Dr. Rich Edwards

Daily Dose #3: Fighting For Her (Scene from The Ring)

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1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? The effect visually pulls the audience in to assume the emotions and actions of the character. 

2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling? The technique also emotionally pulls the audience in and adds to the tension. The way the female walked towards the two men, in a slow, deliberate way, really emphasized the drama and tension I think Htichcock was trying to portray. It's an additional element and layer to make the story and conflict more intense. 

3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure GardenThe Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples. One that stood out to me was the close up of the female's face, similar to the closeup of the screaming woman in "The Lodger."

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     Hitchcock use of montage for The Ring brings a subjective view to enhance the emotional state of the husband and wife. Hitchcock uses a mirror as the portal for the characters to project their emotions, which appears to feed into their insecurities. The wife sees her husband as not interested in her while she is in the other room, even though she is sitting the arm of the chair of a another man. The husband sees his wife sitting closely to another man. The image of his wife and the other man is a superimposed projection while he attempts to focus on the conversation with the men who want to discuss the upcoming fight. During this series of shots, Hitchcock edits in montage shots of distorted images of the key board of the piano and the dancing party members. This distortion seems to reflect the distorted images he watches while the space dissolves between his wife and the man’s faces as they kiss.  His obsession of what he images he sees later proves to be false as he rushes into the room with the dancers to confront them. They are not kissing and the dancers look at him with shock. He then closes the door so he cannot see the reflection from the mirror, but his conversation with the men about the upcoming fight focuses on his insecurity to leave his wife alone while he begins training. Hitchcock’s use of montage invites the audience to view the events within the context of the emotional state of the character. As the audience begins to understand the characters emotional state, then they may anticipate the tension as it builds between the characters. 

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Hitchcock uses montage to add vitality and rhythm to this scene by cutting the happy fighter talking about fighting with clips of his wife in another room sitting near his rival. He watches them through a mirror which is an interesting shot. The dancing almost turns into a frenzy, and now the boxer's imagination starts to run wild along with the increasing dancing. He inner thoughts shape an imaginary scene between his wife and the other fighter and intensify with the dancing and music.

 

As with German Expressionism, the fighters inner thoughts and emotions are emphasized. The dark theme of jealousy that is getting out of control. The out of control wild dancing and music makes his imagination also go out of control. He runs into the room and brings it to a halt. 

 

The set design stages the action in the two rooms, one is the fighters reality while through the mirror he sees his wife and it becomes a crazy scene in his mind. They are separate, one discussing fighting and the other in a room of wild dancing with loud music and sitting too close to the champion he wants to be. The mirror view and the fever pitch of the other room turn his thoughts into wild visions followed by rage. Then he is reminded he must fight to be the champion his wife seems to be admiring.   

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1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 

 

The scene unfolds as one gent is sitting in another room observing through the mirror the action in the living room. His wife with his possible rival engaging what seems to be a flirtation. As it goes back and forth from room to room, we see the juxtaposition of the two narratives expressed in the brilliant editing. Though we see two different settings. It is open to interpretation to the audience. Hitchcock and his wife, Alma, were so brilliant in use of editing to tell a story or enhance it.

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

The frenzy dancing showing the back of the party goers as it get distorted. The dark side of human emotions began to emerge. The elongated piano keys is the hallmark of losing reality to your delusional thoughts. As the fighter watches the scene through the mirror, much like Alice in Wonderland, he too step into the mirrored world; the distortion of reality is becoming real as his imagination take over. He imagines an illicit kiss that may or may happened between the wife and rival thus he screamed out and shock the reality of the room of party revelers and then return back from the dark emotional journey to his own reality of planning a fight.

