Dr. Rich Edwards

Daily Dose #3: Fighting For Her (Scene from The Ring)

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The dancers moving faster with the rhythm of the phono player draws the other guest and viewing audience I at the same time. Love when their bodies fade into the piano keys. The use of the mirror reflection,and how the viewer is drawn into what Jack is imagining, had me believing that was truly going on. The wife gets so close when speaking and the kiss suckered me in. Jack and the wife both see different, but the same reflections in the mirror and have their own fantasies of what they see.

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The Ring is certainly not your typical Hitchcock film, yet his flirting with German expressionist ideas and the importance of montage and film editing dominates the film, and it continued to influence his way of filmmaking throughout his career.

 

Rapid cuts, very different from one another and somewhat disturbing to the audience, are used again by Hitch to create a subjective atmosphere. Also contributing are some distorting stills that resemble a painting rather than a film scene, and the constant change of pace from fast to slow and vice versa.

 

Hitchcock uses this disturbing effect to make us identify with the main character, a boxer who's afraid he'll lose his wife to the champion, and comes to believe that the way to win her is to become the champion himself. A couple of close-ups to his face and his expressions emphasize this jealousy and ambition that has overcome him and, combined with the fast-paced but disturbing dance sequence are used to make us be closer to one character rather than objective viewers.

 

Hitchcock sets the stage perfectly to emphasize the rivalry between the two boxers, who are ready to fight not only for the championship but for a woman as well. Throughout this whole sequence we are watching them willing to escalate this rivalry and ready to take action against each other.

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This scene of The Ring is magnificent. The contrast between the happy situation of dance (seen through a mirror) - and remember that, from Expressionism onwards, and then also in the film noir, that what we see in the mirror is not reality but a vision that can be subjective or distorted it - and the gloomy thoughts of the character accentuated the tension and added the theme of jealousy to the rivalry between the two boxers. The incidental music also reflects this. Finally, and by overlapping scenes mounting, the nightmare trumps reality. Distorted, rotating, disk images musical instruments charged presence, created an in visual and emotional crescendo of high dramatic content.

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Probably a coincidence, but the boxer's manager, at 4:15 in THE RING clip, points to the boxing poster in the exact same way that Raymond Burr's character, Lars Thorwald did in REAR WINDOW. When the police arrive at Thorwald's apartment while Lisa Fremont is in his stealing the late wife's wedding ring, he points to her standing behind him while facing the cops.

It's an awkward gesture on both occasions.

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While I think everyone is doing an admirable job answering the questions, I think it leading us off into the weeds, and we're missing the point of the scene. Also in it's kind of hard to take a scene out of context. We have two rooms, one where the boxer is talking to his manager and another room where the boxer's wife and others are. What we see in the boxer's room is real, but virtually everything that we see in the other room is happening in the boxer's imagination. Let me explain by just looking at the room where the wife is. The wife is sitting next to another man, sitting very close to him. They seem to be smitten with each other. Someone is playing jazzy ragtime piano, and women are dancing the Charleston. As the scene progresses, the  dancing becomes more feverish, and the passion between the boxer's wife and the other man intensifies. The women become so overheated that the men need to fan them to cool them off and pour champagne in their mouths. Between the man and the boxer's wife, he asks her out; she has her hand on his shoulder, they hold hands.

 

At a certain point, we see that what the boxer sees is not reality, but what is going on in his own head. He is no longer seeing his wife and the other man in the mirror (reality) but everywhere he looks. The dancers and keyboard become distorted and superimposed with other instruments and a record player in a nightmarish way. Even the music changes from lively and jazzy to nightmarish. Ultimately, he sees his wife kissing the other man. And that shakes the boxer up up so much that he bursts into the other room.

 

I am absolutely the worst at reading lips, but I can pick up the emotion. Clearly, something is wrong/improper. Then we see the other room as it really is. The people in the other room look at the boxer like he's crazy. No one is dancing. There is no champagne, We don't even see a piano or other instruments. The boxer's wife is sitting with the other man, but they are not kissing, holding hand's. She is not sitting in his lap. I'm interpreting this to mean that almost nothing of what we saw happening was real. It was almost all in the boxer's head. How do I know this? After they look at him like he's crazy, the boxer is apologetic and contrite. He was in the wrong and let had let his imagination run away with him. 

