Sign in to follow this  
jinsinna13

Male Co-Stars With The Best Chemistry

8 posts in this topic

Feel free to list as many examples you want. Here are some of mine:

 

Chris O'Donnell and LL Cool J: NCIS: Los Angeles

Alex O'Loughlin and Scott Caan: Hawaii Five-O (2010-)

Dirk Benedict and Richard Hatch: Battlestar Galactica (1978-1979)

Mark Goddard and Jonathan Harris: Lost in Space

Robert Vaughn and David McCallum: The Man From U.N.C.L.E.

Paul Newman and Robert Redford: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and The Sting

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it weren't for Gene Kelly's constant telephone womanizing, keeping Esther out of the water and seeking Miss Turn-style for the Month of June, I would say he and Frankie Sinatra make a cute couple in Anchors Aweigh, Take Me Out To The Ball Game and On The Town.

 

Then there's Frankie and Monty in From Here To Eternity. Ernest Borgnine is fuming with jealousy over that bro-mance and has to go the masochistic route with Frankie. Not even Donna Reed can keep Monty distracted.

 

... and Frankie definitely spends more time with Lawrence Harvey than he does Janet Leigh in The Manchurian Candidate.

 

Don't get me started on all of the brotherly love in the Rat Pack movies. This all makes me question what the big deal was with The Detective.

 

In Disney animated features, I often consider Trusty and Jock in Lady and the Tramp as an elderly "married couple" who give guidance, but no doggie desires, towards Lady and are very protective of her when Tramp is around. "Yoooouuuu mongrel!". Jock wails in loneliness when he thinks Trusty is killed. They are more expressively affectionate with each other than Jaq and Gus the mice in Cinderella and the three good lesbians in Sleeping Beauty. (Maleficent is also a lesbian, but she has no lover. That is why she is so full of rage and desperately trying to keep Prince Philip away from the teenage star, locking him in chains.)

 

Here the two do decide to get "engaged" to Lady though.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh-kay. I guess I am not responding to this thread correctly. I am not sure where to draw the line regarding "bromances" and cartoon doggie buddyships...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh-kay. I guess I am not responding to this thread correctly. I am not sure where to draw the line regarding "bromances" and cartoon doggie buddyships...

Don't worry. You are responding just fine. If you have more examples, keep responding. I like all the examples I've seen so far.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alan Alda with either Wayne Rogers or Mike Farrell: M*A*S*H. The first three seasons of M*A*S*H were memorable, and part of the reason was Alda's chemistry with Rogers. After Rogers left (and before Alda became a prima donna), Alda still had chemistry with Farrell, but a different kind. Rogers, Farrell, and Larry Linville are my favorite actors on the show, so...

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always felt that James Stewart and Arthur O'Connell had great chemistry in Anatomy of a Murder​. O'Connell played an older mentor figure to Stewart whose dependence on alcohol has made him self-doubting and unambitious. Stewart walks a fine line between being an enabler and an interventionist and his studied unconcern when dealing with O'Connell lets us see how deeply he actually is​ concerned about the welfare of the older man. Stewart sees that an opportunity for himself (a big murder case) would also be an opportunity for O'Connell to turn his life around, so he enlists his help with the proviso that he be sober throughout the process. Stewart actually becomes the mentor, without ever taking any credit for it. It's a beautifully drawn relationship and it's a big part of what makes me return to the film again and again.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always felt that James Stewart and Arthur O'Connell had great chemistry in Anatomy of a Murder​. O'Connell played an older mentor figure to Stewart whose dependence on alcohol has made him self-doubting and unambitious. Stewart walks a fine line between being an enabler and an interventionist and his studied unconcern when dealing with O'Connell lets us see how deeply he actually is​ concerned about the welfare of the older man. Stewart sees that an opportunity for himself (a big murder case) would also be an opportunity for O'Connell to turn his life around, so he enlists his help with the proviso that he be sober throughout the process. Stewart actually becomes the mentor, without ever taking any credit for it. It's a beautifully drawn relationship and it's a big part of what makes me return to the film again and again.

Arthur O'Connell also had great chemistry with Don Murray in "Bus Stop".

 

When he leaves Don Murray at the end - to his own devices and Marilyn Monroe - it is a genuinely sad exit.

 

Because Murray - without O'Connell and with Monroe - is not a promising prospect. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us