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  

Hitch staged the scene with such mastery stroke of his hand with a room full of party goers in a posh London flat. We see the merry gathering. Yet Hitch begins to take us on a journey with the interweaving of montages through editing to tell the story of the room. Editing is superb in that in goes back and forth from fighter to rival to tell a story of rivalry that perhaps started long before he was married. I can impose my voyeuristic view by thinking that the wife had known the rival and the husband knew it or simply we see a bored wife who is left alone on too many nights is starting to take flight.
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1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? Like most of the respondents here, I find the use of the mirror in cuts from one room to the other intriguing, almost as a device for the character as viewer to 'see through' as well as a device for reflection.  Hitchcock initially shows only a partial view of the party beginning, with just enough information to suggest the proceedings, and cuts to show the entire more elaborate set, perhaps as the viewing character imagines it?  The tempo of the music and editing back and forth from medium close to full set shots adds to frenetic pace of the scene.

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. I love the surrealist feel of the dancers fading into the elongated keys and the mad spinning of the disk.  For some reason, reminds me a bit of the Salvador Dali-designed dream sequence in Spellbound.

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  The stark differences between the party set, which is full of people, more elaborate and frenetic, collide with the more serious set, which is more sparsely furnished and bare, seeming to add to the dissonance and anxiety of the main character.  

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Expressive editing adds an element of chaos to this scene from The Ring​. Without the intercuts of the record player, the piano player, the exaggerated visions of the piano keys and dancers, we would be left with scenes from a party....with little comment on the feelings of the man in the other room. Perhaps we would have some shots of a squinted eye and dark grimace, but  we would not feel his spiral into frenzied jealousy.

 

I would say there is no subjective shot quite like that through a mirror. The mirror gives the boxer an a view of the party and his rival, but it also gives the viewer a portal into the boxer's mind. We enter the boxer's wild imagination through the mirror and we exit through the mirror into the reality his mindset brings into being, a fight for his marriage against the man he imagines can take her away.

 

The intercuts during this scene are gradual at first, and speed up as the mental stakes of the hoboxer in the other room get higher and higher. A foreshadowing of the frenzied action to come comes in the form of two professional dancers, wildly performing the Charleston (?). Their movements are off putting at first in the middle of a room with men in tuxedos and women in eveningwear. As the action in the mind's eye of the boxer continues, the women continue to dance as his wife and his rival share a chair and conversation. We get our first cuts of the piano man, the record player. We cut to the face of the boxer as he imagines his wife in intimate conversation with his rival. The music gets more frantic. The party joins the female dancers, the cuts are faster and the images distorted. We are in the mind of a man in an anxious state of jealousy and fear. We understand his anxiety and we feel it with him.

 

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As Hitchcock did so effectively throughout his career, he intercuts subjective perspectives of characters (here, the fighter and his wife) to draw us into their thoughts.  Also, the editing of this scene overcomes the limitation of a silent film --- this is a loud and boisterous party scene there's live music from the ukulele and piano, recorded music playing on the phonograph, hearty laughter and foot-stomping dancing.  

The  subjective shots tell us that the wife sees her husband as alone and dull, in contrast the party swirls around her.  The fighter sees glimpses of his wife enjoying the party and his imagination runs wild to the point of obsession.  

Th staging of the action and the editing create the psychological tension that, in turn, propel the fighter (presumably) to make a decision or initiate an action.

 

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1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 

 

In addition to other comments regarding cuts what impressed me was something that is so obvious it doesn’t seem to be mentioned. Every frame has constant motion. Even the section where the dancers sit down from exhaustion, a partier immediately produces a bottle to, at first, help the dancer, then after she drinks continues to pour the champagne down her throat. Immediately after pushing the bottle away, the dancer is up and dancing again, joined by her partner. The partiers, although seated, are constantly applauding, stomping their feet in time to the music, the pianist banging the piano keys, a cigarette flicking up and down in his held in his mouth.

 

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

 

Visuals including elongated piano keys, record spinning super imposed over the fighters head, images of the boxer’s wife sitting on the lap of his main competitor eventually resulting in a kiss appear in a ghostly fashion. 

