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malkat

Into The Woods

55 posts in this topic

I am by no means an authority on Sondheim, but I did find this fairly interesting analysis:

 

Though Sweeney Todd is a top-drawer musical, it falls short of Sondheim classics like Company, Sunday In The Park With George, and Into The Woods because its metaphors seem less personal. Where other Sondheim works turn history and psychology into keen explorations of adult fears, Sweeney Todd uses a more conventional (albeit macabre) story to critique how capitalism and urban industrialization combine to chew up human beings. Still, Sweeney Todd, like The Last Of Sheila, is essential to understanding Sondheim's personality, which encompasses both a generous spirit and a dark side. When Hearn and Lansbury romp through the song "A Little Priest," imagining how various classes of people might taste, Sondheim lets his latent misanthropy rage.

http://www.avclub.com/content/node/7947

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The first time I saw it, I paid. The second time, it was on a comp. I think Sondheim is the worst thing that ever happened to Broadway.

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I don't know if Johnm is gone or not, but in any case, I just read early this mornings' posts and wondered what Steven Sondheim had to do with WSS?

 

If he did anything at all, it was producing, and it was over 40 years ago, any mistakes he made were when he was starting out I imagine.

 

Anne

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Yes, malkat:

 

He wrote the lyrics. I never new that. Music, orchestration, arrangements etc. were all done by a 4 man team, not including Sondheim.

 

Anne

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Here's an interesting bit of Sondheim trivia that happens to involve TCM:

 

Stephen Sondheim was the Turner Classic Movies programmer for March 22, 2005, the cable network's way of honoring him on his 75th birthday. The six films he picked for his birthday tribute were The Mind Reader (1933), starring the under-appreciated Warren William as a con-man posing as a clairvoyant; The Clock (1945), Vincente Minnelli's classic film of war-time love, starring Judy Garland & Robert Walker; Smiles of a Summer Night (1955), the Ingmar Bergman classic on which he based his "Little Night Music, A"; Out of the Fog (1941), an ur-noir starring the ur-Brando, the great John Garfield, plus the always intriguing Ida Lupino; Night Must Fall (1937), the classic thriller in which Robert Montgomery first played against type, this time as a serial killer who carries around a head in a hat-box; and Torchy Blane in Chinatown (1938), starring brassy Glenda Farrell as a brassy female reporter who never goes near Chinatown.

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I love Sondheim. I've been in local theatre productions of several of his shows--Sweeney Todd (Mrs. Lovett), Into the Woods (Lucinda), Merrily We Roll Along (Beth), Anyone Can Whistle (Cora Hoover Hooper). He is not for everyone, and he can be a bit of an acquired taste.

 

Anne, Sweeney Todd is like a Victorian thriller/melodrama. It is not as gross as it sounds. Seeing fake blood on stage doesn't look as graphic as it does on film. I am excited for the Tim Burton film version, though.

 

I think that music from Sweeney Todd is very beautiful, and layered with meaning.

 

Sandy K

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> I love Sondheim. I've been in local theatre

> productions of several of his shows--Sweeney Todd

> (Mrs. Lovett), Into the Woods (Lucinda), Merrily We

> Roll Along (Beth), Anyone Can Whistle (Cora Hoover

> Hooper). He is not for everyone, and he can be a bit

> of an acquired taste.

>

> Anne, Sweeney Todd is like a Victorian

> thriller/melodrama. It is not as gross as it sounds.

> Seeing fake blood on stage doesn't look as graphic as

> it does on film. I am excited for the Tim Burton film

> version, though.

>

> I think that music from Sweeney Todd is very

> beautiful, and layered with meaning.

>

> Sandy K

 

I've always liked everything he's done... and knowing Tim Burton's directing the film version of Sweeney Todd makes it even more exciting! B-)

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The last Tim Burton movie I saw was Corpse Bride, which I LOVED! A Tim Burton film is always something to look forward to.

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I have to admit though, I'm a little leery when it comes to approaching Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. I loved the Gene Wilder version, and to be honest I'm not at all sure about this one.

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It's different but good in its own unique ways. And since Gene Wilder's always been one of my least favorite screen comics, I am very much fonder of the Burton version. :D

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A very charming man, of course. Still may want to check out the Burton version, even if you don't like it quite as much you might still have fun B-)

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I just saw both versions, quite recently, for the first time. I found the one with Johnny Depp, to be rather like af freak show, completely void of charm. The Gene Wilder version, has charm to spare. I was surprised I was so charmed by the Wilder version, because, other than The Producers, I've never been a fan. My biggest issue with the Depp version, is Depp himself. He's just freaky, without any real reason to be so. His characterization makes no sense to me.

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Depp has always gone for the offbeat, and nowhere more so than in movies like Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and the Pirates of the Caribbean movies. You don't go to watch a movie with Johnny Depp and expect a "normal" performance.

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