Dr. Rich Edwards

Daily Dose #16: It's a Nice Face (Scene from North by Northwest)

197 posts in this topic

Even at the level of the dialogue, this film is playing with the idea that two Hollywood stars are flirting with each other (e.g. the line, "I look vaguely familiar.") How does our pre-existing knowledge of these stars function to create meaning in this scene. 

 

Hitch used two of the most beautiful and handsome stars of the time in the film. So it appeared rather easy for Eva Marie Saint and Cary Grant to form some type of chemistry working together. Everything seemed to flow as if it just came naturally to them both. 

 

There is minimal action in this scene, so any deviation from the overall pattern of focusing on the faces of the two leads will have increased significance. In that sense, discuss how Hitchcock uses the R.O.T. matchbook as an important piece of acting business (or as a prop) in this scene. 

 

I think the matchbook is used somewhat as a distraction from the obvious (at least to Eve Kendall) sexual tension and chemistry between the two. While Roger seems a little less sure of himself at the time, which is he says the "O" means nothing and that he says rot instead of his initials. 

 

How is Hitchcock using sound design in this scene? Consider music and other background sounds in your answer. 

 

This was hard for me to really answer as I was too caught up in the tension and dialogue of Eve and Roger. But I would imagine that it to be a somewhat relaxed music that made the setting more comfortable for all involved.

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Even at the level of the dialogue, this film is playing with the idea that two Hollywood stars are flirting with each other (e.g. the line, "I look vaguely familiar.") How does our pre-existing knowledge of these stars function to create meaning in this scene. 
 
It immediately creates an atmosphere of sex, romance and intrigue. Grant of course was seen as a suave Hollywood playboy so it fit right in with the character.
 
There is minimal action in this scene, so any deviation from the overall pattern of focusing on the faces of the two leads will have increased significance. In that sense, discuss how Hitchcock uses the R.O.T. matchbook as an important piece of acting business (or as a prop) in this scene. 
 
Since we are in a closed area, it is interesting to me how the scene works so well. Eve mostly looks directly into Roger's eyes, even when he has his sunglasses on. The sunglasses gives us a hint right away that he might be hiding something. The matches were a great focus because it gave us some humor as to the word "ROT".
 
One thing that also stood out to me in this scene was actually a continuity issue. When Roger holds his drink in his left hand (1:38) we are looking from behind, the next second we cut to the front of him and the glass is on the table and his hands are folded (1:39). This also occurred a few seconds early at 1:33 and 1:34.  

1-38.jpg
 
1-39.jpg
 
How is Hitchcock using sound design in this scene? Consider music and other background sounds in your answer. 
 
The sound design was very effective in this scene. The music was barely a factor, actually had to listen closely to see if there was any. I could hear soft and faint violins toward the end of the scene which added to the feeling of "romance". The sound of the train, some glasses and plates as well as the match all created an intimate setting which I think worked very well for the scene.
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I don’t know if anyone has mentioned this

 

I was just watching TCM and heard Ben mention David O Selznick and thought Wow! that’s what the O stood for in R.O.T. It was a dig at David O Selznick. It meant nothing (like he was calling Selznick a nothing)....and besides that, it was rot.

 

Maybe I’m overthinking and overtired...but Hitch loved those in jokes...so maybe.

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All I can really add is how my mother and her generation could not wait for Saturday Matinee's. She was 15 during this release and being part of the film audience was Americas favorite pastime along with baseball. This is how I came to love TCM. The Stars of Hollywood were the most talked about subject and she could not wait to see the worlds favorite movie stars paired together on the big screen. This was a big one!!!! It was like Beatlemania. Eyes glued to the screen to feel the chemistry and daydream until Hollywood produced the next dreamy couple.

 

The simplicity of the scene is mesmerizing. Pure Hollywood sex appeal. Love it! Back in the day, men lit a women's cigarette with matches it was a gesture of interest as the dialog definitely progressed to this being the next step. They play back and forth with ROT having actual meaning it's obvious he is being witty for attraction to her with his declaration on what it means to him now he's in this mess.