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  

 

The action is staged using two modes, frantic activity at the beginning and end of the film countering still scenes involving the rivalry between the two men. The movie begins with the rivals duking it out in a fight that establishes their competition. The middle of the movie concentrates the rising career of Jack ‘One Rounder’ establishing his upward climb thru the boxing rank; as opposed to the actions of his competitor ‘Bob’ winning Jack’s wife Mabel away from him. Closes with the dramatic action of the fight resolving their conflict, and the return of Jack’s wife to his “corner.” I have to say that set design and costuming were interesting, in a dated sense. Not enough to seriously impact the film, however I am not used to seeing a boxing movie in which the boxers dress in tie and tails when they’re not fighting, attending parties where those around them are dressed the same. ????

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1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene?

 

He uses a variety of shots in editing the party sequences: closeups, long shots, crisp or burred shots. The rapidity of his cutting between the wild dancers and the party goers provides the pizzazz and unrestrained revery in the room. The shot of the spinning record is an interesting choice to show the speed of the action, along with suggesting the ring in which the characters are trapped. 

 

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

The use of the mirror is a useful technique to reflect and exaggerate what Jack sees and imagines he sees. It also reminds us what the wife sees in her husband, emphasizing what she really wants.  As Jack grows more uncomfortable, he brings their images out from the mirror making them larger than life. By superimposing them in the meeting room, Hitchcock allows us to see that Jack cannot get the couple out of his mind. Though he is seeing a paranoid distortion, as paranoia often is, it actually provides the truth. Jack is beginning to come apart as he suddenly finds himself in the party and must apologize for what he believes.

Hitch also uses a distorted Dali-like technique with the piano to show another dimension of reality, which he will later use with Dali in Spellbound.

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  

 

The frenetic party with Jack’s wife sitting on the lap of his rival i.e, now also his boss, increases the tension between the pro and the amateur.  Our protagonist and antagonist are now only separated by reflection across a hallway. This short distance is also enough to provide the growing gulf between the husband and wife. She is no longer attracted by her husband’s subservient nature and finds herself drawn to power and success. The use of  the severity of the meeting room, with Jacks pacing, juxtaposed with the nonchalant attitude of the pro in the party, help demonstrate how mismatched they are in life as well as in the ring.

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1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 


Hitchcock masterfully uses montage and the opening scene. The juxtapositionOf the fire seeing his wife flirting in the mirror and then the close-up adds to the tension he is feeling. I love The expressionist and surrealist touches to express the debauchery/frenzy of the jazz age: the record player the, elongated bizarre piano keys (to me says "getting explosive/jealous..  "keyed" up), the fun house mirror effects all add drama. This is the first silent of Hitch's where I feel the expressionist ragtime piano score adds well to the drama Hitch is conveying. 


2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 


 


There are so many:


1. The juxtaposition of the woman flirting with mirror reflection and husband (the fighter) watching on.


2. The surrealist mirror and elongated focus shots of the piano that add interest, and intrigue. They seem to become deranged, explosive  (keyed up).. like the main character.  The theme of paranoia is established by Hitch's use of cinematography. Jack makes his paranoia apparent by pulling the characters out of the mirror aka making them LARGER THAN LIFE.  The Dali like piano filtration reminded me of Spellbound and Dali dream sequence from that movie.  Again we see Hitch's signature style. 


3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  


We see Jack's wife sitting on the lap of Jack's boss.  The montage/juxtaposition techniques shows the tensions between the two gents. Or protagonist and antagonist are separated by the mirror which is a good analogy to seperation of power/class as well. The wife is drawn to power. Almost thereI want 17th orThis is one night. The party scene and frivolity enhance the drama and  action

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Daily Dose #3 - The Ring 

 

1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene?