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2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

 

In the Expressionist tradition, Hitch uses superimpositions and dissolves in the editing, and zooms, changes in focus, and image distortion in the cinematography to show the boxer’s growing suspicion, concern, and anger over what could be going on in the next room with his wife and his rival.  A shot representing the boxer’s imagination of his wife and his rival is superimposed over a pov shot panning from the mirror to the boxer’s manager.  As his imagination of the worst grows, the shot of the rival and his wife is zoomed in, and ultimately becomes the only shot on screen, the shot of his manager--and reality--fading out.  This shot then dissolves into a dizzying blur of warped, elongated, in-and-out-of-focus images of dancers, musical instruments, and a record player superimposed over one another, ultimately culminating in a shot of the boxer’s worst fear—his wife kissing the rival—superimposed over those shots, which then dissolves into a close-up of the boxer’s exasperated face.  All of this technical manipulation serves to put us literally into the boxer’s state of mind.

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The frenzy of the dancers made everyone forget their more responsible selves. Even the lights in the cityscape were blinking on and off, adding to the unsettled feeling of this group. Anything goes. Everyone seems to be egging the dancers on to more craziness.

The promoter tries to get the fighter to think of his upcoming fight but all he can see is his wife sitting on his competitors lap being a little too cozy. (How did that start anyway)? But then he's told he can leave his wife there while he trains and he knows that is a risky idea. 

When the promoter said "I thought you said you'd fight for her" I could take that two ways. He could go to the fight and fight "for" her as a way to show he's trying to better their lives. Or he could literally be fighting "FOR" her by keeping her away from his competitor.

Everything seems unreal as the fighter projects his thoughts onto the group of what he thinks will happen and then realizing he went off the deep end a bit tries to calm it down. The promotor tries to get him to fight as a way to keep his wife (which seems important to him). Why didn't he go get her off that guy's lap and have a little talk? 

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Why did people get so dressed up in the olden days? I liked the superimposed images. I guess it was the only way to get your point across back then. It would seem heavy-handed nowadays. It might even be considered a little hammy. Hitchcock certainly liked his cinematic tricks. The medium was new. You could try anything and the audience would dig it. Did Chaplin resort to this kind of stuff? 

I could see a huge step up in the film quality. Or, the print was better, not sure which.  

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1. Montage allows us to feel the pace at which life (outside of the ring) is passing by our boxer. Dancers are coming and going; men and women are close...sitting on laps, draped across the sofa...it's all about pleasure that is seemingly one room away. Without montage you could not get a sense of vitality as it hits all aspects of free time, careless relationships and pleasure. He wants to be a part of the scene but like many other Hitch films, he's a voyeur who wants to step into the scene.

 

2. German expressionism - the camera angles, quick cuts, and close ups that cut back to the ogling eyes of the fighter give us a glimpse into what he is feeling. The fact that he is in a different room...so close and yet so far away gives his staring at his wife so much intensity. The ghost-like sequence with his wife and another man floats into the scene and won't go away. It's an inner fear, reinforced by what he sees in a glimpse into another room that causes his inner thoughts to float into his consciousness and move around the scene. Setting the frenetic pace in one room plays off well against the quite, removed room the fighter is sitting in.

 

3. Staging - the scenes between his rival and his wife are mostly close, intense and playful but there is the one part where she looks worried and pensive as she spies her husband in another room. The ghostlike image of his rival and his wife floating into his room is a image he can do nothing about. Is it real or imagined? The trainer and associate pointing at the poster try to root his feet into the real purpose but his contrite remarks only make him feel less of a champ. Maybe he knows that becoming champ might not bring his lips as close as his rivals.

