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sewhite2000

What Movies Aired on HBO in September, 1977

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Found a YouTube video that shows an actual physical HBO program guide from September, 1977, back when they were typically on eight or 10 hours a day. Here's every movie that aired that month, plus whether those movies have ever aired on TCM (thanks to MovieCollectorOH's database for that info). Most of these movies haven't aired on TCM, and though it would cause screams from the "never show a movie more recent than 1960 crowd", who have thankfully been quiet for a long time now, I wouldn't mind seeing TCM show some of these films.

 

End of the Game (20th Century Fox, 1975) - European-set murder mystery/police procedural with Jon Voight, Martin Ritt (in an acting role), Jacqueline Bissett and Robert Shaw. Donald Sutherland appears as the corpse. It's got a director in an acting role, and an actor directing - it was directed by Maximilian Schell. (Ever aired on TCM? No)

 

The Next Man (Allied Artists, 1976) - Sean Connery plays an Arab diplomat (!), who becomes a target for multiple, competing assassination attempts after he invites Israel to join OPEC. Starring Connery and ... literally no one else you've ever heard of. (Ever aired on TCM? No)

 

Twilight's Last Gleaming (Allied Artists, 1977) - Suspense thriller about a renegade Air Force general (Burt Lancaster), serving time in a military prison on a trumped-up manslaughter charge to keep him quiet, who escapes and takes over an ICBM silo in Montana. There he demands that the president of the United States (Charles Durning) read the top secret executive action memo that reveals the  real reason America got into the Vietnam War live on television, or he'll launch all nine of his missiles at the Soviet Union and set off World War III. Impressive cast also includes Richard Widmark, Joseph Cotten, Melvyn Douglas, Richard Jaeckel, Paul Winfield, Burt Young and Charles McGraw. (Ever aired on TCM? No)

 

Treasure Island (Filmation, 1973) - Animated version of the Robert Louis Stevenson story. (Ever aired on TCM? No)

 

Midway (Universal, 1976) - Apparently inspired by the success of Tora! Tora! Tora! a few years earlier, this star-studded film recounts the events of the pivotal WWII battle in the South Pacific from both the American and Japanese points of view. Charlton Heston, Henry Fonda, James Coburn, Hal Holbrook, Glenn Ford, Toshiro Mifune, Robert Mitchum, Cliff Robertson, Robert Wagner, Monte Markham. (Ever aired on TCM? Yes! Last time in 2011)

 

Lipstick (Paramount, 1976) - Revenge-fantasy thriller starring the Hemmingway sisters. A fashion model (Margaux Hemmingway) takes the law into her own hands after her little sister's music teacher (Chris Sarandon) rapes her, gets found not guilty, then rapes the sister (Mariel Hemmingway). Also with Anne Bancroft. (Ever aired on TCM? No)

 

The Bingo Long Traveling All-Stars & Motor Kings (Universal, 1976) - Fed up with the working conditions of the Negro Leagues in the '30s, a charismatic pitcher (Billy Dee Williams) goes renegade and take his team on the road, barnstorming the small towns of the Midwest and challenging all-white teams. Also with James Earl Jones and Richard Pryor. (Ever aired on TCM? No)

 

I Love You, Alice B. Toklas (Warner Bros., 1968) - A square lawyer (Peter Sellers) pushing middle age and about to enter a marriage about which he's not particularly excited falls head over heels for a much younger hippie girl (Leigh Taylor-Young) and drops out of mainstream society. Also with Jo Van Fleet and Joyce Van Patten. (Ever aired on TCM? Yes! In fact, it's on the schedule in September)

 

St. Ives (Warner Bros., 1976) - A top LA burglar (John Houseman) discovers the plans for his next big heist have been stolen and hires a writer of crime novels (Charles Bronson) to negotiate their return. Also with Jacqueline Bissett, Maximilian Schell, Harris Yulin, Michael Lerner and Elisha Cook, Jr. (Ever aired on TCM? No)

 

Car Wash (Universal, 1976) - Largely plot-free look at an unusually eventful day at a car wash, fondly remembered for the title track and other great, funky '70s songs. Richard Pryor, George Carlin, Clarence Muse, Bill Duke and the Pointer Sisters as the Wilson Sisters. (Ever aired on TCM? Yes! But not since 2003)

 

Ode to Billy Joe (Warner Bros., 1976) - Set in rural Mississippi in the early '50s, this is the film that purports to answer the questions raised by insanely popular but lyrically vague 1968 country/pop crossover hit by Bobbie Gentry. The spelling of "Billie Joe" was changed for the movie, possibly to avoid any confusion about his gender? Robby Benson Glynnis O'Connor and James Best. (Ever aired on TCM? Makes its TCM premiere  on Tuesday!)

