Dr. Rich Edwards

Daily Dose #8: Cooling Our Heels (Opening Scene from The Lady Vanishes)

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1. Using specific examples, describe how Hitchcock opens The Lady Vanishes. What tone, mood, or atmosphere is Hitchcock establishing for the audience very early on in this picture? Pay particular attention to the music. 

Judging from the facial expressions of the seated guests, the mood seems to be that of frustration contrasted by the light hearted charm of Ms. Froy. In a way, she is already set apart from the rest as someone to pay attention to. After all, she is the lady who vanishes later in the film. 

The clock seemed like a cattle call which indeed it was as the innkeeper gathers all guests prompting them to reserve a room as quickly as possible. Yet, the clock also reflects an attempt to restore order amidst chaos.

 

2. Discuss the characters of Caldicott and Charters in this scene. What do the performances of Caldicott and Charters add to this scene. 

Peanut Gallery. They provide the comedic element, but they also seem to critique the situation and other characters on scene; sort of influencing or at least presenting to the viewing audience how we should see other characters/situations.

 

3. From their doorway entrance to their staircase exit, describe how Hitchcock uses dialogue, camera movement, and the placement of characters in the frame to establish Iris (Margaret Lockwood) as the star of this scene. 

First, I have to say that Iris is a total snob, and I'm glad she is put in her place as the film progresses. I can't stand her character. That said...

Iris establishes herself as the leader of the trio walking in front. She is the speaker as she explains their reason for their early arrival from an outing. The other two just gaggle in the background. If either of them says anything not to her liking, she lightly scolds them. Ex: When her friend mentions eating a horse, she retorts "Don't put any ideas into his head."

There is also this air of superiority as she corrects the innkeeper's pronunciation of avalanche (and he said it correctly). A bit of an insult considering the innkeeper is a polyglot. Iris is also a self-absorbed brat. Everyone is facing the same transportation problem, but "I have to get home tomorrow! How long before they dig it out?" It's all about her own needs. The innkeeper happily obliges to her every command all the while ignoring his other guests.

Throughout the scene as the camera moves, Iris is always at the center until they move up the stairs and she leads the pack all the while (literally) talking down to them.

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The opening scene of the LADY VANISHES sets the tone of the film, mostly lighthearted, pleasant.   The music sounds is very cheerful, warm and cozy in the German style.  The cuckoo clock sounds and the innkeeper bustles about. Charters and Caldecott, a pair of the silly **** Englishmen, seem to be discussing very serious concerns, England on the brink and all that, showing respect by standing during the National Anthem. However,  The Hungarian Rhapsody is not the anthem and the conversation is obviously ridiculous. The young women are greeted effusively by the hotelkeeper, and their conversation is also light and frivolous.   The sinister elements of the train ride are not evident in the opening scene.   

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Using specific examples, describe how Hitchcock opens The Lady Vanishes. What tone, mood, or atmosphere is Hitchcock establishing for the audience very early on in this picture? Pay particular attention to the music. 

 

The tone in the beginning is much different than the typical Hitchcock: the music is very light-hearted, the characters are a little bit exaggerated, even funny and there is nothing ominous about this opening scene. One might think they are watching a comedy! 

 

​There are no sinister overtones and the audience can be fooled into thinking this is a lighthearted film. But knowing Hitchcock, something interesting has to happen! But when? We are the edge of our seats wondering ... a very effective way to engage an audience in the story.

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QUESTION 2: Does anyone know if Peter Bogdanovich was riffing on this film in What’s Up, Doc? when he chose to make his main character (played by Ryan O’Neal) a musicologist?  He also got mixed up in a mess with a girl.

 

WHAT'S UP DOC? is a remake of 1938's Bringing Up Baby, the screwball comedy with Katherine Hepburn and Cary Grant.

 

I think that The Lady Vanishes is now one of my favorite Hitchcock films. I saw snippits of it before on TV, but this is the first time I've really seen it. It's amazingly smart and fun.

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1. The music has a whimsical feel--it made me think of a merry-go-round or an amusement park--with bird-like notes and 3/4 time of a waltz; it works with the caged bird and the cuckoo clock to set a humorous tone to a scene that is quite lively and chaotic.

