Dr. Rich Edwards

Daily Dose #4: Depends on Your Point of View (Scene from Downhill)

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1. What I liked about the dolly shot was that it took time to get the characters from point a-b. Since it took the characters time, it took the viewers time as well. Within the narrative, this is the time for the characters and the viewers to experience the anxiety and uncertainty that a call to the headmaster's office entails - like the questions going round in your head of why you're there and what's going to happen and how much trouble you're in.

 

2. If Hitch had cut rapidly from the door to the desk, the pacing would not be conducive to the narrative, as it wouldn't allow the time to build the anxiety. Therefore, the dolly/tracking shots for me are less about POV and much more about the pacing/timing and the communing of the though processes of the characters and the audience.

 

3. This coming together of the character's experience and the viewer's experience is similar to the effect Hitch created in the scene from THE RING, though with the opposite result - the dolly shot is used here to slow the pacing down while the quick cuts in THE RING were used to speed up the pace. However, both techniques build a sense of anxiety and a sense of sympathy/empathy with the protagonist.

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1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? 


I think it is absolutely brilliant. Rather than being a spectator, we become a supporter- drawn into what is going on through a personal perspective.


2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling?


As stated above, it definitely draws one further into the viewing. It's somewhat like a dream- there are those where I seem disconnected, "floating" above, and the night terrors wherein I am apart of whatever world my mind has created.


3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure GardenThe Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples.


I see that the POV shots are becoming more common place and more focused... whereas in The Pleasure Garden, we see the stage from the perspective of the audience, it is not quite the same as the moving/interacting with the set with the dolly camera.


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​1. The POV shots in this scene really put you in the place of a character - for example, being at Ivor's point of view makes the viewer feel anxious and vulnerable, whereas Mabel's point of view is more empowering because she is choosing which one she will falsely accuse.

 

​2. I think Hitchcock adds the POV shots in order to invest the viewer into the story more and create suspense. Instead of merely watching the action from the distance, the camera puts you directly into it, as thought you were there or even one of the characters. It adds another dimension to his storytelling.

 

​3. All four films feature subjective POV. The first is the man with the spectacles, the second is the man on the typewriter, the third is the husband thinking about his wife and the champ, and the fourth is both the accused man and the woman who accuses him. Montages specifically are used in The Ring (his daydream/thoughts) and Downhill (Mabel illustrating how it 'happened'). A woman is also the center of tension in all four, but in Pleasure Gardens and The Lodger, they are innocent victims, whereas in Downhill and The Ring, they cause trouble.

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From the opening scene in "Downhill," the camera represents a feeling of intrusiveness. That we are witness to things we should not be seeing and things we should not be "hearing." Mr. Hitchcock uses the camera as an intrusion into the personal space of the characters. It feels almost an invasion of privacy that the camera takes us into and lingers on their personal issues. I believe Mr. Hitchcock may be using his counterpoint reference in this awkward scene, whereas as much as the camera/audience is the nosy intruder upon these folks' personal problems, the camera also compels the audience with curiosity and a staked interest in their plight to continue viewing.

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1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? 


It really pulls you into the action - it gives you a sense of being physically drawn in and emotionally becoming attached to the action.  It's a very cool and unsettling feeling.


2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling? 


I think that he uses the POV tracking shot in order to really involve the audience.  I think that Hitchcock really liked to involve the audience and pull their eye in to see exactly what he wanted them to view.


3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure GardenThe Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples.


In the Pleasure Garden, you are really drawn in with the staircase shot - you are drawn into the action as it dizzyingly spins down the stairs - it helps to guide you into what he wants you to see.  In the Ring, you are again drawn back and forth from the montages to the frenzied dancing and back to the husband to see his anger build.  It is a very cool and artsy technique that really works for him.


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1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? 

I immediately had a feeling of anxiety; I felt what the two students were feeling; a sense of dread, concern, wonder of what the problem could be.

 

2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling? 

As others have said, you are immediately pulled in to the action both physically and mentally. The audience becomes the characters at that moment. This is precisely what Hitchcock wants of his audience; to empathize with the hero.

 

3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure Garden, The Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples. 

