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jfedelchak

Other FIlms Made in the Hitchcock Style...

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I wanted  to address a new topic: Films made by other directors, but which bear a resemblance to Hitchcock's style.

 

 

...For my choice I submit Stanley Donen's Arabesque, staring Gregory Peck and Sofia Loren. Peck is Professor Polloc, who is  teaching in London, caught up in a mystery of a coded message, in the form of an Egyptian hieroglyphic inscription. The message could have grand political implications.; sending him on his own chase as he attempts to un-code the message and determine who is to be trusted. Along the way he encounters an Arabic Sheik, a rich Egyptian and his man-servant, and the alluring Sofia Loren (who was not a blonde, but is gorgeous none the less).

 

Arabesque is full of quirky characters, who could either be friend or foe (or possibly both), a plot to assassinate, suspense and intrique, misdirection, cleaver dialog and wonderfully humorous moments (eg. Polloc, hiding from pursuers in Lorne's bath, while she is using it.) Also, a beautifully choreographed murder attempt in a construction site, and following a surprise revelation, an excellent rescue and final chase that will keep you on the edge of your seats.

 

I have always loved this film and think of Hitch every time I see it.

 

...what are your examples of films done in the Hitchcock style?

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I would suggest Charade, also by Stanley Donen:

 

A young American in Paris (Audrey Hepburn) flees a trio of crooks who are trying to recover the fortune her late husband stole from them. The only person she can trust is Cary Grant's suave, mysterious stranger. Director Stanley Donen goes deliciously dark for Charade, a glittering emblem of sixties style and macabre wit.

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I would suggest Charade, also by Stanley Donen:

 

A young American in Paris (Audrey Hepburn) flees a trio of crooks who are trying to recover the fortune her late husband stole from them. The only person she can trust is Cary Grant's suave, mysterious stranger. Director Stanley Donen goes deliciously dark for Charade, a glittering emblem of sixties style and macabre wit.

 

Yes, this is the Donen bookend to Arabesque, and an equally crafted and entertaining film. With a wonderful cast, including George Kennedy, James Colburn and the ever entertaining Walter Matthau.

 

This would make a terrific double-feature DVD/Blu-ray release of Mr. Donen's work:  Arabesque & Charade

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I was just thinking about this. My nomination would be Witness for the Prosecution. Great ensemble, lots of humor, good plot. About directed by the great Billy Wilder. Been remade but why tamper with perfection?

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I agree Charade, Arabesque, and Wait until Dark, it's very suspenseful with comedic touches

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I was just thinking about this. My nomination would be Witness for the Prosecution. Great ensemble, lots of humor, good plot. About directed by the great Billy Wilder. Been remade but why tamper with perfection?

 

An excellent choice, a classic and finely tuned story worthy of Hitchcock.

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I agree Charade, Arabesque, and Wait until Dark, it's very suspenseful with comedic touches

 

...Another great choice for the Hitchcock motif

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   I definitely agree on Charade and Wait Until Dark. Charade is the one that immediately came to mind. I also think of Stoker, Bunny Lake Is Missing and Gaslight. Stoker, not as much in style as it's content. It's very reminiscent of Shadow of a Doubt. 

   And I have to say Plein Soleil (Purple Noon), a French movie and the first adaptation of The Talented Mr. Ripley. Alfred Hitchcock actually really wanted to make this movie adaptation, but Rene Clement got to the rights first. So, the next best thing for Hitchcock was Strangers On A Train. It always makes me think of how we might not have Strangers On A Train if not for this, or we would have Alfred Hitchcock's The Talented Mr. Ripley. I said "I have to say Plein Soleil (Purple Noon)" because this is my all-time favorite movie AND it often gets compared to a Hitchcock film. I like to think of it as a mix of Hitchcock and art house. 

   I've also frequently heard Diabolique (another French film) is like a Hitchcock film, but I have yet to seen that one. 