         This is an editor's dream.  The montage of the party almost seems out of control with the audience not really knowing what is going on, which is just what Hitchcock wants of them, because it is mirroring the husband/boxer at the moment.  He's in another room, where his wife is in with the wild party.  The combination of the music (in the scene, as opposed to the soundtrack), the talk from the promotors/managers/owners and the drink has the poor husband's mind reeling.  He then sees his wife with another man via the mirror and imagines that she is cheating on him.  The shortness of each take is what is driving this scene, giving the audience the rhythm.  The scene starts slow and picks up speed.

Just try imagining this sequence with the rapid cuts, it doesn't work.  It's all in the cutting.

 

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of the main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

    The use of the mirror, as it distorts reality, the overlapping images (with a slow dolly in of the wife and other man in the chair) reveals that the Husband's mind is in two different places at the moment, and it finally dissolves to just the wife, seemingly kissing the other man (which takes place just in the husband's head).  Finally, the use of images shot using fun house mirrors (notably the piano keys seemingly long and distorted) all are techniques you would find in a German Expressionist film.

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  

  Much of this I have noted above regarding editing technique.  The set design is interesting, with the use of the mirror outside the room with the husband looking out at the party in the next room, especially since this can only be done if the wall containing the mirror is angled (another German Expressionism touch!).  The main sequence is of the party, with the husband not part of the party until his imagination thinks his wife has kissed the other man, then *poof* the husband is in the other room, and essentially stops the party!  Spoilsport!  I trust this rival with show up in the ring vs. the husband at one point.

 

- Walter

 

p.s.  Notice the Title of the film is "The Ring."  But which ring does it refer to, the boxing ring or the wedding ring?

 

p.p.s.  Anyone think the wife looks like a young Betty White?

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1) the quick shots full of frenzied action build the anxiety which leads in to the equally anxious thoughts of the boxer

 

2) the quick shots and the superimposing of images (real and imagined by the boxer)

 

3) I think the physical separation of the two rivals, one in each room directly across from each other, and with the wife of the newcomer clearly on the other side

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1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 

 

The tempo of the cuts is relatively slow and steady at the beginning of the scene. In the party, though, the pace of the cuts speeds up as the activity becomes frenetic. With the fighter, though, the pace remains deliberate as he is stewing in jealousy over his assumptions.

 

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

 

The fighter views the party through a reflection. He is not seeing reality. He dwells on the advances from the champ to his wife and we see this in the superimposed image of the two and it follows him. It becomes as important as the conversation with his manager and eventually becomes more important. The images of the party become heavily distorted and the images in his mind become more surreal.

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  

 

The set design has the two rooms physically separated, connected by a hallway with mirrors at both end. The fighter is talking with his manager and his trainer with very deliberate pacing. The champ is at a party, with the fighter's wife, any many other people. The action is wild.The cuts are quick and show the energy of the scene. The champ has everything the fighter wants, including the fighter's wife.

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1. I think the montage in this scene is depicted through the mirror of his wife flirting in the other room and you can see that the jealousness in his bones is building.

 

2.  I  detect that Gernan Expressionism used in this scene includes the close-up to get a better feeling of the situation and the different camera shot showing the view from each others perspective.

 

3.  I gathered that the discussion between the two men was just the begining of things to come.. 

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The mix of superimposed images, anticipation in the form of a kiss, closeups of the lead actors eyes as he imagines his wife's misdeeds, the distortion of the dance scene, all add to the chaos or imagined chaos of what is happening. It is a fantastic scene! 


 


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​1. When Hitchcock montages the main character's wife loves sitting on the man's lap over the man who is talking to him, it adds so much vitality to the scene. It really shows you visually how all that the man sees and can think about is the two of them, and even though he is directly looking at the man talking to him, his mind's eye is totally not focus. It is also very realistic - who hasn't zoned out when pretending to pay attention to something else? Also, the way the shots keep switching from room to room adds a rhythm and intensity to the story, and shows how each is thinking about the other.

