MyMoll

Your favorite underrated Hitch Films

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What are your favorite Hitch films that aren't block busters.  Mine is Stage Fright.  For one is Marlene Deitrich.  I always felt he used that as an inside joke, particularly when she sings. I really think that bad singing was purposely making fun of her.

 

What's yours and why??

 

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I ran across "Shadow of a Doubt" quite by accident when looking through the laserdiscs at the local video store. I had never heard of it before, but, seeing it was a Hitchcock film, I had to get it. Maybe it doesn't get as much attention as "North by Northwest" or "Dial M for Murder" because maybe the names "Joseph Cotten" and "Teresa Wright" aren't as glamorous as "Cary Grant" and "Grace Kelly", but this is an excellent Hitchcock suspense film and well worth watching over and over again.

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My favorite underrated Hitchcock film is “I Confess”.  Takes us back to Hitchcock’s roots in the Catholic church and deals with some very interesting issues.  Such as a priest being involved in a love triangle and the question of how far that priest will go to preserve the sanctity of the confessional.

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My favorite is Spellbound with Ingrid Bergman and Gregory Peck. It features a dream sequence with images designed by Salvador Dali. I believe it's worth a watch for any Hitchcock fan! 

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Shadow of a Doubt as I am a fan of Joseph Cotton. I also like seeing Santa Rosa in the 40s.

I also enjoy The Trouble with Harry for its black humor and the set direction.

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One of my favorite Hitchcock films is Murder!, which even Hitch wasn't too keen on. I can't exactly explain why either. I just find it fascinatingly odd. As a suspense vehicle or whodunnit it may fail to satisfy, but the issues of class, race, and sexuality all bubbling under the surface make it stand out for me.

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I ran across "Shadow of a Doubt" quite by accident when looking through the laserdiscs at the local video store. I had never heard of it before, but, seeing it was a Hitchcock film, I had to get it. Maybe it doesn't get as much attention as "North by Northwest" or "Dial M for Murder" because maybe the names "Joseph Cotten" and "Teresa Wright" aren't as glamorous as "Cary Grant" and "Grace Kelly", but this is an excellent Hitchcock suspense film and well worth watching over and over again.

 

I love your choice.   First there is no way to determine what film is 'underrated' since that requires gathering data from others;  e.g. a poll of film viewers.    One can't determine what is 'underrated' by others without data.

 

So instead saying which is the best Hitchcock film that didn't have the biggest named stars and hasn't been seen by as many people as his 'hits' (assuming this is true) is a good idea;   OK,  Joseph Cotton was a big star (and fine actor),  but he wasn't at the same 'level' as Grant or Stewart.     Teresa Wright was one of the best secondary actresses of the era (e.g. in The Little Foxes with Davis, and of course her first rate performance in The Best Years of Our Lives),  but she wasn't your classic Hitchcock dame.   

 

Shadow of a Doubt is the type of film well known to those that are really into studio-era films and Hitchcock,  but the general public?   I would assume a lot less people have seen SOAD than films like The Birds, Psycho,  Rear Window etc...

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I generally like Stage Fright a lot, but not for Dietrich.  I find that the film comes to a crashing halt whenever she has a singing scene.  

 

My choice for favorite underrated film would probably be The Trouble with Harry.  Great display of Hitch's wacky morbid humor. 

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I love Shadow of a Doubt, but I never thought of it as underrated.  It was one of Hitch's own personal favorites of his films.  My favorite is Sabotage.  I love Sylvia Sidney and I think it's one of her best performances.  I also love that it is really dark, which is apparently why it wasn't as successful as some of his other films of the era.

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Shadow of a Doubt as I am a fan of Joseph Cotton. I also like seeing Santa Rosa in the 40s.

I also enjoy The Trouble with Harry for its black humor and the set direction.

And another reason to love The Trouble with Harry: Jerry Mathers, not at the Beaver.

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I love the 1953 version of The Man Who Knew Too Much. I don't know if the film itself is considered underrated, but it is often considered inferior to the earlier version. What's do I love about the later version? Doris Day. Talk about underrated. What can't she do?

