are:

1- Walter Huston's death scene in Yankee Doodle Dandy

2- Gladys George's death scene in Now Voyager

3- Gene Tierney's death scene in The Ghost And Mrs. Muir

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Then there's those "quiet exits" in which one second they seem jut tired and sleeping but next you know they're gone.

 

There's plenty of them, but I can "top of my head" only  come up with a few.  Like:

 

ZEFFIE TILBURY as Grandma Joad in THE GRAPES OF WRATH

 

CHARLIE GRAPEWIN also in "Grapes".

 

TOM HULCE in AMADEUS

 

SAM BOTTOMS in THE OWTLAW JOSEY WALES

 

 

Sepiatone

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I liked the way Lizabeth Scot backed over that balcony in, "Too Late for Tears."

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Ronald Colman in A Double Life

 

He dies in mid sentence with his eyes open. He's there and then suddenly gone, with a light seeming to vanish from his eyes. It's a beautifully understated moment of acting which struck me as an honest portrayal of quiet death.

 

No Hollywood melodrama here.

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Not exactly a death scene but I'm always stupified by Bette Davis as Stanley in, "In This Our Lives,"  shouting at almost dead Charles Coburn:

 

Stanley Timberlake: All right, so you're going to die! But you're an old man, you've lived your life - I haven't lived mine - mine's hardly begun. Think of *me* uncle! Think of what'll happen to *me* if you don't get me out of this. You're not even listening! You don't care what happens to me any more than the others. You'd *let* me go to prison. All you're thinking of is your own miserable life. Well you can die for all I care! *Die!*
 

 

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All things considered, I wouldn't mind going out the way Don Ameche does in 1943's HEAVEN CAN WAIT...of old age while lying in my nice comfortable bed and being attended to by a beautiful young nurse.

 

(...now THAT'S the way to go!) ;)

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How about this death scene? :lol::lol:

 

 

 

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Joan Crawford's last scene in Humoresque-- and that's where they should have ended the movie too.-- The most beautiful

 

The most suspenseful and shocking-- Kim Novak in Vertigo

 

The most poignantly courageous-- Bette Davis in Dark Victory

 

The most kitschy-- Margaret O'Brien in Little Women

 

The sweetest-- Jeanette MacDonald in May time

 

The saddest-- Fred Astaire in The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle

 

The worst-- Susan Hayward in I Want To Live!

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All things considered, I wouldn't mind going out the way Don Ameche does in 1943's HEAVEN CAN WAIT...of old age while lying in my nice comfortable bed and being attended to by a beautiful young nurse.

I'd like to die peacefully in my sleep like my grandfather did. Not screaming like the passengers in his car.

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More seriously, two movies that have cinematically interesting death scenes are The Cranes Are Flying and Sparrows.

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The most poignantly courageous-- Bette Davis in Dark Victory

 

 

A good death.

 

 

The worst-- Susan Hayward in I Want To Live!

 

 

The most excruciating scene I can think of.  

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Can't beat dying to save the ship and shot out in a photon torpedo. :D

 

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I'd like to die peacefully in my sleep like my grandfather did. Not screaming like the passengers in his car.

I always liked that one.  Have it on a plaque  hanging in my living room.  :)

 

 

Sepiatone

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Susan Hayward's execution in I Want To Live was very disturbing,

 but Michael Jeter's execution in The Green Mile was the most excruciating, IMO.

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Edit: Tried to delete a double post, but clearly I don't know how :unsure:

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I like the subtle "hand drop" death scenes. Examples of these are:

1- Walter Huston's death scene in Yankee Doodle Dandy

2- Gladys George's death scene in Now Voyager

3- Gene Tierney's death scene in The Ghost And Mrs. Muir

 

I'd add Maureen O'Hara in The Long Gray Line to that list.

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A classic hero's death:

 

ec04ef05c21143af0da8335a5247dd5d.png

 

Errol Flynn in They Died With Their Boots On

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I'd like to die peacefully in my sleep like my grandfather did. Not screaming like the passengers in his car.

POST OF THE WEEK RIGHT HERE.

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 but Michael Jeter's execution in The Green Mile was the most excruciating, IMO.

Hell, I KNEW it was only a movie but it bothered me a lot too.

 

JOE PANTOLIANO being thrown into a huge wood chipping machine in DOWNTOWN('90)  seemed kind of gruesome too.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Nothing quite like a slow motion 18 storey fall

 

th0ncanzzc7bwkami9rz.gif

 

Alan Rickman in Die Hard

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Noir films have some good falling from a window death scenes; e.g.  Agnes Moorehead in Dark Passage and William Bendix  in The Dark Corner.

 

 

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Of course, there's also Norman Lloyd's famous death scene by falling from the Statue of Liberty's torch in Saboteur.

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Nothing quite like a slow motion 18 storey fall

 

th0ncanzzc7bwkami9rz.gif

 

Alan Rickman in Die Hard

 

 

That's the way he deserved to die. :D

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