slaytonf

Now, that's the way to die!

73 posts in this topic

6 minutes ago, Dargo said:

WAIT! I think I see your point now.

You're sayin' I should be "satisfied" with seein' Errol with an arrow in his back REGARDLESS that it's not in TDWTBO, huh.

Well then, let me make this perfectly clear here. I NEVER like seein' Errol with an arrow in him, and UNLESS it's so I can legitimately make that old joke that goes, "Custer wore an Arrow Shirt", dude!

(...okay, and now I HOPE you understand my position about all this!!!) ;) 

Don't worry, Dargo. Few people know or care that Custer was killed by bullets. That old Arrow Shirt joke will still work.

Nice to see your sensitivity about Errol with an arrow sticking out of him, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, TomJH said:

BINGO!

I never said it's a shot from TDWTBO. I just decided to give you an image of what you said you wanted to see.

It's from Errol's last western, ROCKY MOUNTAIN (a good, sturdy little film, by the way, with, as you may gather here from this photo, an exciting climax).

And don't be too hard on Walsh. The director knew the real Custer was killed by bullets, not arrows. At least the film was historically accurate in that respect.

I bet that picture of Errol with the arrows in his back driving you back to that You Tube video to double check TDWTBO was really driving you nuts, eh, Dargo?

Wait! So, Custer never had ANY arrows in him during that battle?

Well, I suppose there goes ANOTHER old joke I can't use anymore, EH?!!!

(...oh and btw...in your last sentence in the above here, you of course SHOULD have used the word "nuttIER" instead of just "nuts") ;)

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Dargo said:

Wait! So, Custer never had ANY arrows in him during that battle?

Well, I suppose there goes ANOTHER old joke I can't use anymore, EH?!!!

(...oh and btw...in your last sentence in the above here, you of course SHOULD have used the word "nuttIER" instead of just "nuts") ;)

Nah, don't give up on that joke. Who cares about historical accuracy when it comes to getting a good laugh?

groucho.jpg

"History, who cares about that? I'm far more interested in hearing her story."

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, TomJH said:

Nah, don't give up on that joke. Who cares about historical accuracy when it comes to getting a good laugh?

groucho.jpg

"History, who cares about that? I'm far more interested in hearing her story."

Ya know THIS now reminds me of young lady I once knew who had many an historical event tattooed on her body!

(...ah yes, Lydia...you could learn a lot from HER, alright!)

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/19/2017 at 7:25 AM, sagebrush said:

I like the subtle "hand drop" death scenes. Examples of these are:

1- Walter Huston's death scene in Yankee Doodle Dandy

2- Gladys George's death scene in Now Voyager

3- Gene Tierney's death scene in The Ghost And Mrs. Muir

Another "hand drop" death scene example is Helen Westley in Roberta, after Irene Dunne sings "Yesterdays" to the napping Aunt Minnie.

(Btw, I think you mean Gladys Cooper in Now Voyager.)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gotta say, to this day and every time I see Orson Welles sticking his fingers through that Vienna sewer grate just before you hear Joseph Cotten finishing him off, I still somehow hope to see that SOB Harry Lime make it out of there alive.

(...they say that's the mark of an actor playing a villain well, ya know)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Gotta say, to this day and every time I see Orson Welles sticking his fingers through that Vienna sewer grate just before you hear Joseph Cotten finishing him off, I still somehow hope to see that SOB Harry Lime make it out of there alive.

(...they say that's the mark of an actor playing a villain well, ya know)

 

I think most people will root for the hare over the hounds, especially when there are so many of those hounds.

The_Third_Man_5.jpg?w=1200&h=600&fit=thu

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, TomJH said:

I think most people will root for the hare over the hounds, especially when there are so many of those hounds.

The_Third_Man_5.jpg?w=1200&h=600&fit=thu

 

 

 

Paul Manafort is counting on that! 

 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Swithin said:

(Btw, I think you mean Gladys Cooper in Now Voyager.)

Yes. You know, twice I tried to edit that to correct it, and when I submit, it is my original post again.  I blame the Korean spam!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

--- the final moments of Sorry Wrong Number

--- the final moments of The Strange Love of Martha Ivers

(Thank you, Barbara Stanwyck!)

