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Bronxgirl48

Great Honk, Zaneeta!

45 posts in this topic

I saw all three. The television version was awful, beyond belief. How anything could be that misguided, is pretty amazing. Craig Bierko, virtually channeled Robert Preston, and the production was fine. Although, I'm no Rebecca Luker fan. Dick Van Dyke was great in the role, and it was a very splashy production. Christian Slater was Winthrop in that production. None of them holds a candle to the 1962 film version.

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You know, it's funny you should mention that. I've actually been meaning to rent it some day. Not that I have awfully high expectations, really. Just kinda like watching stuff with Matthew Broderick every once in a while.

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interesting... I tried to watch the Broderick version and instantly disliked it (and him).... I seem to remember seeing Van Dyke on TV doing a scene....

 

and I saw the clip of Bierko on the Tony Awards.... he wasn't bad

 

I'm with you; I'll stick to the Preston film..... and all those terrific actors in bits parts: Mary Wickes, Charles Lane, George Fawcett, Percy Helton, Jesslyn Fax, Peggy Mondo, etc.

 

In Jane Fonda's last bio she mentions "dating" Timmy Everett when she was a young woman. He's the lead dancer in the Preston film, the juvenile delinquent.

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It might depend somewhat on whether you normally dislike Broderick. He seems to have done a good job with The Producers, at least on stage, so I'd have guessed most people would have liked him in other musical roles.

 

Of course, the movie wasn't nearly as popular as the Broadway musical, so who knows?

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Broderick, who I normally like, was easy to dislike in the role. He had absolutely no personality, whatsoever. He was like a 3rd grader taking on the grown-up role of Harold Hill, and just looking silly in the process. He and Kristen Chenoweth had zero chemistry, and the whole production looked like it was done on a shoestring. An acquaintance of mine did the orchestrations, so I wanted to like it. Even he expressed his dismay, after actually seeing the finished product.

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I usually like Broderick.... it just didn't work. I think the role of Harold Hill needs a big outgoing personality (sorta like a male Ethel Merman or Carol Channing) and Broderick doesn't have that....

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Shipoopi, Shipoopi.....I don't mind Buddy, cause he looks like Costello, which is actually the only thing I like about him.

 

I like when the ladies who are sewing are looking up at the "grecian urn" number and quietly exclaiming, "Oh, isn't that wonderful!" It's little touches like that that make the movie so special for me.

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Maybe he was terminally depressed at having been played on screen by lounge lizard extraordinaire, George Hamilton.

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In Los Angeles, in the late 70's, with Ron Moody as of course Fagin. My girlfriend and I met him backstage; he was in shorts and an undershirt. I don't recall who played Nancy or Bill or Oliver.

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Rex Harrison is supposed to be bullying; that's the way the role is written. As for hamminess, did you know that George Bernard Shaw wanted Charles Laughton for the role of Higgins in the 1938 film of "Pygmalion"? Imagine how that would have turned out! Looks like Rex Harrison was the perfect Higgins.

 

Cary Grant would have been too likable in the role; nobody would have believed that he could bully Eliza. And as for singing ability, Deborah Kerr didn't really sing in "The King and I" either, but nobody ever complains about her performance. Natalie Wood didn't sing in "West Side Story" either.

 

And about Moss Hart directing the film of "My Fair Lady" - he didn't decline the film. He died - in 1961, while "Camelot" was still playing on Broadway, and three years before "My Fair Lady" was released as a film.

 

Message was edited by: AlbertCD

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While I disagree that Cary Grant could have been "too likeable" in the role, you make a very good point regarding Deborah Kerr and Natalie Wood - and you're absolutely right, Audrey Hepburn possessed just the right note, I think, to play Eliza and give her such a luminous soul.

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Deborah Kerr didn't really sing in "The King and I" either, but nobody ever complains about her performance. Natalie Wood didn't sing in "West Side Story" either.

 

The big difference betweenThe King and I and West Side Story and My Fair Lady, is that Deborah Kerr worked hand in hand with Marni Nixon to deliver a seemless (and flawless) performance. Natalie Wood and Audrey Hepburn both thought they were doing their own singing, and didn't work with Nixon at all. So, instead of synching to recordings of Marni Nixon as Deborah Kerr perfected, both Hepburn and Wood filmed their scenes, syncing to their own voices. Marni Nixon came in after the fact and overdubbed them. Nowhere near as good a technique, and it shows in both films, especially the horribly-made My Fair Lady.

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The big difference betweenThe King and I and West Side Story and My Fair Lady, is that Deborah Kerr worked hand in hand with Marni Nixon to deliver a seemless (and flawless) performance.

 

From the point of view of the audience, it probably didn't matter much, although of course purists could argue about it for decades to come. For the casual viewer, all 3 movies offer wonderful performances, and whether or not an actress was dubbed is not necessarily going to hinder the viewer's enjoyment of the movie.

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