 

​2. Hitchcock creates subjectivity by placing the camera in the point of view of the main character, as in the montage scene, and showing the thoughts that go through the stressed mind of the character. The chaotic and surreal piano shows how his mind is frustrated and creating scenarios in his head about his wife's relationship with the other man that he does not like. We also see the wife's point of view a couple times, when she looks in the mirror at him, apprehensive.

 

​3. The way in which the mirror is positioned in between the two rooms is ingenious. It allows the man and his wife to see each other without being obvious, or a part of the room. It is a casual way to 'spy' on the other person without seeming intentionally covert. This increases the rivalry because they are out in the open, but he can still see them, and wonder what might happen if he does not win her over.

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1.  Hitchcock uses montage and expressive editing to go from the man being calm and collected to losing his temper in a warped and almost drug-like state even though he does not seem to be drinking.  The mix of dancers, musicians and their hands and musical instruments, and the wife with the other man all merge into a dream-like mush.  We are calm then crazy then calm again.  Reason to insanity to calm.  

2.  I felt like I went from a rational world to a drugged atmosphere of insanity or at the very least of confusion and then got snapped back to reality.  I was not sure what was real and what was not real.  I feel that I am only repeating myself by saying that the shots go from the man sitting and talking to his noticing his wife with the other man and then all the dancers, musicians and drinking.  Everything is finally merged together until the man snaps.  I felt that this was more than anxiety.  At the end the man is able to listen to reason and calm down, but I felt like why would he want to stay with his wife if she is fooling around.  

3.  Hitchcock uses the calmness of the room with the boxer and his entourage and the partying going on in the next room to show the increasing anxiety and frustration of the married man.  His life is in flux and he is working his way up the ladder so to speak.  The other man is in more of a power of position and his wife is attracted to that.  She also seems less serious or she would be helping her husband.  The use of the mirror made me think of a dream or a portal into the other realm of being.  We initially go back and forth in a  calm manner but it quickly escelates into a frenzy.  Then we are suddenly brought back to a more calm state when the boxer snaps and calms down.  

 

I know I need to learn a lot about camera angles, editing, etc.  so I apologize.  For now I am just trying to relate what I can.  Everyone is kind - thanks!

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Flapping flag-sized handkerchiefs, a spinning phonograph record, frenetic dancers whose upraised arms morph into an anthropomorphic keyboard accompanied by discordant piano music move the scene in a jarring fashion.  Hitchcock’s montage in this scene from The Ring is disturbingly alive.

Hitchcock uses doorframes and mirrors to control the audience’s and the young boxer’s points of view of the wife’s behavior.  A further example of this subjectivity is the carousel movement that brings the wife and the gentleman, on whose armchair she perches, into the same plane as the promoter and the trainer.  They are very much in the room, embracing and kissing, but only in the young fighter’s eye and mind.  We know exactly how he thinks and feels.

The action moves between the debauchery of the party-goers in the fancy clothes and the starkness of the room where the trainer and promoter talk to the young fighter, the fight bill behind them on the fireplace wall.  The young wife and fighter see each other in the reflection of the mirror.  Hitchcock deliberately removes them from their immediate environments through their physical actions.  Their faces fall, their eyes turn to the mirror, and their smiles disappear.  Trouble in paradise.  A very ordinary love triangle set in a very disturbing world of distorted perspectives.

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high waist intrigued by have the superimposed image of the couple in the mirror grew larger as the boxers anxiety increased. I also like the Distortion of the piano keys. A surreal effect that matched the young boxers angst.

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Using the motion of the dancers and the other party goers movements gives rhythm and increases the action.  The spinning record with the elongated piano keys and revelers and the discordant music indicates how the fighter's jealousy has begun to consume his thoughts.  He imagines his wife and the other man sitting closer together, growing larger (domination of jealous thoughts)  and eventually 'sees' them kissing.  The mirror allows them both to view each other and shows how their thinking evolves.