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2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

 

In the Expressionist tradition, Hitch uses superimpositions and dissolves in the editing, and zooms, changes in focus, and image distortion in the cinematography to show the boxer’s growing suspicion, concern, and anger over what could be going on in the next room with his wife and his rival.  A shot representing the boxer’s imagination of his wife and his rival is superimposed over a pov shot panning from the mirror to the boxer’s manager.  As his imagination of the worst grows, the shot of the rival and his wife is zoomed in, and ultimately becomes the only shot on screen, the shot of his manager--and reality--fading out.  This shot then dissolves into a dizzying blur of warped, elongated, in-and-out-of-focus images of dancers, musical instruments, and a record player superimposed over one another, ultimately culminating in a shot of the boxer’s worst fear—his wife kissing the rival—superimposed over those shots, which then dissolves into a close-up of the boxer’s exasperated face.  All of this technical manipulation serves to put us literally into the boxer’s state of mind.

 

You mentioned "dizzying blur of warped, elongated, in-and-out-of-focus images" and I believe these are to illustrate the boxers growing fear but also cement in the viewer's eyes that this is a distorted view in the boxer's mind. Hitchcock wanted, whenever he could to put you in the character's mindset to vest you in his vision.

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1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 

Hitchcock uses a variety of shots to show the action and the thoughts of the characters. He alternates between long shots of the party and the two female dancers, medium shots of other partygoers, and close-ups of the wife at the party and her husband in the adjoining room.

2. As is the case with a lot of German expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

Hitchcock uses the mirror to show that the husband and the wife are each aware of the other’s presence. The wife seems a bit displeased when she catches sight of her husband in the mirror. The overlapping shots of the hands playing instruments and the phonograph record, combined with the overlapping shot of the wife leaning in closer and closer to the other man, show viewers what the husband is thinking and that he is imagining the worst about his wife.

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, and use set design and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?

It seems to me that the stakes are highest for the husband. He is all too aware of his wife partying in the next room. The champion, the man partying with his wife, doesn’t seem to know that the husband exists at all! Hitchcock only lets us know, with an intertitle, that the champion wants to take the wife out again. The rest of the subjective shots (see number 2 above) all show mostly the husband’s frame of mind.

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Why did people get so dressed up in the olden days? I liked the superimposed images. I guess it was the only way to get your point across back then. It would seem heavy-handed nowadays. It might even be considered a little hammy. Hitchcock certainly liked his cinematic tricks. The medium was new. You could try anything and the audience would dig it. Did Chaplin resort to this kind of stuff? 

I could see a huge step up in the film quality. Or, the print was better, not sure which.  

 

Why did people get so dressed up in the "olden Days?" This continued through the 60's as my father wore a tie at our dinner table every night. People dressed up to go to parties and even air travel. You rarely would see someone on an airplane who was not in their best clothes. I love the casual environment we live in but in some ways I admire the respect shown for daily events in those "olden days"

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Hitchcock did a number of montage sequences within this clip to add to the vibrant dancers and partygoers’ over the top actions of drinking, dancing and flirtatious moves all around the room.  In stark contrast to the well-dressed boxer in the next room contemplating his upcoming bout while worrying about his wife’s fidelity.  We are not sure if he is actually seeing his wife becoming intimately close to his rival in the next room or the image of them superimposed over a shot of him is just his imagination getting the best of him.  Either way the montage fuels the thought of reckless abandon of the wild crowd partying in the next room and ignites this character’s insecurities.

 

Though the main character is seated and quite reserved in a room adjacent to the party and is not directly involved, Hitchcock’s subjective montage containing hands playing the piano, the record player and other musical instruments all superimposed together in a powerful image indicating that this man is being besieged with the sounds of music and decadence within the next room.

 

For set design and staging, starting with the room where the party is happening, full of people drinking and dancing and going wild is conveniently next to a more reserved parlor where the boxing managers are prepping their man for his next fight.  Well-placed mirrors allows for the boxer and his wife to catch glimpses of each other from the different rooms. The rivalry is spurred on by the manager’s total lack of concern for the main character and tell him he wouldn’t be in this position (of losing his wife) if he were a champion.  Once again the music punctuates the action on the screen with upbeat tempos for the party scenes and slow melancholy moods for the boxer character’s scenes.         