 

Blume in Love (Warner Bros., 1973) - A divorce lawyer (George Seagel) ironically watches his own marriage fall apart, though he's still desperately in love with his ex-wife (Susan Anspach). Written and directed by Paul Mazursky, who also plays a supporting role. Also with Kris Kristofferson, Marsha Mason and Shelly Winters. Man, I love the casts of '70s movies! (Ever aired on TCM? Yes, but not since 1998!)

 

Obsession (Columbia, 1976) - Cliff Robertson plays a wealthy New Orleans businessman whose wife and daughter are kidnapped, then killed during a bungled rescue attempt. Years later, while vacationing in Italy, he becomes obsessed with a woman (Genevieve Bujold) who's a dead ringer for his late (?) wife. Also with John Lithgow. (Ever aired on TCM? Yes! Last time in 2011)

 

Permission to Kill (Warner Bros., 1975) - Slow-burning spy movie shot entirely in Austria. The exiled leader of a pro-freedom political party in an unnamed country wants to return and overthrow the dictator but a Western government agent (Dirk Bogarde) is determined to prevent him from doing so until his superiors feel the time is more auspicious. Also with Ava Gardner and Timothy Dalton. (Ever aired on TCM? No)

 

The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea (Embassy, 1976) - Heavy British drama. Four years after losing her husband, a demure shopkeeper on a tiny coastal town (Sarah Miles) is ready to experience love again with an American sailor (Kris Kristofferson), but ther teenage son has joined a secret society of fascistic youths and, poisoned with their propaganda, plots to kill his potential new stepfather. (Ever aired on TCM? No)

 

Shadow of the Hawk (Columbia, 1976) - Horror film about the Westernized grandson (Jan Michael-Vincent) of a tribal shaman who returns to the wilderness to learn about his heritage. When he runs afoul of evil spirits, he enlists the help of a local tribe leader (Chief Dan George) to combat them. (Ever aired on TCM? No)

 

All the President's Men (Warner Bros., 1976) - Well, we all know this one. (Ever aired on TCM? Yes! Most recently October, 2016)

 

Harry and Walter Go to New York (Columbia, 1976) - Caper comedy set in the 1890s in which two hopelessly out-of-their-league con men (James Caan and Elliot Gould) aspire to pull off the biggest bank heist in history, making a mortal enemy of the world's greatest bank robber (Michael Caine) and winning the affection of a socially crusading female reporter (Diane Keaton). Also with Charles Durning and Lesley Anne Warren. (Ever aired on TCM? Yes! Last time in 2012)

 

The Man Who Fell to Earth (Cinema V, 1976) - The now-legendary cult film directed by Nicolas Roeg. Should be watched more the atmosphere and the acting than trying to make sense of the crazy, meandering plot, but okay, to try to summarize, it's about an alien (David Bowie) who comes to Earth to discover the secret of making water to save his endangered planet. Through a series of successful patents, he quickly becomes a zillionaire, but he also kind of transforms into bored, fat Elvis, used by everyone around him. With Rip Torn, Candy Clark and Buck Henry. (Ever aired on TCM? No)

 

Operation: Daybreak (Warner Bros, 1975) - Based on real events. A group of Czech commandos trained in England are sent to Prague to assassinate the head of Nazi security services, the "Butcher of Prague". Timothy Bottoms is the only cast member I'd ever heard of. (Ever aired on TCM? No)

 

Man Friday (Embassy, 1975) - The Robinson Crusoe story retold from a more modern perspective, with Peter O'Toole as Cruso and Richard Roundtree as Friday. In this version, it's Friday who's wiser, more perceptive and knowledgeable, while Crusoe can't move past his racist worldview. (Ever aired on TCM? No)

 

The Shootist (Paramount, 1976) - I don't need to give a plot description of John Wayne's last film, do I? Lauren Bacall, Ron Howard, James Stewart, Harry Morgan, John Carradine, Scatman Crothers. (Ever aired on TCM? Yes! Last time in 2014)

 

The Omen (20th Century Fox, 1976) - We all know this one. Gregory Peck, Lee Remick, David Warner (Ever aired on TCM? No)

 

Our Time (Warner Bros., 1974) - Coming-of-age drama set in the Massachusetts prep-school world of the mid-'50s. With Pamela Sue Martin and Parker Stevenson (soon to be Nancy Drew and Frank Hardy). (Ever aired on TCM? No)

 

Jury of One (Embassy, 1974) - Suspense thriller starring Sophia Loren. Originally in French, dubbed for HBO. I have no idea if Loren supplied her own English voice. Hopefully!  (Ever aired on TCM? No)

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Isn't it goofy that so many of these films, which were primetime stuff on HBO forty years ago, would be great for TCM Underground today. This is a trip down memory lane for me. I had forgotten all about Lipstick.

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I remember when we first got local cable in '75, with a first-one's-free month of HBO, when it was still relatively unknown and underground.  Practically memorized Return of the Pink Panther from being the feature that month.