 

2. I absolutely love these 2 characters. They are a send-up of the quintessential British tourist couple--believing themselves to be more worldly, sophisticated, and important than they actually are. I laughed out loud at the image of both of them standing for the duration of the Hungarian Rhapsody, thinking it to be the Hungarian national anthem (and likely bickering quietly to each other like a married couple at the same time). They serve as comic relief, but also to further establish the setting of the picture in Europe and cement the idea of train travel being difficult due to weather and the political climate of 1938 in the mind of the viewer.

 

3. Iris is consistently placed directly opposite the hotel proprietor, Boris, the man who has been the most active character up until this point. The scene begins showing all three ladies and Boris on equal ground, each one flirting with him and joking in a slightly condescending manner. It is Iris, however, who initiates movement towards the stairs, who corrects Boris's english, and talks over him giving out orders and demands. The scene ends with Iris leading the "charge" up the stairs with Boris and the others in tow. Iris is also the only character who faces towards the camera throughout the scene and who also receives a close-up (I'm not sure what to call it) with only her and Boris in the frame.

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I was out of town, so please excuse the late response:

1. Using specific examples, describe how Hitchcock opens The Lady Vanishes. What tone, mood, or atmosphere is Hitchcock establishing for the audience very early on in this picture? Pay particular attention to the music. 

My first reaction was to that of the music. The folk music is so light, one would think it the introduction to a comedy, not a thriller. The atmosphere is almost light-hearted, different from other opening scenes we've seen so far. There are also little things that introduce humor to the film, such as the old woman. First, we see her come down completely happy, contrasted with the train-goers just sitting around watching her in the lobby. Then, as she tries to leave, it takes two men to wrangle the door from the wind just so she can get out. With the two foreign gentlemen entering and arguing and the obviously distraught man in the desk paired with the cuckoo clock, there is almost a feeling of the absurd.

2. Discuss the characters of Caldicott and Charters in this scene. What do the performances of Caldicott and Charters add to this scene. 

In a way, they kind of remind me of Laurel and Hardy, with the back and forth banter. They offer a subtle humor outside the main characters, and with the their banter, keeps the audience interested in what's going on outside the stars.

3. From their doorway entrance to their staircase exit, describe how Hitchcock uses dialogue, camera movement, and the placement of characters in the frame to establish Iris (Margaret Lockwood) as the star of this scene. 

First off, the hotel manager completely bypasses everyone else to talk to her and her friends, despite the fact that he had just told all the stranded passengers that they needed to register immediately in order to get a room. As a star, she gets preferential treatment. Iris also has the impertinence to correct Boris on his pronunciation, something she wouldn't have gotten away with had she not been the star. Boris also doesn't make Iris and her friends register for a room, meaning either she is special enough just to claim a room, or that she is important enough to have a standing reservation. As all this is going on, the other passengers are just staring and watching them. They become the center of attention.

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Hitchcock opens this film with a location shot of the tiny village in which we will find the hotel which is obviously made up from miniatures, which I don't think Hitchcock really tries to hide, and which instead emphasizes the somewhat "fairy-tale" nature of the narrative, which involves a sleeping beauty who awakes to a different world than the one she fell asleep in. In addition, the first few minutes are silent, and it is only when Miss Froy "vanishes" out of the door, that a cacaphony of noises and voices fill the soundtrack. Much importance is placed on the role of language here - from the misinterpretations of Charters and Caldicott, to the hotel manager translating his message into different languages, to Iris correcting his pronounciation. This seems to set up the theme that language is key to control and reality. 

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1. Using specific examples, describe how Hitchcock opens The Lady Vanishes. What tone, mood, or atmosphere is Hitchcock establishing for the audience very early on in this picture? Pay particular attention to the music. 

 

It looks and sounds like a comedy or slap stick comedy film.

2. Discuss the characters of Caldicott and Charters in this scene. What do the performances of Caldicott and Charters add to this scene. 

The performances of those two are known as the comedy relief and they kind of tell the audience what is going on at the same time to fill in the missing pieces.

3. From their doorway entrance to their staircase exit, describe how Hitchcock uses dialogue, camera movement, and the placement of characters in the frame to establish Iris (Margaret Lockwood) as the star of this scene. 

Its a tight shot on all 5 chatarters from the door to the staircase. It also is explained that they were just at that hotel a week ago and get personal service compared to the other guests who can not get a room. And we can tell that Iris has money because of the things she is ordering for her and her friends. And the crowd who waits below the stairs just drop their jaws on how fast those 4 get a room while they are all sitting cold downstiars

 

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​1. The music makes the scene cheerful and lighthearted, if not a little chaotic, and the tone of the folk music makes the chaos funny rather than stressful - the obnoxious cuckoo clock, the multitasking owner on the phone, trying to give instructions in different languages - it makes for a comedic beginning.