The framing of certain individuals such as the chorus girl in The Pleasure Garden and the couple in The Ring

Up close head shots such as in The Lodger, The Ring, The Pleasure Garden.

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1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? I have the feeling of movement and intimacy with the situation.

 

2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling? I think he uses it to establish a sense of being there for the audience. It gives the story more than just the character's movements.

 

3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure Garden, The Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples. Mabel's montages and the ones in The Ring. All three films showed close ups of women's legs emphasizing sexual desire or tension.

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1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? I have always loved POV tracking shots in Hitchcock films, as they force the viewer to keep moving forward toward a person, or situation, that is potentially menacing.  The viewer shares the anxiety and uncertainty of the character yet can't look away.

2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling? Members of the audience are confined to a chair in the dark, yet the tracking POV shots place them into the mind of the character, pulling them into the scene and sharing the suspense.

3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure GardenThe Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples. Voyeurism and POV shots, both static and moving (men in audience, Pleasure Garden; boys approaching head master in Downhill; fighter witnessing party, The Ring.  Man feeling wrongly accused (Lodger, Downhill) or rejected (Pleasure Garden, The Ring)

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In Downfall,  the constant, fluid movement of the tracking shot captures the boys; it holds them in the frame; there is no escape.  Using this technique, Hitchcock builds the tension and anxiety that the audience experiences on behalf of the boys.  As Mabel moves toward the boys, only her face framed, we see the lie in her eyes as they move from one boy to fix on the other, the innocent one. 

By controlling the sets, Hitchcock controls the scenes.  In The Pleasure Garden, the girls spiral down the staircase.  In The Lodger, the tea stand curbs the crowd.  In Downhill, the girl is confined to one corner of the extensive room.  In The Ring, the room, with a fireplace, chair, and fight bill on the wall, sets the boundaries, not unlike a fight ring.  

On the big screen, subtle nuances of expression are larger than life.  The chorus girl’s disdainful look at the ogler with opera glasses in The Pleasure Garden, the blonde’s dying scream in The Lodger, the innocent boy’s expression when he realizes he is being accused in Downhill, and the young boxer’s glower when he imagines his wife kissing another man in The Ring engage the audience.  Hitchcock’s close-ups are never gratuitous.  The emotion the audience sees further draws the viewers into the story. 

And, through no fault of their own, innocent characters find themselves in situations over which they have no control -- the ingénue whose letter is stolen in The Pleasure Garden, the character trying to establish his innocence in The Lodger, the innocent student in Downhill.  The obstacles they encounter drive the action, which further ensures that Hitchcock’s audience is fully invested in the stories he tells.   

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I kept thinking of Mrs. Danvers in Rebecca.  This scene is about Mabel’s accusation and its effect on those involved.  Her movement is minimized – she is sitting when the young men walk into the room and she makes us aware of her by dropping her purse and gathering full attention, becoming the literal fulcrum of the scene.  The movement into the headmaster by the boys almost moves all of the elements into her control.  There is, at times a stage bound quality – the toy men aligned in a single plane, but this works as well because Mabel is going to select one of them and to us they are all equal.  The headmaster may be the executioner, but Mable is jury and judge. She has fire and vengeance in her eyes and while we push in with her on the boys, the plane is absolutely symmetrical.  She is the center of the circle and Hitchcock gives her geometrical prominence both in establishing her without movement and in making her the person with all the power as she walks inbetween the two boys.

 

Hitchcock uses his camera in these scenes seen thus far to establish a very strong and at times unbalanced power dynamic.  This is one where the power rests all in one place (despite the presumed power of the headmaster, merely a referee here).  In The Pleasure Garden, the scene between the chorine and the producer is one where the power subtly shifts between them.  In The Golden Ring, we are watching the power of paranoia destroy our boxer who remains in a position watching a scene playing in his own imagination.  Mabel’s eyes are always boring through the proceedings in her scene; Pleasure Garden has two people looking at each other equally (in a flirtation) and in The Golden Ring, our fighter is praimrily below the action looking up into the mirror/window to the next room.

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Hold everything! Start watching the clip at 2:22. Does the young lady grab the "lower mid-section" of the boy on the right? Of course, he does! Hitchcock loved to put this kind of stuff in his films. The kind of stuff that makes you do a double-take. It's like, "did I just see what I think I saw?"