 

The sound design is blended perfectly for the overall focus on the characters. This is a Hollywood hot moment in close quarters, timing is everything. Hitchcock knows what grabs his audience and even today it is timeless. Oh how I wish some of this world still existed. Thank goodness for the TCM family. Great comments this week xo

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Ever since discovering vintage glamour I have always tried to mimic the sophistication of yesteryear.

 

Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint simply ooze sophistication in this scene. Both were known for unique roles and Hitch knew what he was doing when he selected these two for North by Northwest. Cary Grant was known for charming women, and Eva looks like she's thoroughly enjoying herself in this scene.

 

The matchbook seems to be a tool of seduction. This was indeed an era when a gentleman would always light a lady's cigarette. The way Eva takes Roger's hand and pulls it towards her to light her cigarette and then blow out the match shows she has a way of getting what she wants and may pose a bit of a challenge to him later.

 

We only hear hints of music in the background, along with sounds of the train and the diner car, allowing us to focus on the conversation between the two.

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  • Even at the level of the dialogue, this film is playing with the idea that two Hollywood stars are flirting with each other (e.g. the line, "I look vaguely familiar.") How does our pre-existing knowledge of these stars function to create meaning in this scene. 

 

Cary is just smooth as glass and this role fits him like a glove.  He has to be exhausted, scared and hungry, but not too tired for "a long night on the train" with Eva Marie.  Eva Marie changed from her previous roles to be sexier, calmer, more demure, powerful, uninhibited.  This scene at dinner is quite sensual and playful.  

 

There is minimal action in this scene, so any deviation from the overall pattern of focusing on the faces of the two leads will have increased significance. In that sense, discuss how Hitchcock uses the R.O.T. matchbook as an important piece of acting business (or as a prop) in this scene. 

 

The sexual attraction of their looks is quite strong and truly seems real and not just for the film.  The lighting of the cigarette is to me like foreplay of sorts as it allows them to physically touch each other for the first time.  Her pulling his hand back towards her after the cigarette is light tells him she likes to be in control and she is not afraid of him, even if he is wanted for murder.  I imagine he wants to forget the brook trout and get out of the dining car ...quickly.  He would definitely believe his bad luck is changing.  It is weird to me that he has personalized paper matches.  If he is classy like his cool suit and glasses, why not have a metal lighter with "R.O.T." on that ...why paper matches as they didn't fit with his overall cool.  

 

How is Hitchcock using sound design in this scene? Consider music and other background sounds in your answer. 

 

The music to me is there, but not obvious, the non-verbal sexually is the most important with the words second and the music a distance third.  Even the scenes from the window are subtle telling us the sun is going down and the day is ending outside, but just starting inside. 

 

 

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1.  The role is perfect for Cary Grant.  He had played the same type of roll throughout his career - but to me it seemed fresh and new each time.  I never tired of seeing him in movies.  His comedic roles were wonderful.  The humor in this movie seems more sophisticated and it works perfectly.  I haven't seen a lot of Miss Saint's movies but in the ones I have seen, her characters didn't come across as polished and as classy as her Miss Kendall.  Grace Kelly has always come to mind as the epitome of class and glamour, but Eva Marie Saint holds her own in North by Northwest.

 

2.  The way that the camera closed in on the matchbook cover and with the two main characters mention of it in conversation put a red circle around it as it plays an important role later on in the movie. 

 

3.  The music in the scene is romantic in tone but it's not a key feature in the scene - the conversation between the main characters is.  The noise of the train moving over the tracks is a bit more prominent than the background music, but again is secondary to the music.  You hardly notice the music at all but you do notice the background rhythm of the train moving down the tracks.

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  1. Even at the level of the dialogue, this film is playing with the idea that two Hollywood stars are flirting with each other (e.g. the Thornhill/Grant line, "I look vaguely familiar.") How does our pre-existing knowledge of these stars function to create meaning in this scene. 