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I don't know...there are several great soundtracks to Hitchcock films, most notably those by Hermann.  But when there is a high-profile singer doing a couple of songs (a la Dietrich and Day), it just does't work for me.  

  

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I don't see To Catch a Thief mentioned as much as some of Hitchcock's other films and I adore it! The scenery is beautiful, Grace Kelly is beautiful, and frankly Cary Grant is at his most gorgeous! Here's a funny bit of trivia I hope I recall correctly: Jesse Royce Landis who plays Grace Kelly's mother is only eight years older than Cary Grant! It's also a movie that I never figured out before the end, what a...(I don't ever spoil!) 

 

I've always been a sucker for a good cat burglar movie and there aren't enough of them. There are a couple of modern ones I liked but nothing compares, at least so far, to To Catch a Thief. 

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I love the 1953 version of The Man Who Knew Too Much. I don't know if the film itself is considered underrated, but it is often considered inferior to the earlier version. What's do I love about the later version? Doris Day. Talk about underrated. What can't she do?

 

It's Doris Day's singing that makes me dislike this film. I felt it was completely out of place and a bit ridiculous. 

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I'm not sure my favorite underrated Hitchcock film is underrated, but it is Rebecca. I first saw this film as a teenager, and the gothic romance nature of the story hooked me. This is also the first time I was introduced to Sir Laurence Olivier, and I was in love! Grace, elegance, and that wonderful English accent! He made the perfect gothic romance hero to my teenage eyes (maybe even my adult eyes). 

This was the first movie that made me research where the story came from. When I found out that it came from a Daphne du Maurier novel, I began reading her stories and novels. She is still one of my favorites. As far as the film goes, who can forget Dame Judith Anderson's performance as Mrs. Danver's? She is the creepiest housekeeper ever! That character created an arch-type that was used in other films (even spoofed by Cloris Leachman in Young Frankenstein).post-73865-0-27983800-1499441321_thumb.png

I was very excited when I heard Dr. Edwards mention that we will be looking at Rebecca next week. I cannot wait!

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Family Plot. I watched this movie in the "theater" as a teenager.  I only recently saw this movie again on a "On Demand" channel.  Love Karen Black in this movie, and Bruce Dern.   

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I ran across "Shadow of a Doubt" quite by accident when looking through the laserdiscs at the local video store. I had never heard of it before, but, seeing it was a Hitchcock film, I had to get it. Maybe it doesn't get as much attention as "North by Northwest" or "Dial M for Murder" because maybe the names "Joseph Cotten" and "Teresa Wright" aren't as glamorous as "Cary Grant" and "Grace Kelly", but this is an excellent Hitchcock suspense film and well worth watching over and over again.

Actually, Shadow of a Doubt was Hitchcock's favorites of his own films. It's great.

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I agree. I have trouble calling Shadow of a Doubt underrated, just because it was Hitchcock's favorite of his own films. In my opinion it is one of his best and does deserve more attention.

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I just watched To Catch a Thief, and while doesn't land super high my list, it is quite funny and way better than I remember it being. Jesse Royce Landis steals the show.

I don't see To Catch a Thief mentioned as much as some of Hitchcock's other films and I adore it! The scenery is beautiful, Grace Kelly is beautiful, and frankly Cary Grant is at his most gorgeous! Here's a funny bit of trivia I hope I recall correctly: Jesse Royce Landis who plays Grace Kelly's mother is only eight years older than Cary Grant! It's also a movie that I never figured out before the end, what a...(I don't ever spoil!) 

 

I've always been a sucker for a good cat burglar movie and there aren't enough of them. There are a couple of modern ones I liked but nothing compares, at least so far, to To Catch a Thief. 

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I think Rope is underrated. I think people obsess over the technical aspects of it (the long 10-minute shots to look like one continuous shot), but the movie itself is really good. I think it gets dismissed as a technical exercise by a director showing off. But still it's a great movie.

Frenzy is really good. It holds up well both as a Hitchcock thriller and a 1970s film, right at home with the likes of Robert Altman, Francis Ford Coppola, and Martin Scorsese.