 

Additionally, I would suggest that the manner in which the interaction takes place between the manager and the boxer gives the impression that the manager may be creating tension to fuel the boxer's anger and drive to win.

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I was just watching the new Twin Peaks on tv this week, and there was a lot of iconic David Lynch-esque surrealism in the episode. I loved it. In this bit of The Ring, I felt Hitchcock was using the montage or expressive editing to enhance the viewer's understanding of what the boxer was going through. Maybe booze was going to his head. Maybe his lady love's flirting with another man was causing him confusion and even pain, affecting his mental state. It was a very effective technique, I think. Hitchcock wasn't afraid to try new things here and throughout his career.

Me too Helensgirl! All I can say is you've got good taste! May I recommend Sharon Van Etten's "Are We There" particularly her song "Tarifa" thumbs way up! Also, the music is in fact the necessary pleasure for blind people who cannot see what everyone is raving about in terms of Hitchcock's genius... the genius came later when he married all the senses. Silent pictures had their limitations.

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So, a Hitchcock signature scene - showing the film making art of German Expressionism. A theme of fatalism is suggested as the fighter laments over not taking his wife with him to training camp - but only after the frantic energy of the dance party. Several shots of the fighter viewing the action in the mirror seem to get amplified in his mind - Hitchcock "shows" us the increasingly distorted emotions through his mind's eye - the stretched piano keys, turn turning record, strumming fingers. It's certain that we're seeing his emotional state change and deform when those images are superimposed again over the trainers talking.

The lecture notes and video really provided me with new knowledge to even take a stab at writing about or "analyzing" Hitchcock! #practice #moremore 

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While I think everyone is doing an admirable job answering the questions, I think it leading us off into the weeds, and we're missing the point of the scene. Also in it's kind of hard to take a scene out of context. We have two rooms, one where the boxer is talking to his manager and another room where the boxer's wife and others are. What we see in the boxer's room is real, but virtually everything that we see in the other room is happening in the boxer's imagination. Let me explain by just looking at the room where the wife is. The wife is sitting next to another man, sitting very close to him. They seem to be smitten with each other. Someone is playing jazzy ragtime piano, and women are dancing the Charleston. As the scene progresses, the  dancing becomes more feverish, and the passion between the boxer's wife and the other man intensifies. The women become so overheated that the men need to fan them to cool them off and pour champagne in their mouths. Between the man and the boxer's wife, he asks her out; she has her hand on his shoulder, they hold hands.

 

At a certain point, we see that what the boxer sees is not reality, but what is going on in his own head. He is no longer seeing his wife and the other man in the mirror (reality) but everywhere he looks. The dancers and keyboard become distorted and superimposed with other instruments and a record player in a nightmarish way. Even the music changes from lively and jazzy to nightmarish. Ultimately, he sees his wife kissing the other man. And that shakes the boxer up up so much that he bursts into the other room.

 

I am absolutely the worst at reading lips, but I can pick up the emotion. Clearly, something is wrong/improper. Then we see the other room as it really is. The people in the other room look at the boxer like he's crazy. No one is dancing. There is no champagne, We don't even see a piano or other instruments. The boxer's wife is sitting with the other man, but they are not kissing, holding hand's. She is not sitting in his lap. I'm interpreting this to mean that almost nothing of what we saw happening was real. It was almost all in the boxer's head. How do I know this? After they look at him like he's crazy, the boxer is apologetic and contrite. He was in the wrong and let had let his imagination run away with him. 

Hmm, I see what you mean that the boxer is seeing "more" than what's actually happening (the frenzied dancing just dancing, champagne in glasses rather than being guzzled from the bottles...) But I thought they could see each other from the way the hall mirror was positioned... Context is everything - I cant wait to see The Ring next week :) 

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Hitchcock uses montage and expressive expression by using the mirror scene.

The main character and his wife glance at one another. Also, Hithcock super imposes the image of the flirting with the other gentleman and the reaction of

the other men.

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I found the use of the mirrors by the boxer & his wife very interesting.  The reflections each sees seems to be distorted.  What each seems to be seeing is distorted by their own insecurities & fears.