          The scene begins with a double entendre, Hitch's joke that the audience can enjoy and participate in as well as the actors, to put everyone at ease and make the audience feel they are in the movie with the couple on screen. Since Grant is such a big star he is easily recognizable and it plays well with his character, Roger Thornhill, who is a man wanted for  murder; a marked or recognizable man, since his photo is in the newspapers.                                                                                                      

  2. There is minimal action in this scene, so any deviation from the overall pattern of focusing on the faces of the two leads will have increased significance. In that sense, discuss how Hitchcock uses the R.O.T. matchbook as an important piece of acting business (or as a prop) in this scene.                                                                                             Hitch is using this scene to introduce us to a very important prop that connects Grant (Thornhill) to this object, a personalized matchbook (his trademark) with the initial "R.O.T." This will become a unique and powerful tool of covert communication in the climax of the film. It is a gimmick that works brilliantly to help keep the fast-pace moments of the final scenes from bogging down or losing their "pinch", while padding itself on the back for it's simplistic elegance. Most ingenious.                                                                                                                                                                                                 
  3. How is Hitchcock using sound design in this scene? Consider music and other background sounds in your answer.                                                                                                                                                                                           The musical score is once again effectively echoing the tone of the scene, playful and a bit mysterious, as the two people meet for the first time and use their "inside joke" to set the mood of playfulness as the two characters do a dance of flirtatious introduction and discovery.
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DAILY DOSE #16 (NXNW).

 

ENTERTAINERS ON A TRAIN:

1. Because they're recognized as Hollywood stars, we know they're attractive and have loose morals.

2. Where there's a flame, there's fire.

3. The background music is melodramatic but the witty repartee undercuts its sentimentality.

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1.Even at the level of the dialogue, this film is playing with the idea that two Hollywood stars are flirting with each other (e.g. the line, "I look vaguely familiar.") How does our pre-existing knowledge of these stars function to create meaning in this scene. 

Cary and Eva are two very classy actors. There's a lot of sexual attraction toward each other and that makes this scene so HOT!!!!
 
2. There is minimal action in this scene, so any deviation from the overall pattern of focusing on the faces of the two leads will have increased significance. In that sense, discuss how Hitchcock uses the R.O.T. matchbook as an important piece of acting business (or as a prop) in this scene.
 
Its a prop, I honestly think that the matchbook and the lit match represent the flames between these two. 
 
3. How is Hitchcock using sound design in this scene? Consider music and other background sounds in your answer.
 
We can hear the train, we can see the phone poles and the music set up a romantic dinner. 

 

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Even at the level of the dialogue, this film is playing with the idea that two Hollywood stars are flirting with each other (e.g. the Thornhill/Grant line, "I look vaguely familiar.") How does our pre-existing knowledge of these stars function to create meaning in this scene. 

 

Any less elegant couple playing at this level of carnal innuendo would border on porn.

 

There is minimal action in this scene, so any deviation from the overall pattern of focusing on the faces of the two leads will have increased significance. In that sense, discuss how Hitchcock uses the R.O.T. matchbook as an important piece of acting business (or as a prop) in this scene.

 

The use of a matchbook rather than a lighter in this scene introduces suggestive physical contact. Eve creates sexual tension by steadying Roger's hand as her cigarette is ignited and then draws his hand back toward her lips so she may extinguish the match just as it burns dangerously close to his fingers. Hot stuff. Incidentally, one definition of "rot" in British dictionaries is "to become or cause to become morally corrupt or degenerate". Hitch is having a little fun.

 

How is Hitchcock using sound design in this scene? Consider music and other background sounds in your answer. 

 

The music is soft, nondescript, and deep in the background, just as it might be in any elevator of the day. The clicking of train wheels running over joints in the tracks is predictable and soothing in its repetitiveness. It all provides a bit of cushion for the clever dialogue. 

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1. Even at the level of the dialogue, this film is playing with the idea that two Hollywood stars are flirting with each other (e.g. the line, "I look vaguely familiar.") 