 

​2. Caldicott and Charters are characters that give comedic commentary to the situations at hand, such as ridiculing the women that walk in and are given special treatment. Like another commenter said, they are like an old married couple and just add some more depth to the story with their side issues and bickering. 

 

​3. Iris is clearly the star from the moment she walks into the room. Boris, who was about to address Caldicott and Charters, immediately ignores them and practically runs to greet Iris and her friends. The whole room stares as she is lead to a room without having to register, and Boris says yes to their every wish. He doesn't even mind when she corrects his English, and their ascension up the stairs establishes their prominence and status in the scene.

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1. The hotel is quaint and picturesque. The hotel manager is charming and funny in his flustered way. The travelers are relaxed and calm while they're waiting. The music is upbeat and sets a light tone. When the older lady exits and the two men come in speaking loudly, combined with the cuckoo clock chiming ... the scene becomes more lively. It's fun to see the reactions of the different characters.


2. Caldicott and Charters definitely add humor. I liked the line "Why the Deuce didn't he say so in the first place?" after the hotel manager finally makes the announcement in English. Typical traveler to expect his own language to be the most important. They're funny because I don't think they're trying to be. Bickering because they stood for the 20-minute Hungarian national anthem, they were the only two standing, etc. .. very funny. I do think as a pair, they can be a useful storytelling device.


3. The hotel manager addresses Iris by name and only greets the others as "Ladies" which immediately tells us she's the star. The other two blonde actresses resemble one another which makes the dark-haired Lockwood stand out. The camera keeps Iris in the frame even when the others have dropped out and fallen into step behind Iris and the manager. Then there is the two-shot of Iris and the manager when she tells him she's going home tomorrow. She has a laid-back but authoritative way of speaking to the manager ... ordering magnums of champagne, making jokes about changing the sheets and eating horses, correcting his pronunciation of "avalanche". She seems sweet enough -- not unlikable at all -- but maybe a little bit spoiled.


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The opening looks and feels like a comedy and romantic film. Caldicott and Charters play as the comedic relieves, telling what's going on in the opening scene. It is one scene where all five cbharacters are in. The scene explains they all have been in a hotel for a week and get service compared to the other hotel guests whom has not got any service. Iris is the guest that has money because she is ordering for herself and her friends.

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The music begins jolly and is disturbed by conflict of new arrivals; the cockoo joins in on the disturbance. It is the complete opposite of the scene. The people's departure is postponed and the mood is drab, the lovely skiers enter and have VIP treatment and are definitely more in tune with the opening music ---lighthearted and content. Caldicott and Charters simply display the tone of the other bystanders, what's going on, what do we do now? They are most formal and **** while the girls are happy go lucky; another complete opposite. Iris is the center stage and POV close up. The hotel manager is most concerned with meeting her needs during her stay. You know she's been there before and he hopes to accommodate, I think he's crushing on a brunette. Another opposite. C&C are aware of their insignificance and are most likely a bit VIP themselves although no one else is aware. A great opening scene and movie, loved it!!!

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1. Using specific examples, describe how Hitchcock opens The Lady Vanishes. What tone, mood, or atmosphere is Hitchcock establishing for the audience very early on in this picture? Pay particular attention to the music. An extremely lighthearted opening scene with an establishing shot showing lots of characters and a POV moving into set (lobby of the inn).  To me, the scene has definite German Expressionist influence with the shadows and the obtuse and oblique angles of the interior design.  Accordingly, the indigenous folk music seems to establish the scene as being somewhere in continental Europe instead of England.

2. Discuss the characters of Caldicott and Charters in this scene. What do the performances of Caldicott and Charters add to this scene. To extend from observation above, Hitchcock hints at the location early with the music, whereas Caldicott and Charters more or less confirm the location/setting (context) with their dialogue.  They seem to be articulating what the audience is likely thinking.

