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PFriedman

The New Julie Andrews Thread

47 posts in this topic

> Why would you look up a review to determine what it

> would be like to see the film when it came out? How

> does a review do that? Films are a current medium.

> They are as current as when they are being watched.

> Don't you have an opinion of your own?

 

No, sorry, she seems to be incapable of forming her own opinions about anything that is not validated somehow by one of her all mighty critics. It's really sad, actually, that she doesn't feel free to use her own mind.

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Relax guys.

 

I've read a couple of cinemascopes' copies of Crowthers reviews, and although unnecessary IMHO, this was is absolutely ludicrous, silly, and totally not worth the paper it was printed on.

 

How stupid to compare Harrison's portrayal of Doolittle to My Fair Ladys' Higgins.

How stupid to compare the songs to My Fair Ladys'. How stupid to say the pace is slow and without surprise. How stupid to say it is not for a sophisticated taste. Someone should have told this clod he was reviewing a CHILDRENS' [/i]movie. I wonder how many 5 to 8 year olds had the experience or knowledge to compare Harrisons' acting job to that of his role in MFL, or whether the songs sounded suspiciously like those from MFL. And how many 5 to 8 years olds have any kind of sophisticated 'taste' except those in their mouth? The only 'sophistication' they have is whether they prefer chocolate or strawberry ice cream!

 

I've watched many movies with my kids and grand kids; while I was bored to bits, they laughed their little butts off.

 

This idiot review isn't worth getting into a hassle over. If cinemascope needs to use someone elses' words to say "I like it" or "I don't like it", that's her perogative. I just wish she would use a URL instead of printing the whole review and let people choose whether they want to read it or not. In fact, this review gave me quite a laugh on a rather dull morning.

 

Anne

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All I know is I saw Dr. Doolittle as a kid and loved it then, and when seeing it again recently, I thought many of the songs in the score were very good, even though some of them are sung to animals, and why not. It might be long and have its problems, but seeing it again brought back some great memories. Ditto Chitty, Chitty, Bang, Bang! Merely my opinion! LOL! When I was 5, I didn't read Bosley Crother.

 

PFriedman

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Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley wrote some wonderful songs in general for "Stop the World, I Want to Get Off" and "The Roar of the Greasepaint" The score by Leslie Bricusse for "Dr Doolittle" is no different. I love the song Rex Harrison sings to the seal "When I Look Into Your Eyes" and Samantha Eggar's pretty feminist lament "Crossroads of Life". "Talk to the Animals" is alot of fun and won the Oscar. I'm a sucker for films I loved as a kid.

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Malkat:

> You should never watch bad movies as a kid. You grow

> up touting them, only to be laughed at and put down,

> and you don't know why.

 

I seriously don't understand you on this remark. You don't know it's a bad movie until you see it, especially as a kid. Plus, if you liked it, as a kid, why would anyone put you down or laugh at you?

 

Cinemascope:

 

What you said in your last post, about out-growing some movies, goes without saying. When I was a teen, I never missed a 'Beach' movie because I loved Frankie and Annette, and Fabian and all the rest, and to me at that time, they were the best. I watched them eagerly when TCM ran them last summer, and couldn't understand myself. What in the world did I ever see in them? But, for nostalgia's sake, I enjoyed my afternoon. However, later, when TCM kept repeating them, I said Enough! Todays' teens couldn't possibly like them because they don't know the actors, and the music probably makes them laugh their butts off, not to mention how they deal with moral issues.

 

Oh, I'm sure some sat and watched with Mom for Mom's sake, but compare any of them with 'Mean Girls' and there is no comparison at all.

 

Put me down on the list of fans of Valley of the Dolls also, and I also love Julie Andrews as the countess or whatever she is in the Princess Diaries.

 

SueSueApplegate:

 

Ahhh, but theres the rub, the same industry that catered to teens with fairly decent movies, is now catering to that same age bracket with an entirely different course of direction, aiming at their dark sides.

 

 

Anne

 

Message was edited by:

mrsl

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This idiot review isn't worth getting into a hassle over. If cinemascope needs to use someone elses' words to say "I like it" or "I don't like it", that's her perogative. I just wish she would use a URL instead of printing the whole review and let people choose whether they want to read it or not.

 

Not to mention that it is a copyright infringment for the review to be posted in full, on these boards.

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And I thought Malkat was being sarcastic, which I thought was funny. I guess Malkat was being serious, which is not so funny. Malkat - How horrible you had to go through that.

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300 is all the rage with the generation that grew up with full-throttle video games. Even though I haven't seen it,

I have seen theatrical previews, and the preview I saw

seemed like an adult video computer-generated aniimation

fest.

 

Message was edited by:

SueSueApplegate

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She says in the interview that the next film she planned on doing after "Hawaii" was one called "The Private Eye" directed by Mike Nichols.

 

The project was called THE PUBLIC EYE. It was never done. It was a play at the Globe Theatre, with Maggie Smith. Nichols who is a long-time friend of Julie's, was slated to direct the film version, and wanted her for the role; but, for reasons I cannot recall, or never knew, it didn't happen. I think Hitchcock intervened.

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Thanks - Have you ever read that interview - It's interesting to read an interview with JA from a 1966 perspective.

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Oh -- wouldn't you say it's generally always interesting to read any interview with any classic or older actor from a perspective of an earlier time? B-)

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In case you haven't gotten it through your fat skull, nobody cares what you think!

 

For the record, TCMWebAdmin

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