 

The wife doesn't seem very comfortable with all of the frantic action in the room she's in, & her interaction with the "champ" seems forced, not sincere.  It's almost as if she's forcing herself to show interest in him, even though it's doubtful that's what she's feeling.  Maybe she's trying to force some kind of emotion or action from her husband?  Maybe she's afraid that with his continued success, she's going to lose her husband?

 

And her husband, observing his wife, he misinterprets her behavior because of his own fears of losing her.  He thinks that she's truly interested in the champ.

 

 

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Hitchcock used montage to create a frantic mood. The utilization of the montage bombards the viewer with a series of surreal and expressive images. It gives the audience a glimpse into the fears and emotions of the boxer.

 

The director employs a variety of distorted images including the keyboard, mirror, the superimposed phonograph, etc. to heighten the feeling of tension and fear of the main character.

 

The stark contrast of the party room and the room with the boxer provides a contrast between the two characters. Having the two protagonists in separate rooms that are linked with a mirror, perhaps suggests that, while very different, the two characters are linked by fate.

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1. Hitchcock used fast action in the beginning of scene where the women were dancing, alcohol was being quickly downed, and the boxer's wife was getting closer to the champion, to show that the party was full of life. It reminded me of the carefree attitudes of the flappers during the era, effectively mirroring the social mood. Vitality was also seen in the later images where the husband was experiencing doubt about his wife's loyalties with the instruments superimposed on each other.

 

2. Superimposed images and montages show what the husband is feeling about his wife's attraction to the champion. The montage of instruments and the record-player helped to show the confusion and worry that the main character was experiencing, giving us a look into his mind. 

 

3. The one thing that stands out to me to show a competition is the use of a mirror scene. I thought that this was framed brilliantly, because it was a new and exciting way to set up the story and to create a sense of competition between the two boxers. And as others also mentioned, the manager seemed to allow this insecurity and competition to blossom to help aid the boxer in victory against the champion. 

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Why did people get so dressed up in the "olden Days?" This continued through the 60's as my father wore a tie at our dinner table every night. People dressed up to go to parties and even air travel. You rarely would see someone on an airplane who was not in their best clothes. I love the casual environment we live in but in some ways I admire the respect shown for daily events in those "olden days"

yeah, take a look at photos of fans at baseball games in those days, most men in suit and tie!

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1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 
 
The montage was pretty powerful. I think it showed the audience all the hectic things going through Jack's mind is a unique way. Frantic/energetic dancing, booze flowing, lap sitting, piano playing and trying to have a business conversation with his manager. All those things going on at the same time through the montage added to the rhythm and intensified the scene. 
 
2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 
 
Utilizing the mirror to look into the party as well as into the room where Jack was gives the impression that we are seeing a reflection of things perhaps not quite as they are in reality. Jack's girlfriend is sitting on Bob's lap (which is kind of odd given her boyfriend is in the other room) even though she looks a bit uncomfortable. It's still a bit intimate however nothing has truly happened (yet).  
 
3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  
 
The sequence where we see the faint "ghost like" image of Jack's girlfriend and Bob together suggests that we are seeing inside Jack's mind. An indicator that he thinks more is going on that probably is at the time. He's jealous, tired, probably tipsy and knows that his girlfriend is talking to "The Champ". Even his manager keeps tugging at that string telling him she wants a champion and that he needs to fight for her if he wants to keep her. 
 
*Additional reflections
 
A few things that stood out to me from the lesson today.
 
  • One of Hitchcock's best "touches" was his creativity in silent film scenes. Finding new angles, utilizing shadows, color, swaying chandeliers and even a glass ceiling. That also carried into his later films with sound. He still utilized the powerful impact of the visuals to tell the story and not necessarily words. Feature film scripts are generally 120 pages long. I wonder if his scripts were whittled down a lot.  Hitch did say that filmmakers forgot how to make films when talkies came around. That's really interesting to think about. 
 