I could list half a dozen others, but I'll leave it at that.

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I don't know how underrated it could really be considered, but Rebecca is one of my absolute favorite Hitchcock films. Easily in my top five, but I feel like I don't see it discussed or mentioned very often. I also really like MarnieThe Paradine Case, and Spellbound

 

On a related note, I was kind of surprised at how much I enjoyed watching some of his silent films the other night. Until I signed up for this course, I'd never seen any of them and was only vaguely aware that Hitch got his start in silents. I think I'd maybe only seen one silent movie ever in my life before that. I figured I'd find the silents interesting for educational purposes and general film appreciation "nerding out" reasons, but I didn't expect to be as engrossed as I was. I especially like The LodgerThe Manxman, and Downhill. My fiance/partner is also taking this course and we actually wound up watching The Lodger twice, we liked it so much.

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My choice is Torn Curtain, a Cold War thriller focused on Paul Newman as a US Professor of Physics ostensibly defecting to the USSR, with his wife Julie Andrews in hot pursuit of her husband. But Newman's character is soon found out to be a government agent sent to uncover rocketry secrets, that only a scientist could understand. It soon progresses to a grand chase of soviet agents tracking Newman and Andrews in Russia,  while a secretive underground organization, known as Pi, assists the Professor to escape back to his homeland in the USA.

 

As a young lad, brought up on the Man From U.N.C.L.E. and James Bond, and who, in school, studies math and science, I felt a special connection with Newman's character. And Hitchcock's idea to merge the scientist with the spy, was a true  delight. I wanted to see how the good Professor would prevail.

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I'm a big proponent of the lesser-known Young and Innocent, although I might not call that my top underrated pick.  But I like to spread the word.  Young and Innocent is a lot of fun, from Hitchcock's 1930s "thriller sextet" period.  It's not as dire as other thrillers.  There are no bombs or wars or evil organizations.  Nobody's trying to shoot the protagonist.  It's about a man wrongly arrested for murder, who escapes to try to clear his name and is pursued by the police.  But the great thing about the film is its lighter tone, and the movie is really more of a romance between the man and a young woman (who happens to be the daughter of the police constable).  It's cute and fun and exciting and full of Hitchcock's unique sensibilities.

But I guess my favorite lesser-known Hitchcock film is the awesome (and Oscar-nominated) Foreign Correspondent.  I love classic Hollywood, and Foreign Correspondent's got Joel McCrea (one of my faves from the 1930s-'40s) and Laraine Day, not to mention Robert Benchley as solid comedic support.  (I think Benchley is credited with the film's dialogue, as well.)  Plus you've got international intrigue, unforgettable set pieces (the assassination, the windmill, the hotel escape, the plane), a great romance plot, and a youngish George Sanders.  The cast is charismatic and the script is fun as well as thrilling, and the black and white photography is top-notch.  (I'm sure Hitch fans know Foreign Correspondent, but it may fall under the radar for more mainstream folks.)

 

I ran across "Shadow of a Doubt" quite by accident when looking through the laserdiscs at the local video store. I had never heard of it before, but, seeing it was a Hitchcock film, I had to get it. Maybe it doesn't get as much attention as "North by Northwest" or "Dial M for Murder" because maybe the names "Joseph Cotten" and "Teresa Wright" aren't as glamorous as "Cary Grant" and "Grace Kelly", but this is an excellent Hitchcock suspense film and well worth watching over and over again.

 

There's a lot of love for Shadow of a Doubt.  I'm looking forward to rewatching it next week.  What I remember about it is the great ensemble cast of Hollywood character actors (in addition to the leads).  And I for one am a big Teresa Wright fan.

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My favorite underrated Hitchcock films are I Confess, The Wrong Man, Torn Curtain, and The Trouble With Harry. I have only seen each once, but I Confess and The Wrong Man instantly come to mind when I think of favorite Hitchcock films; although, with such an extraordinary list, it's hard not to just name the entirety of it when thinking about favorites overall. 

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