 

Till this question I’d never considered the idea this was an “in” joke playing off Grant’s and Saint’s fame as movie stars. I always thought of this as a way of Grant’s character referring to his notoriety from being pursued and an attempt on his part to determine wether Saint’s character recognizes him from newspapers as the UN killer.

 

1b. How does our pre-existing knowledge of these stars function to create meaning in this scene. 

 

For me, it’s Cary Grant being Roger Thornhill. Noted for being suave he’s playing the character perfectly. I didn’t really see him as playing Cary Grant. I wasn’t that familiar with Eva Marie Saint with the result that she seemed the iconic Hitchcock blonde more than a Hollywood movie star.

 

2. There is minimal action in this scene, so any deviation from the overall pattern of focusing on the faces of the two leads will have increased significance. In that sense, discuss how Hitchcock uses the R.O.T. matchbook as an important piece of acting business (or as a prop) in this scene. 

 

I’ve always thought the matchbook was an attempt by Grant’s character at self-depracating  humor. However, as jfedelchak points out in his post on this forum: “This will become a unique and powerful tool of covert communication in the climax of the film.”

 

3. How is Hitchcock using sound design in this scene? Consider music and other background sounds in your answer. 

 

This is the 1st time, due to question #1, I’ve considered this scene as “playing with the idea that two Hollywood stars are flirting with each other”. In the 1st 2/3s of the scene the sound of the train tracks and canned music in the dining car might be Hitchcock’s way of providing a bit of “realism” keeping in the viewers mind that we are also watching a story, not just two Hollywood stars flirting. Then around the 2/3s mark the canned muzak, written by Bernard Herrmann, goes away to  be replaced by Herrmann’s movie score theme used to indicate the love story between Kay and Roger. As if Hitchcock is saying ok, fun joke is over, back to the story. The sound of the train tracks acting as a bridge of continuity.

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I like the way Hitchcock uses the level of closeups to build intimacy between the two characters in this scene. To begin, we switch back and forth from shots of Thornhill to shots of Kendall at a comfortable distance, taking in the table top before them. Once she reveals that she has tipped the waiter to seat him with her, the camera moves into medium closeups of the actors, from the shoulders up. The position changes once more after the closeup of the matchbook reading "R.O.T.," Thornhill's initials, he says. At this point, we no longer see Eve Kendall from the front. We see her from the side, framed to the right, with an empty distance leading off to Thornhill who is off-screen. The different angle, showing only one side of her face as she fixates on the matchbook, clues the audience in visually to the fact that she is not completely who she claims to be either. After the closeups with the two build a rapport, we now see that the distance of a mystery still lies between them.

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1. I don't know if they had a relationship off camera, but their chemistry on camera is very obvious, he's Cary Grant, you don't get more suave or manly, he's the perfect hollywood leading man, and a natural, we believe he's Roger O. Thornhill, it's like putting on an old suit, he just fits. Eva Marie Saint is also perfect in her roll (not sure I believe she's 26, but still). I don't know much about her hollywood life, but between her voice and those eyes, she is Eve Kendall. The banter just flows between them, as if they already know what the other is going to say, which maybe isn't real life, but it's why we watch movies, they can meet, fall in love, and become Mr. and Mrs. Thornhill in a few short days, and we're rooting for it to happen.

2. The matchbook becomes important later on, so it had to be introduced, as not only a matchbook, but specifically his matchbook. The fact that his initials are R.O.T. is a bonus, his trademark (now we all wish we had something that cool). It also brings them together physically, something that might otherwise be awkward, hollywood is fast, but they can't just start holding hands. It also allows them to insinuate some things without just coming out and saying them. I've seen this movie dozens of times, and until I started writing this, I don't think I fully grasped the importance of the matchbook's role, clever!