This is the kind of stuff I love about Hitchcock. Here's the famous scene from 'The 39 Steps' where Robert Donat gets jerked off.

 

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1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? 

At the beginning of clip the boys are walking towards the man at the desk, but instead of them simply walking we have a sense that they are being “pulled” towards by the way the men walk towards the camera.

As the woman walks toward the boys the camera slides into the boys, which gives us the feeling of her approach and when the camera is on her the camera glides away from her as she approaches the boys. This camera technique gives us the feeling that the boys are shrinking from her approach although we cannot see them in the shot.

 

2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling? 

As stated above, we do not need a visual of the boys and how they feel as the woman approaches them because through the eye of the camera as we watch the woman approach the camera slides towards the boys, so we have a feeling of the boys dread. And as the camera glides away from her we can "see" the boys shrinking/cringing from her even though the camera is not on them. 

 

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The headmaster looms large, powerful even without the POV tracking shot. But as the camera slowly, inexorably tracks closer to the headmaster, making him grow in the frame, we get an undeniable look at the utter disdain in his eyes. From the boys' POV, we sense their escalating anxiety as they approach him. The headmaster in addition to being the Supreme Court of the school also seems to possess some sort of strange magnetism that pulls the boys toward him, even against their will.
​More importantly, the boys' POV shot puts us in their shoes. While they don't yet know why they've been called to the office, they--and we--can tell it must be quite serious. (The almost-wicked visage of the headmaster, for me, recalled the Sorcerer's stern face as the guilty apprentice Mickey Mouse approaches him. The headmaster's  judgmental eyes also brought to mind Rasputin or a wicked Svengali.)
The tracking shot cutting back and forth between the headmaster's disapproving expression and the boys' expression conveys that sinking feeling we all felt whenever we were called to the principal's office. 

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1. It feels very smooth and calm. It seems more personal to me. It earlier daily dose actions was fast and chaotic. I really had not noticed this in movies before today.

 

2. You are close to action but not involved with what is going on. You are curious and can not look away. It is like you have a pair of bincoulars watching the action.

 

3. There seems to be conflict with a man and a woman. He does close up shots of peoples faces.

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Hitchcock's use of a subjective POV puts us in the story. It makes us feel the emotional suspense of the situation. The POV tracking shot adds to the storytelling because of the audience, we feel the emotions and tension of the situation as if we are in the story. We move with the characters and see the situation, faces of others in as if in the story too. All three films use close-ups, especially faces filled with emotions of fear. In The Pleasure Garden they are in the audience, the Lodger, the close ups of fearful faces, in the Ring the jealous fighter and his girl, and Downhill he takes close-ups of everyone in the room. And he uses interesting shots as with The Pleasure Garden and the binocular or in Lodger with the woman thinking she is seeing the killer in a reflection or the dream segments in the Ring and his POV tracking shots. All have brought out extreme emotions from voyeurism, fear, frenzy and finally bringing you right into the story.   

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1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? 


It makes you feel a growing sense of anxiety and walking towards something or someone you would rather not be approaching - but you must.


2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling?


It gives the audience a sense of being more involved and part of what is happening on screen.


3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure GardenThe Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? 


Voyeuristic viewpoints of each situation as well as viewpoints from different characters - the girls seeing the old men and the old men ogling the girls in Pleasure Garden, being a voyeur in the crowd eager for every detail of the murder in The Lodger, witnessing the wild party and the growing jealousy of a very anious husband and wannabe champion in The Ring, eavesdropping on a very serious but initially unknown issue in Downfall. You are part of these scenes but still an observer.


The fast editing and montage shots in each film except Downfall. In Downfall you have the accusation of the girl resounding as loudly as the silent screen of golden curls in The Lodger.


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I enjoy watching the POV dolly shots in this scene. They heighten the tension between characters, which I'm sure was, at least in part, Hitchcock's intention. Watching a person moving slowly toward you--her eyes locked on yours--conveys a feeling of a predator stalking her prey. It allows the viewer to be placed squarely in the action, helping him to become more deeply engaged with the characters' emotions.