  • A random thought I had was wondering how Hitch might have shot the ending scene of Psycho as a silent film. How would he had conveyed the voice of “Mother” in Norman's mind as he doesn’t swat that fly? Perhaps on a title card, but I don’t know if they ever added things such asThinking in his head as he hears Mother’s voice: 'Let them see what kind of a person I am. I'm not even going to swat that fly.'”
 
  • I thought it was interesting that script writing was seen as a "woman's job" at the time.
 
  • Being in the movie industry myself producing and writing mostly indie films, the topic of the director being an auteur (or author) of a film has come up a few times in my circle. I've always thought directors like Hitchcock , John Carpenter, Fincher and Spielberg were true auteur's. Those directors are known for their "touch" and have their hands in a lot of aspects of the films. Even though there are thousands of people who contribute to making these films great, there's still that central part of the nexus that stands out.

    However, I also think that a producer can be the auteur. I've known directors who just show up on set and don't really seem to bring that auteur quality. A lot of times that shows in the final product as well. So, I do think that there are certainly auteur directors but not all directors are auteur's.
 
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Hitch's German Expressionist influence is felt strongly in this scene. The moment that sticks out in my head (no pun intended) as the most prominent is the superimposition of the spinning record player over the protagonist's forehead, indicating the flurry of rage whirling around in his head as he witnesses his wife's supposed infatuation with his opponent. Also, the distorted/elongated images of the dancers and piano keys demonstrate a dream-like state in which the protagonist envisions his wife cheating on him--something he can't stop thinking about, even while the manager is speaking to him (the image of the wife and opponent superimposed on the shot of the manager speaking). This further helps to heighten the stakes between the two men--it's not just a boxing match they have on their hands; it's a personal struggle with a love on the line.

 

The relatively quick cuts during the dance sequence help to convey a frenetic pace, which mirrors the movement and light debauchery taking place in the room.

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1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 

I feel the expressive editing adds a lot of emotional expression to the story. We see a man who is watching his wife with another man. The elongation of the piano player and notes is nightmarish and adding anxiety and tension. Everyone is having fun but the boxer who is being pressured to leave his wife to train, his wife who seems to be ready to have an affair.

 

 

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

The curvature and elongation of the musician reminds me of Munch's The Scream. The dancing and fast paced party, champagne being poured into mouths , the dancing and carrying on while in another room the opposite is happening. A man is being tortured by what he sees and his being pressured to be apart of the fun and to protect what is his. The look on the boxer.s face watching his wife is reminiscent of Heckel's Portrait of a Man woodcut such despair and sadness.

 

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen? 

The two men are separated by rooms, the wife is watching her husband through a mirror in the other room. She doesn't seem happy but is accepting the advancements of the other man. Is she trying to make her husband jealous? The action and nightmarish cinematography is making the husband lose his mind and worry about losing his wife. The party and office are opposites and adds tension to the viewer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I love the way Hitchcock used so many elements to build up the intensity of the jealousy brewing in the husband's mind about his wife with the champion boxer.  It starts with just some minor revelry -- falling into laps, a few energetic female dancers and then within seconds the scene speeds up -- more revelers partake, the dancing is faster (as is the music, but I'm not really including the music as it could be different depending on where you were watching a film), the cuts are shorter.  Then he starts using montage as distortion -- from the keys to the generally blurred scene, and finally we see the champion and his wife superimposed over the conversation with his manager.  My stomach was getting in knots as this short scene progressed.  

 

Most of the scene is subjective -- in fact, you don't really know that it's subjective for sure until the lead character bursts into the other room and sees nothing of what he was "seeing" from afar.  Hitchcock used short cuts, montage, distortion, superimposition and worked mirrors into the buildup of the tension -- all of these are evident in German expressionist films of that era.

 

As far as set design goes, we see the tranquil "parlor" or office -- stark with a poster on the wall -- as a very businesslike, staid setting juxtaposed with the party atmosphere of the living room with the picture window and the fluffy sofas and piano -- all items that just scream "relax" and "let loose."  There are also more wide shots in the party scene, whereas the room with the boxer and his manager is more cropped, with medium close ups and two shots -- a narrower viewpoint, with the manager focused on a single item -- getting this guy to be a champion.

 

 

 

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