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mijiyoon38

Notes on: Vertigo *SPOILER ALERT

30 posts in this topic

 

The other issue I have with your post is your dismissal of "Vertigo defenders" as "obsessive", because it defuses any interest I might have for further discussion. If anything I bring to the table will be brushed aside by just saying I'm being "obsessive", then why bother? And if I weren't to stand up for a film I'm passionate about, then what are we doing here? Frankly, it is a dismissal of the mere nature of film discussion and forums as a whole.

 

Now, that's a rather blanket statement and a fairly absurd one at that.  My comment about "Vertigo" lovers being obsessive comes from experience and that goes way beyond the TCM Message Boards.  I find that when this particular film comes up in conversation its proponents will not even entertain the notion that "Vertigo" is anything but perfect. Frankly, I have never found a "Vertigo" aficionado who is not 100% sure that it is Hitchcock's best film and should be atop every Best Films list.  So, yep, from my rather large sampling over the years, I'd say "Vertigo" fans do tend to be a bit on the obsessive side.  Those of us find the film to be manipulative, overwrought and lacking in many, many ways, tend to keep our mouths shut for fear of eliciting the wrath (and it is considerable) of the zealous "Vertigo" fans.  Shoot me. I don't like the film for all of the reasons I have previously stated and consider it to be wildly overrated by its fans.

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Now, that's a rather blanket statement and a fairly absurd one at that.  My comment about "Vertigo" lovers being obsessive comes from experience and that goes way beyond the TCM Message Boards.  I find that when this particular film comes up in conversation its proponents will not even entertain the notion that "Vertigo" is anything but perfect. Frankly, I have never found a "Vertigo" aficionado who is not 100% sure that it is Hitchcock's best film and should be atop every Best Films list.  So, yep, from my rather large sampling over the years, I'd say "Vertigo" fans do tend to be a bit on the obsessive side.  Those of us find the film to be manipulative, overwrought and lacking in many, many ways, tend to keep our mouths shut for fear of eliciting the wrath (and it is considerable) of the zealous "Vertigo" fans.  Shoot me. I don't like the film for all of the reasons I have previously stated and consider it to be wildly overrated by its fans.

 

I haven't read all the replies here, but I don't think I've read any "wrath-filled" post from Vertigo fans  :lol:

 

Anyway, I'm a Vertigo fan, it is my favorite Hitchcock, but I don't think it is the best film out there and I don't think it is "perfect". So I might be an exception to your "rather large sampling", or it might just be not ALL Vertigo fans are "obsessed", "wrath-filled", or "zealous"  ;)

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Thief12:

 

Lighten up!  Let's agree to disagree on the subject of "Vertigo."

 

Lydecker

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Thief12:

 

Lighten up!  Let's agree to disagree on the subject of "Vertigo."

 

Lydecker

 

I'm not stressed, so there's no need to "lighten up". Just trying to engage in a discussion about the film. Cheers.

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Even though Vertigo is not my favorite Hitchcock film, I decided to read the book on which it was based: Sueurs froides. The title translates to Cold Sweat, but I think you can find in English as From Among the Dead.

 

What a great read. I recommend it wholeheartedly. The main character in the novel is Flavières, and he is a much more interesting character than Scottie Ferguson in Vertigo. The first part takes place around the time of the occupation of Paris in World War II; the second part takes place about four years later.

 

In fact, the novel is more of a noir story: rather dark, full of wartime and postwar angst. I wonder what the result would have been if Hitchcock stayed true to the narrative.

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