3. From their doorway entrance to their staircase exit, describe how Hitchcock uses dialogue, camera movement, and the placement of characters in the frame to establish Iris (Margaret Lockwood) as the star of this scene. Iris is usually shown in the lead, when walking across the lobby, and isolated from the other two female characters in medium close ups with the innkeeper.  She has a confident air, especially when placing and giving orders.  Interestingly, she is a brunette, while her companions are blondes...a bit of a diversion from expectations of Hitchcock, however, brunettes do re-surface on later Hitchcock as strong yet under appreciated (and sometimes tragic) characters (Suzanne Pleshette, The Birds).

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1) The opening scene clearly depicts travelers waiting despairingly for the next train to depart. Suddenly the mood is defined by the folkloric and whimsical background music. the switch is effective. Hitchcock introduces minor characters of different backgrounds to add dark humor and flavor to the scene. the hotel manager dominates the scene with his comical fast paced mannerisms.he gives orders in several languages in an exaggerated way.Evidence of the influence of slapstick

.

2)The two gentlemen serve as the Greek chorus for the viewer, gossiping like two old ladies and giving us info on the action.Their comments are very political, a sly way for Hitch to tell us what he thinks.

 

3)Iris the star is identified by the constant focus of the camera on her. The hotel manager addresses her by name and by passes others to tend to her. She leads the others up the stairs (including Boris) and makes the decisions for her group. She even orders a magnum of champagne.A little uppity but interesting.

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1. Using specific examples, how does Hitchcock open "The Lady Vanishes"? What tone, mood, or atmosphere is Hitchcock establishing for the audience very early on in this picture?  Pay attention to the music.  The tone & moodwith the music and the rather comedic proprietor give it an air of whimsy and lighthearted pleasantness. Nothing in this part seems particularly foreboding. 

2. Discuss the characters of Caldicott and Charters in this scene. What do their performances add to this scene?  We can almost step into their shoes, since they are Englishmen who are trying to figure out what is going on, what is the cause of the hold-up. We get some insights into them with the conversation regarding cricket and the supposed Hungarian national anthem. Also, they seem like a source of comic relief.

3. Describe how A. Hitchcock uses dialogue, camera movement, and placement of characters in the frame to establish Iris as the star of this scene.  The proprietor immediately moves to the door to greet her and her friends, like he didn't even notice other customers at the time. Then, the scene, camera, dialogue is all focused on her and her small group until they are out of sight - gone upstairs. 

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1. It's both frantic and whimsical, the avalanche has caused delays for everyone, where are they to sleep, will they catch their connections, etc., but it's also all very British, we're imposed upon, but that's how it goes, roll on.

2. They immediately set the tone for whimsy, quick-witted, care-free banter, and they are comfortable with each other as traveling companions, and perhaps more. No matter the situation ahead, these two are bound to make it all seem okay.

3. It's as if a well-known celebrity has entered the room, the hotel manager rushes over and past Charters and Caldicott, they begin discussing her importance, the camera follows the girls, after establishing their familiarity with the manager, and the need to leave by morning. Even after their departure Charters and Caldicott are still following them and discussing who they might be. Iris in particular stands out, as she does most of the talking, and the group seems to be following after her. Iris is relevant, important, and has to get out by morning.

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1. Using specific examples, describe how Hitchcock opens The Lady Vanishes. What tone, mood, or atmosphere is Hitchcock establishing for the audience very early on in this picture? Pay particular attention to the music. 

The music sets the easy going mood of the movie, bring a light tone to the characters giving the audience an happy atmosphere to play along with.

 

2. Discuss the characters of Caldicott and Charters in this scene. What do the performances of Caldicott and Charters add to this scene. 

Both characters bring the comic relief the scene needs with the chitchat.

 

3. From their doorway entrance to their staircase exit, describe how Hitchcock uses dialogue, camera movement, and the placement of characters in the frame to establish Iris (Margaret Lockwood) as the star of this scene.

Hitchcock uses trivial conversation, profile shots and moves the camera in one direction(from the door to the stairs)with Iris centered around everybody... the two companions plus the hotel manager. The other characters serving as audience to the action without leaving the necessary information behind.

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1. Using specific examples, describe how Hitchcock opens The Lady Vanishes. What tone, mood, or atmosphere is Hitchcock establishing for the audience very early on in this picture? Pay particular attention to the music. 

Te song is very sweet and simple. The tune, the cuckoo clock and the fact that we can hear German and Italian being spoken made me imagine that Bandrika could be a metaphor for Switzerland, or at least a Bavarian country. Because of the avalanche and the delay, it’s not exactly a playful atmosphere, but it is light and dark at the same time. It’s the atmosphere of coincidences that put strangers in thrilling adventures.