 

Commonalities between this scene and scenes in other Hitchcock films, like The Ring, include the use of montage and superimposed images, in particular the record player and dancing feet. Those images, when placed over the stern woman speaking, provide the viewer with a sense of what action the student took to upset her. In both the case of Downhill and The Ring, those images symbolize some aspect of debauchery that ultimately lead to a despicable act.

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1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots/POV tracking shots in this scene.

 

The POV tracking shots almost made it seem like the students were walking towards the headmaster in slow motion, and it created a great sense of unease.

 

 

2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling?

 

As Hitchcock is the "Master of Suspense," this was an early way to subtlety add suspense to the scene. I think he used it to bring the viewer more into the story and up the stakes. In the moments where the two students are walking, the viewer is forced to choose who he/she sympathizes with and is rooting for.

 

 

3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure Garden, The Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples.

 

They all had similar montages, and instances of overlaying an action shot on a close up of an actor.

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DAILY DOSE #4 (Downhill)

 

DOLLYBOUND

1. The POV dolly makes it's object more imposing as it gets closer to its subject or as the subject moves towards it.

2. The tracking shot also implies the POV subject and object are on an inevitable collision course.

3. The main stylistic thread is a marriage of the mise en scene to the emotional content.

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1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? 

It’s a feeling of anxiety, of being in the same situation as the characters – looking from one point to the other, waiting for the outcome. The shot of the girl getting closer and closer was the one that stood out to me.

 

2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling? 

I had a feeling that I was in the characters’ shoes, changing quickly from inside the mind of one to the mind of another. I could feel the wrath in the girl’s mind, the desperation in Novello’s eyes – something that could let anyone think he was, indeed, guilty – and the shame in the other guy’s eyes and scared gestures.

This technique made us sympathize with the character played by Novello quickly – I, at least, felt the urge to see this movie as soon as possible!

 

3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure GardenThe Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples. 

I see the montage connection with The Ring. At first I thought the girl was making a threat or cursing the guy, but through the montage I realized she was telling what happened in the night when she got pregnant. And, of course, there is the POV shot that was used even in The Pleasure Garden, in the first scene.

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1. The POV shot is giving you a sense of dread, impending doom at the hands of the woman and headmaster. She looks like she is out for blood, who will it be. The boys fate is in her hands.

 

2. Hitchcock uses this technique to add feeling. Dark and dreadful. No control on their part. Their fate is in someone else's hands. A slow descent into trouble.

 

3. Hitchcock uses close ups and montages to show the actions that supposedly lead up to this moment. He used an overlay of the scenes like he did in The Ring. Just like the things weren't real in The Ring these scenes are also not real in her story.

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POV shots like this one are always interesting because they simultaneously make you feel even more suspenseful or eager to see what going to happen next, yet they make you a little repulsed at the same time. In other words, they both pull you in to the film and make you just uncomfortable enough to the point of wanting to draw back, in totality a very rich effect.

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1 - In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene?

 

I think that the shots definitely tend to keep the characters separate from one another.  Roddy Berwick and Tim Wakeley form a unit, the Headmaster (Dr. Dowson) is another, and Mabel is a third.  It also seems to prolong the action, which is to say that what happens onscreen as Roddy and Tim approach the Headmaster takes up more time than it actually would in real life.  In this particular case, it heightens the tension/suspense (for me) because I am anticipating learning why the two boys have been summoned to the Headmaster’s office:  it quickly becomes clear that it’s nothing pleasant.

 

For me, the cinematography of the scene creates a sense almost of claustrophobia:  although the Headmaster’s office is fairly large, the way that the scene is shot conveys a sense that one is trapped.  This is, of course, a very dramatic scene (one might almost say “melodramatic”), and the shots underscore the drama and emotion of the scene, which is the moment when Roddy’s life begins to “go downhill.”

 

2 - Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot?  What does it add to his visual storytelling?

 

I think that Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot in order to enable the view to identify with Roddy (and Tim) and what is happening to them, as if the viewer is “walking in his shoes” also.  This would increase the viewer’s empathy for Roddy  in the situation.  There is also a sense of “me/us against them.”

 

Visually, this technique (as noted before) prolongs the action and therefore the suspense of the scene.  The effect is almost that of a condemned man walking to the gallows.  It also adds some visual interest to the scene.  The viewer is able to see what is happening as Roddy and Tim see it, so it’s not simply an objective narrative.