The differences between the quiet room with his manager? discussing training and the loud party in the other room where his wife is, leaves the fighter in a psychological dilemma for the stakes not just of a fight for money and prestige, but for his wife.

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1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene?

The flappers create the rhythm with their high energy Charleston dancing. The vitality is shown through the guests' having a grand time, the drinking, the excess, etc.

 

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

The use of doorways and mirrors. This puts us in the place of the fighter as we see through his eyes. The distance from the revelry creates the feeling of isolation and not belonging.

The distorted piano keys represents the fighter's warped sense of reality. His thoughts are superimposed over the mirror, which represents the reality of the situation. This is also interspersed with the revelry and the music's speed. This highlights the anxiety for the fighter.

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  

Hitchcock creates separation from the fighter and his wife by placing them in opposing rooms. At the beginning of the scene, we see the couple framed in the door way, which is disrupted by the dancing flappers. Then it switches to the couple being framed in the mirror, and this is also we see. No other reflections. At that point, the mirror is the only connection of the two gentleman and their not yet established rivalry.

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1. Not only is there a lot of movement within each shot, from the actors particularly, but the shots also change in rapid succession, moving the point of view of the audience around the scene.

 

2. By distorting certain visual elements, like the keys and the dancers, Hitchcock shows us how the mind of the protagonist is essentially getting 'bent out of shape.' I love the use of the dancers as a mini boxing match - when they get exhausted and fall into their separate corners to be fanned, then pushed back into the centre of the floor, not to fight, but to dance.

 

3. The use of overlay, with the image of the musical instruments over the protagonists head as he gets upset, shows how the sound is making him crazy.

 

*SIDE NOTE: I'm not a huge fan of the music used here. It's only piano when clearly other instruments can be seen - which is fine, but it's best if the piano tries to imitate or give an impression of the other instruments, which isn't done here. Also, the music slows down just as they show the musicians going faster and the protagonist getting more worked up - this works against the Hitchcock thrust of the whole scene.

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1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene?

Scenes going from room to room, only connected by a hall/mirror.  Frenzied music while living people are engaging intensely in the moment.  Music eventually changing to something darker during the dream/hallucination/fore shadowing scene

 

 

2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 

 

I think the subjectivity is the mirror.  Is he really seeing the reflection from the living room or is insecurity getting the better of him and the reflections are his mind glimpsing into the future?

 

3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  

A montage of a vivid imagination seeing temptations that could leave his wife astray.  Again, I think he is insecure.

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1. How does Hitchcock use montage or expressive editing to add vitality and rhythm to this scene? 


Lots of use of "montage" in this clip. Slow build-up of piano music as the scene unfolds and the man watches his wife. Clips overlap one another, which shows us who is speaking at the moment, yet clearly shows that the man is more concerned with what his wife is doing. 


2. As is the case with a lot of German Expressionist films, in this scene, there are many shots that are very subjective and put us into the psychological mind of a main character. Please note the various techniques Hitchcock uses to create that feeling of subjectivity. 


We look at the various characters through mirrors. We see their facial expressions as they watch one another. This helps convey their own personal feelings towards the present situation. 


3. How does Hitchcock stage the action, use set design, and editing techniques to increase the stakes in the rivalry between the two gentlemen?  


The warped images of the piano and the hands playing and the gradual "frenzied" sound of the piano music helps to create the rivalry between both men. 


 

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This scene from "The Ring" reminds me that sometimes the greatest fight is not against others but within ourselves. Mr. Hitchcock use of mirrors is to exhibit or reflect the character's own mental beliefs. The superimposed mirror images serve to digress from the frenetic scenes of partying and dancing. As if this personal fight is taking the boxer from life's pace and into his own emotional boxing "ring." As the image of the boxer's manager's figure dissolves from the mirror, what remains is the image of the rival and his wife. Another indication that the real fight is being waged within the confines of the boxer.

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