 

2. Discuss the characters of Caldicott and Charters in this scene. What do the performances of Caldicott and Charters add to this scene. 

After this first scene, I imagined Charters and Caldicott would have a bigger part in the picture. They are here for comic relief and, more than that, to be the first link with the audience: by seeing what they see, and thinking about how the manager treats Iris, they are the first characters the audience identifies with.

 

3. From their doorway entrance to their staircase exit, describe how Hitchcock uses dialogue, camera movement, and the placement of characters in the frame to establish Iris (Margaret Lockwood) as the star of this scene. 

The first thing showing that Iris is important is the fact that the manager leaves his place to greet her, leaving Charters and Caldicott behind. The camera follows her and her friends through the hall. The manager wants to make sure everything is right for them, and will give them any food or comfort they want. As they go upstairs, all the other people in the hall look at them, mad that the manager stopped giving information in order to talk to those “important people”.

 

 

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1. Hitchcock opens this picture like it's the opening to a slapstick comedy. The tinny flute music heard as the film begins sets an overall happy tone and mood for the film.

 

2. Caldicott and Charters are just two simple men who end up being the comic relief based on their conversations.

 

3. He uses the characters and camera to make Iris as if she was royalty, and the manager leaves his post to please her as if he was contractually obligated to when she enters the room.

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The opening to this film next to Mr. and Mrs. Smith is the funniest of any Hitchcock film I've ever scene.   You have so many sounds going on: cuckoo clocks, and Swiss like gay, folk dancing music popping in the background of an overcrowded hotel, or chalet. This is farcical chaos.  There has been an avalanche and the trains are not running so the hotel is overbooked and the manager is overwhelmed.    

 

Immediately, we are introduced to key players in the film.  They are chorus girls led by Margaret Lockwood who plays Iris and knows how to get around the manager with charm and bribery; Basil Radford as Charters and his friend, Naunton Wayne as Caldicott, who seem to only care about getting back to England before the Cricket finals. These English gentlemen are banal characters, yet so funny because their myopic obsession of Cricket is both annoying and funny because they banter about a game, while we know because of the title, The Lady Vanishes, another game, cat, and mouse, with more serious consequences is about to be played and these men won't notice or care what's going on.  We meet Dame May Whitty who plays Mrs. Floy; she seems rather a good hearted old soul who has been in this make believe Swiss like country for several years.

 

Now, we are wondering which lady will vanish?  The opening scene points us toward Iris because is so prominent and above noise and the restrictions placed on the other guests.  Her behavior toward the manager is both beguiling and cynical as she is able to arrange for her and her two friends to keep their fine rooms, while the others, like Charters and Caldicott, have to make due with scraps.  

 

Perhaps, this is also part of why there is a conflict with these characters later on?

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1. Using specific examples, describe how Hitchcock opens The Lady Vanishes. What tone, mood, or atmosphere is Hitchcock establishing for the audience very early on in this picture? Pay particular attention to the music. 


He establishes a calm, light-hearted, and jovial atmosphere.  The music gives you a sense that something comedic could happen at any moment.  


 


2. Discuss the characters of Caldicott and Charters in this scene. What do the performances of Caldicott and Charters add to this scene. 


They give us a little more insight into what is going on, and we get a look into the minds of everyone stranded in the lobby.


 


3. From their doorway entrance to their staircase exit, describe how Hitchcock uses dialogue, camera movement, and the placement of characters in the frame to establish Iris (Margaret Lockwood) as the star of this scene. 


The camera doesn't move off of them, except when it turns back to see all the other people in the lobby watching the girls intently.  They are front and center, and take up most of the frame.  Iris corrected the hotel clerk's pronunciation to a fancier version, giving her more of a star quality.


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1. Using specific examples, describe how Hitchcock opens The Lady Vanishes. What tone, mood, or atmosphere is Hitchcock establishing for the audience very early on in this picture? Pay particular attention to the music. 

At first the tone is light with the lady is smiling and happy which is supported by the upbeat and happy music while she is there, even though the characters look bored.  However, when she leaves, there is a change of mood where the characters are arguing, frustrated, and noisy, which is supported by the cacophony of sounds.

There is also the frustration of the passengers of the train because of the avalanche.