3. Train noises are soothing and they keep a certain rhythm, as does the scenery passing by, and there is definitely a glamour to train travel on the 20th Century Limited, I want to be on that train! The colors (via vistaVision) are stunning, it helps date the film (along with the costumes), not that it's "dated", but you know when it occurs because everything is at it's peak, the green lenses in Cary Grant's sun glasses for example, so chic and modern. Even the food, the brook trout, could you still order that on a train today?, probably not, but it's the perfect meal for their first dinner together (even if it's a little trouty). My favorite part is when she immediately corrects him and tells him who he really is (oops), it's done with confidence and so matter of factly, and I believe that gives her the upper hand right away, as if being a seductive woman isn't enough. I absolutely love this movie, and this is one of my favorite scenes!!

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Even at the level of the dialogue, this film is playing with the idea that two Hollywood stars are flirting with each other (e.g. the line, "I look vaguely familiar.") How does our pre-existing knowledge of these stars function to create meaning in this scene.

 

I think they are making fun of their stardom with lines like " it's something about my face" and " it's a nice face". Then there is the jab at acting in general, " you're not honest with them". Cary Grant has obviously met his prowess match in Kendall. She makes the advances here. Very funny, romantic, and clever all in one scene.

 

There is minimal action in this scene, so any deviation from the overall pattern of focusing on the faces of the two leads will have increased significance. In that sense, discuss how Hitchcock uses the R.O.T. matchbook as an important piece of acting business (or as a prop) in this scene.

 

Without the matchbook, he couldn't light her cigarette and she couldn't touch his hands so lovingly and sexily blow out the flame. Is she teasing him, or leading him on, the viewer wonders. Also, the initials are ROT. Rot, meaning to decay. Significant? I think so. I don't think he was just given any 3 letters.

 

How is Hitchcock using sound design in this scene? Consider music and other background sounds in your answer.

 

The music is very romantic, like at a nice restaurant where people in love would dine. Hitch has the lulling train sounds of it going over the tracks, and the occasional whistle, but it is not over powering. The sounds are kept minimal here as you must concentrate on the dialogue, since there is no action in this scene. I think he did that on purpose, so as not to drown out the dialogue.

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1) Our pre-existing knowledge of Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint creates meaning in this scene by reminding us that the insinuations and vagueness were typically of their character types when flirting. They were not the type to explicitly state anything, which I think adds to the sensual feeling of scenes like this, in addition to being a lure and drawing someone in.

 

2) It seems that the R.O.T. matchbook was used to create wonder in the mind of Eve Kendall. She seems intrigued at the fact that there could be more to Roger Thornhill than meets the eyes, which followed the exchange that the matchbook created. I find it interesting that something as simple as a matchbook could create such complexity in the mind of a character.

 

3) The sound design, in this scene, is quite delicate and simple. All that is heard is the train against the tracks and a light violin. I feel this addition of the violin shows us by sound the connection and flirtatiousness that Thornhill and Kendall are exhibiting visually on screen, which magnifies the attraction and emphasizes the importance of it to the storyline of the movie.

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Our pre-existing knowledge of these stars does have an affect on how we interpret his/her performance. We know Cary Grant is a leading man and ladies fall in love with him. Eve Saint Marie is also a leading lady who also attracts attention for her beauty and wisdom. 

 

I feel the R.O.T. matchbook is yes to detract from the two stars. Its a break from the intense scene playing out between the two. Its also a reminder that this is going on between them, this unfinished business of his identity and as he strikes the flame, the heat goes up not only in his quest for innocence but also their attraction for one another.

 

Sound design is priceless. We have the silly violins in the background, music for love. I use the word silly as this is all about lust. Then we have the background noise to remind us we are still on the train and what is particular amusing to me is the view through the window as the scene unfolds. Its rather ugly and bleak and here we have an attraction progressing.

 

I have to say she is rather fake to me. The whole scene is out of whack for me. I never felt, nor still do, that Eve Saint Marie was the right woman here for Cary Grant. It just never worked for me. I always feel very uncomfortable watching this scene. Perhaps that is what Hitchcock wanted.