 

3 - What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between the films that came before this (The Pleasure Garden, The Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)?  Please cite specific examples.

 

There are quite a few separate shots, so I noticed Hitchcock’s montage:  the camera does not remain stationary or hold on one shot for very long (with one exception).

 

Hitchcock also makes use of a variety of shots, mostly medium shots and close-ups, as he did in both The Lodger and The Ring.  This is particularly the case with the Headmaster (intimidating) and Mabel (malicious):

 

post-74120-0-48111100-1499238058_thumb.jpg

 

post-74120-0-26447800-1499238078_thumb.jpg

 

This scene is definitely Hitchcockian in terms of its visual style and lack of reliance on dialogue/title cards.  There are very few title cards in the scene, and all except one are the Headmaster’s speech (Mabel is the exception, with one).  Oddly enough, Roddy (the protagonist) and Tim don’t have their words clarified by titles.  It is clear that Hitchcock is relying on the images themselves (and the acting), rather than words, to advance the narrative.  Another, less visually-oriented director would probably report more of the dialogue.

 

I had mentioned that there is one shot that is held for a relatively long period of time:  this is the close-up of Mabel’s face as she is relating a false story about what happened between her and Roddy.  Mabel’s actual words are not specified, but the close-up showing her face gives the viewer a very good idea of what she is saying.  Here there is use of double exposure, of superimposing a scene over another, to create a sort of “flashback,” as Hitchcock had done in The Ring.  In this case, two images are superimposed over Mabel’s face:

 

post-74120-0-18920500-1499238101_thumb.jpg

 

And here:

 

post-74120-0-61797500-1499238114_thumb.jpg

post-74120-0-48111100-1499238058_thumb.jpg

post-74120-0-26447800-1499238078_thumb.jpg

post-74120-0-18920500-1499238101_thumb.jpg

post-74120-0-61797500-1499238114_thumb.jpg

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1.    In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? 

 

The effect of watching the dolly shots definitely enhanced the feeling of the scene making me feel the dramatic seriousness of the situation for the two school mates.  For me, the dolly shots put the focus more on the two boys’ shock and worrisome conditions rather than on the waitress’ situation. I felt sorrier for the boys than for her which is confusing because you’d almost think you’d want to feel sorry for her instead.

 

2.    Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling? 

 

I think Hitchcock used this technique to stress the boys’ buildup of anxiety and worry as they realized they were being accused of something.  This technique added a strong sense of suspense and panic for the boys without any movement from anyone else in the room. I was able to feel the dreaded walk that the boys and waitress took as they approached both the headmaster and then her approaching the boys; the buildup of suspense was enticing.

 

3.    What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure GardenThe Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite specific examples.

 

The scenes were similar in Hitch’s use of montage and his close-ups where the facial and body expressions (her breathing heavily in the chair) helped us fee the anxiety buildup similar to what the boxer (The Ring) was going through as he imagined what was happening at the party.  The film overlays were also used in these films.  It allows us to see and feel what happened and what is currently happening; the reality of the party scene in The Ring and the current accusation by the waitress with the overlay allowing us to see her past meeting with a young man.

 

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1. In your own words, please describe the effect of watching the POV dolly shots / POV tracking shots in this scene? 

The POV dolly/tracking shots really do drag the viewer into the scene and the mind of the girl and the two guys. Which guy will she pick? The two guys thinking i hope its not me. Then she picks the guy.

 

2. Why do you think Hitchcock uses the technique of a POV tracking shot? What does it add to his visual storytelling? 

With this film it has no sound so the camera had to be the sound of the characters. It adds another layer of pure cinema. You do not have have to have sound to get your point across. You just have to have 2 things a good story and great visuals.

​One thing i did notice was the people's eyes - they told a story

 

3. What connections (visual techniques, images, motifs, themes) do you notice between films that came before this (The Pleasure GardenThe Lodger) and a film that came after it (The Ring)? Please cite spec

 

I feel like Hitchcock was teaching him self during these silent films. What styles worked and what did not work. You can see the change in his use of the camera from the first film up to this current film that we are one. And this is his 5th film to direct.

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