2. Discuss the characters of Caldicott and Charters in this scene. What do the performances of Caldicott and Charters add to this scene. 

These men are the stereotypical “British” subjects who consider themselves and their needs foremost to any other nationality along with their attention to manners and the right “British” way of doing things.The men are discussing their frustration of trying to get to the cricket match on time along with the more disturbing subject of war

3. From their doorway entrance to their staircase exit, describe how Hitchcock uses dialogue, camera movement, and the placement of characters in the frame to establish Iris (Margaret Lockwood) as the star of this scene. 

First, the manager of the inn goes straight to Iris and shakes her hand first. Second, she stays at in the foreground of the shots and next to the manager while walking toward the stairs. Third, the other girls are completely left out of the shot as the manager and Iris move closer to the stairs. Next, the manager passes her and Iris is placed above the other girls, as they return to the shot. Iris is in the middle between the manager and the girls.  The next shot is focused on only the manager and Iris. As they walk up the stairs, Iris stays in the middle of the shot.

 

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The scene starts out light-hearted and happy with the music, but once the two men with skis come in all flustered, the scene starts to get a little more chaotic. Iris is clearly the star of the scene with the hotel owner going straight to her, the camera framing her front and center, and how she sort of dominated the conversation.

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I know I'm super-late to this discussion, but I still want to share my thoughts...

 

1. Using specific examples, describe how Hitchcock opens The Lady Vanishes. What tone, mood, or atmosphere is Hitchcock establishing for the audience very early on in this picture? Pay particular attention to the music.

 

Like Dr. Edwards and Gehring said in the video, the lively, happy music establishes a light mood amidst the chaotic scene. Once again, Hitchcock opens the film in a crowded setting, and frames it in a way that you can see everybody on the screen to convey how busy the inn and the manager are.

 

One thing that caught my attention was the actual opening, right before where the DD starts, with the pan over the miniature set where we can see the trains and the avalanche. I thought it was interesting that a couple of years later, he would start Rebecca in a very similar way: with a camera pan over the miniature set of Manderlay.

 

2. Discuss the characters of Caldicott and Charters in this scene. What do the performances of Caldicott and Charters add to this scene.

 

First thing is that they are scene stealers. Great, engaging actors that immediately grab your attention They seem to serve as audience channels as I think Hitchcock uses them to voice what the audience might be thinking at the moment. They seem educated and well-traveled.

 

3. From their doorway entrance to their staircase exit, describe how Hitchcock uses dialogue, camera movement, and the placement of characters in the frame to establish Iris (Margaret Lockwood) as the star of this scene.

 

It is a perfect way to establish that Iris is an important, wealthy person, and someone that gets what she wants (i.e. kicking a guest out of his room). Hitchcock moves the camera to follow the inn manager all the way to the entrance, and through their walk, and up the stairs. As opposed to previous shots where the camera tried to focus on all the guests, the camera focuses only on the manager, Iris, and her friends.

 

Aside of camera movement, the way they walk past everybody without not even acknowledging anyone, and how they immediately get "their" room without having to register shows how important they are. They know everybody there, they know the place, the room, the sheets, so they can just walk up.

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1. Using specific examples, describe how Hitchcock opens The Lady Vanishes. What tone, mood, or atmosphere is Hitchcock establishing for the audience very early on in this picture? Pay particular attention to the music.

Hitchcock’s use of upbeat music and the bustle of people coming and going contrast what would be a typically serious, somber situation of stranded travelers and an avalanche. The polyglot dialogue emanating from Boris, the telephone call which can hardly be heard, the wind which blows the papers, the cuckoo clock chiming all contribute to the light cacophony.

2. Discuss the characters of Caldicott and Charters in this scene. What do the performances of Caldicott and Charters add to this scene.

Fast and slow, loose and tight, the characters of Caldicott and Charters add the pause and calm to the bustling scene; thereby relaxing the tension that viewers would feel with uninterrupted action.

3. From their doorway entrance to their staircase exit, describe how Hitchcock uses dialogue, camera movement, and the placement of characters in the frame to establish Iris (Margaret Lockwood) as the star of this scene.

Iris (Margaret Lockwood) is on the side closest to the audience which gives her importance. She also leads the conversation and gives the orders which also confirms her central place. The closeup of the group and movement of the four through the room and up the stairs again emphasizes the power the girls, and in particular Iris, have over the other would be customers/patrons in the room.

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