--- Agnes Moorehead in Dark Passage

--- the characters played by Alec Guinness in Kind Hearts and Coronets

--- the crooks in Charade....very gruesome scenes!

--- Hitchcock films with memorable death scenes: Blackmail, Rope, Dial M For Murder, etc.

--- the murder victim in the French film The Seventh Juror

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it takes a lot of guts to kill off your comic relief.  Probably the most shocking and brutal death scene I remember from childhood is Frank McHugh's lifeless body being thrown from a gangster's car in The Roaring Twenties (1939).  McHugh plays James Cagney's best pal, a lighthearted bootlegger whom everyone loves.  When Cagney runs afoul of rival gangster Paul Kelly, Kelly's boys murder McHugh (offscreen) to send a message to Cagney.  The sight of McHugh's face and eyes frozen in terror as he lay on the sidewalk says it all --- he was brutally beaten to death, not shot quickly.  It's almost like seeing the body of an innocent little child who's just been savagely murdered.  It didn't exactly traumatize me as kid, but 40 years later, I still remember the shock I felt when I first saw this movie.

It's almost as disturbing as a death scene I saw much later --- comic relief Slim Pickens being slaughtered (by an 18-wheeler) by a nasty gang of hookers and thugs in 1975's White Line Fever

Another instance from the Golden Age of the comedy relief being murdered is Charles Winninger, the town drunk/sheriff, in Destry Rides Again (1939).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about Vera Clouzot's death scene toward the end of DIABOLIQUE? Very suspenseful!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No one did a death scene more dramatically than Cagney, and he did quite a few:

"THE ROARING TWENTIES"

"ANGELS WITH DIRTY FACES" (Pat O'Brien begs him to turn 'yellow' so the kids won't regard him as a hero.  He refuses.  But at the last minute he pretends cowardice.)

"THE PUBLIC ENEMY" (After shooting up a den of fellow mobsters who'd threatened to kill his brother.  I love when he throws his empty guns at the building.)

And of course there's "WHITE HEAT"

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/19/2017 at 7:25 AM, sagebrush said:

I like the subtle "hand drop" death scenes.

Yul Brynner did a very nice one in 'The King and I' (1956).

Very dignified and moving.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And now under the heading of, "Now, that's NOT the way to die":

Richard Jaeckel's death scene in...

sometimesagreatnotion_posterart.jpg?part

(...I remember watching this film when it was first released back in '71, and this scene stayed with me for weeks)

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll mention a death scene I don't like:

Omar Shariff's heart attack in DR. ZHIVAGO. Not that I think the scene isn't done well; it's just so sad that he is trying so hard to get to Lara, but keeps getting jolted by pain as she walks on, completely unaware that she is being pursued.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One example, haunting not for the death, but for the images that follow, comes in William Wellman's The Light That Failed (1939).  The now-blind artist Dick Heldar (played by Ronald Colman) makes his way to a battlefield, and get's friends there to put him into a cavalry charge, and then:

The video is dark, but you get the picture.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎8‎/‎16‎/‎2018 at 6:38 AM, sagebrush said:

I'll mention a death scene I don't like:

Omar Shariff's heart attack in DR. ZHIVAGO. Not that I think the scene isn't done well; it's just so sad that he is trying so hard to get to Lara, but keeps getting jolted by pain as she walks on, completely unaware that she is being pursued.

Poignant scene.

But I do like it, sad though it is.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about Boris Karloff's death scene by way of being entombed in the wall by the mental patients in BEDLAM?  ?

(Suffocating to death is a fear I've had most of my life.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't know if this was already mentioned, or what other movies a similar death occurred, but how about the way Tom Hulce's MOZART died in AMADEUS?  Just drifted off......

Sepiatone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And now, my nomination as the looooooooongest death scene of the movies. . .

Stephen Boyd in BEN HUR

fullscreen-capture-6292016-15312-pm-bmp.

When I first saw this film at the show this actor stretched out his death agonies so much I was afraid a TO BE CONTINUED. COME BACK TOMORROW FOR THE REST OF THE FILM sign was going to pop up.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us