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   I've also frequently heard Diabolique (another French film) is like a Hitchcock film, but I have yet to seen that one. 

 

Diabolique is excellent (as are other films by Henri-Georges Clouzot, like Le Corbeau and The Wages of Fear).  I believe the story I heard was that Hitchcock was interested in adapting the novel of Diabolique, but Clouzot beat him to it.  So, as a consolation prize, the authors of that story wrote Vertigo for Hitchcock.

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How about Blue Velvet? That's got a few Hitchcockian motifs embedded in it, Rear Window's voyeurism, Frank's brutality can be considered an extension of the psychosis (and misogyny) displayed in Frenzy, and Shadow of a Doubt seems to be in there as well, with both Lumberton and Santa Rosa containing dark underbellies, a protagonist whose innocence/ignorance is threatened and strange intimations of the uncanny, just under the surface.

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Any movie directed by William Castle. He was like a B-movie version of Hitchcock, and most of his movies included silly "gimmicks," like skeletons rigged to fly thru the audiences during the showings of "House on Haunted Hill", and Joan Crawford, who starred in "Straitjacket", did a theater tour with Castle when the movie was released, and would come up to the stage swinging an axe around. Castle also directed movies such as "13 Ghosts", "Homicidal", and "13 Frightened Girls."

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A number of Brian de Palma's early films are overt homages to Hitchcock: Blow Out, Body Double, Dressed to Kill. His horror films also have the psychological insight found in Hitchcock I think.

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Three Hitchcock-style films that were not Alfred Hitchcock productions come to mind:

  1. 1944's "Gaslight" directed by George Cukor and starring Charles Boyer, Ingrid Bergman, and Joseph Cotten. The overall texture of the film, the plot, the characters, and the dialogue are very "Hitchcock," and the entire "look" is his.
  2. 1965's "Mirage" directed by Edward Dmytryk and featuring Greg Peck, Diane Baker, and Walter Matthau. It's a later-style Hitchcock story, with amnesia, vanishing basements, mysterious characters, an odd love story and a great MacGuffin. And one of Matthau's great lines: " I can't help it, I'm excessively happy-go-lucky."
  3. 1967's "Wait Until Dark" directed by Terence Young and starring Audrey Hepburn, Alan Arkin, and Richard Crenna. The whole concept of a blind person being stalked, the dark shadowy spaces, the discordantly de-tuned piano, and Arkin's terrifying leap after being stabbed, are all reminiscent of the Master of Suspense.
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I'll throw out another De Palma title: OBSESSION (1976). There are numerous De Palma movies that have sections that are more or less amped up Hitchcock filtered into De Palma's interests like in DRESSED TO KILL or BODY DOUBLE, which both have been mentioned in this thread. BODY DOUBLE though is a lot seedier.

 

Stylistically, while there are some overlaps, in terms of content, themes, motiffs, I'd say DARK PASSAGE is Hitchcock-esque, though it's more noir than most Hitchcock. 

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Some very excellent selections in this thread.

 

I would like to throw out one more:  Body Heat, with William Hurt and Kathleen Turner. More a modern film noir, I believe it has a lot of Hitchcock touches, including the double-chase; although in this case our lead is decidedly guilty and the chasers are the police and Kathleen Turners' character herself (Hurt's would-be partner and cohort in crime.), who, it turns out, is the person Hurt is chasing after (maybe a triple-chase).

 

It is a masterful mystery with suspense all around and a plot that keeps you guessing throughout.

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Charade directed by Stanley Donen

Wait Until Dark directed by Terrence Young

Witness directed by Peter Wier

The Firm directed by Sidney Pollack

These come to mind, I'm sure there's many others

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Has anyone mentioned Phone Booth starring Colin Farrell? This strikes me as a highly effective film in the limited-setting mode.

 

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How about One Hour Photo with Robin Williams

And maybe even Sunset Boulevard with William Holden, Eric Von Strohiem, and Gloria Swanson

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