 

Never mind the old 80's "HBO Movie" opening, would you believe theatrical movies on HBO used to be a "prestige" thing, and had a TCM-style host to do intros?

And showed the original theatrical trailers as filler promos?  (Looking up old trailers, I found that the trailers for Freebie & the Bean and Topol's Galileo had also been imprinted directly on my brain cortex.)

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I think I Love You, Alice B. Toklas had a memorable airing in 2014 as part of the Essentials series.  My recollection is that Drew Barrymore had selected the film and even though Robert was his typically gracious host, I got the impression that he didn't think this one really qualified.  (Despite the fact that Robert did love other Peter Sellers movies.)

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We didn't get HBO until the summer of 1979, so this program guide is a little before my viewing time. Getting the guide in the mail was a big deal every month, and we always kept it under a miniature grandfather's clock that stood on a mantle above the very rarely used fireplace (I'm from Texas. If we used the fireplace 10 times all winter, that was a lot). I think the day we got HBO, my mom sternly told my brother and I, "No rated R movies!", but the topic was never brought up again, and certainly all the first rated R movies I ever watched were on HBO, especially as I got a TV in my bedroom for either my 11th or 12th birthday. All my first celebrity nudity sightings, I owe to HBO. But I wouldn't want to say that was its only value! I was exposed to a lot of high-quality movies. There didn't seem too much crap on HBO in those early days. And like TCM now, I didn't have to sit through commercials every 20 minutes, like I did with the ABC Movie of the Week. Surely I owe a lot of my love of film to HBO.

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We didn't get HBO until the summer of 1979, so this program guide is a little before my viewing time. Getting the guide in the mail was a big deal every month, and we always kept it under a miniature grandfather's clock that stood on a mantle above the very rarely used fireplace (I'm from Texas. If we used the fireplace 10 times all winter, that was a lot). I think the day we got HBO, my mom sternly told my brother and I, "No rated R movies!", but the topic was never brought up again, and certainly all the first rated R movies I ever watched were on HBO, especially as I got a TV in my bedroom for either my 11th or 12th birthday. All my first celebrity nudity sightings, I owe to HBO. But I wouldn't want to say that was its only value! I was exposed to a lot of high-quality movies. There didn't seem too much crap on HBO in those early days. And like TCM now, I didn't have to sit through commercials every 20 minutes, like I did with the ABC Movie of the Week. Surely I owe a lot of my love of film to HBO.

 

Pardon me for commenting on grammar, but I would rather use a phrase like "movies rated R" instead of "rated R movies" and never ever use the "c" word you had used in the last sentence I had embolden.

 

(slowly posts message)

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certainly all the first rated R movies I ever watched were on HBO, especially as I got a TV in my bedroom for either my 11th or 12th birthday.

 

Ouch. Certainly progressive since MY days as a youngster-you had cable! 

 

Flashback to the dark ages: when my friends & I had a "sleepover" the old black & white television was wheeled into the kid's room for late night Godzilla movies. We thought we were princesses-our OWN TV for the night!

 

Funnily enough, I have a circa 1955 TV AND a 60's rolling TV stand up in my attic.

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Well, we didn't get cable in my area until '82, and shortly after it's instillation(the 3 tiered button box with a wire that reached across the room) a guy at work told me how to "bootleg" the rest of the premium channels( but you had to subscribe to at least one of them, and I chose TMC) with a rubber band and an "attachable" pencil eraser.  So in 1977 I had no idea either cable TV OR HBO even existed! 

 

 

Sepiatone

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The Next Man (Allied Artists, 1976) - Sean Connery plays an Arab diplomat (!), who becomes a target for multiple, competing assassination attempts after he invites Israel to join OPEC. Starring Connery and ... literally no one else you've ever heard of. (Ever aired on TCM? No)

 

 

I know that I have watched this movie once but I am sad to say that I do not recall any of the cast. I checked the cast listing on imdb.com and I in a way, sort-of, maybe a little recognized the name: Marco St. John. I do not recall him from any movie or program in his list of credits even although I have watched several of them.

 

I did note that he is credited with a role in: Cleopatra (1970). I have checked other sources but can find no listing for his actual performance. I can assume only that he dubbed a voice or two for the release in English. I find it sad that the English-language version is listed as lost. It is a wonderfully odd movie. It is not surreal but it does make a person wonder what the writers were smoking. I recommend it highly for any person who wishes to watch an animated historical quasi-pornographic war sci-fi comedy. It truly is the only movie of that type which I can recommend. 

 

Please Note: I have edited and re-edited the description: "animated historical quasi-pornographic war sci-fi comedy." many times and I am sad to say that I can find no arrangement which seems correct. I know the rules for order of precedence of adjectives in English but I am not able to properly apply them here. I will appreciate guidance and advice on this matter.

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