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1) Mr. Hitchcock was using the knowledge that both of the Stars and the audience know that the description of Roger was also describing the actor Cary Grant. The Hitchcock Obsession with twins and lookalikes is teased here.

2) The sexual tension on the screen is fierce and the business with matchbook, the clenching of two beautifully manicured hands (take another look at how nice Mr. Grant's nails have been shaped and polished!) and the blowing out of the match was sex in miniature. And it all got past the censors!

3) I watched the clip four times and there is light romantic music unscoring the scene, click-clack noises of the train and some dining car clinking of silverware but other than that I remain nonplussed; I heard nothing unusual and now I am afraid that I might have missed something...did I?

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1.      This is a tough question, because I’m not sure if the “pre-existing knowledge of these stars” applies to a 2017 viewing or to 1959 audiences. In both cases, Cary Grant would be known as a handsome, witty movie star, but Eva Marie Saint was not known for glamorous roles at the time. Also, a 1959 audience would have been more surprised to see such forward sexual advances made by a woman on screen where that’s not as surprising in 2017 films. Watching Cary Grant in this scene, we expect him to be the sexual aggressor, but we see his surprise at both her knowledge of how he is (“Whoops”) and how she bargains with sex.

2.      The close-ups on the matchbook are among the only time we deviate from their faces. This focus will pay off later at Vandamm’s house when Roger drops it to warn Eve that they know of her deception. And his lighting of her cigarette becomes foreplay in the elegant handling of these two actors.

3.      The fast but quiet rumble of the train gives a sense that the story is racing along. The music through most of it is gentle “courting” music with clarinets and violins prominent. The actors’ voices are certainly the focus of the sound design.

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Good afternoon...

1. "I look vaguely familiar" is a line that brings home "yes, as a matter of fact, you look VERY familiar; you both do!"Cary and Eva are two actors whose faces the audience knows very well, maybe Cary more so than Eva, bit this line is funny and invites the audience in on the joke. "Of course, we know who you are, Cary, Eva!" Also, it ties into Eva's answer later on when she calls him out on the lie of who is really is in the picture.

2. The matchbook with Roger's initials is a tool Eve uses to cement her seduction of Roger. When he lights her cigarette, she takes hold if his hand and when he draws it away, she stops him and pulls it closer and blows out the flame- shades of things to come back in the room.

3. The music is soft and low, you can hear the glasses clang as they are put on the table and of course, the train as it moves along the tracks. There are points where the familiar "love theme" ( the sound of violins raise up) and you get the feeling that the characters are really bonding and the anticipation of them getting together is strong.

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I have to say she is rather fake to me. The whole scene is out of whack for me. I never felt, nor still do, that Eve Saint Marie was the right woman here for Cary Grant. It just never worked for me. I always feel very uncomfortable watching this scene. Perhaps that is what Hitchcock wanted.

I think Hitch was always looking to further the point (characterization) of his characters. Without giving spoilers away your point should come to fruition at a later time in the movie...

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1.    Even at the level of the dialogue, this film is playing with the idea that two Hollywood stars are flirting with each other (e.g. the line, "I look vaguely familiar.") How does our pre-existing knowledge of these stars function to create meaning in this scene. 

 

 

Being aware of Cary’s reputation and previous roles which he played, Cary creates a character which is very close to his own self; debonair, controlled, well dressed, so he is playing a type-cast character which fits and provides his ordinary character with a controlled debonair attitude while being put in a unpredictable action-packed puzzling situation.  Eva Marie, who has played roles that were a bit more ‘innocent’ has to play a more controlled in-charge, sensual woman keeping her eye on Cary and keeping her movements to a limit so it looks like she is in control of their relationship, meetings and planning their future situations.

 

2.    There is minimal action in this scene, so any deviation from the overall pattern of focusing on the faces of the two leads will have increased significance. In that sense, discuss how Hitchcock uses the R.O.T. matchbook as an important piece of acting business (or as a prop) in this scene. 

 

The matchbook is used to remind us and confirm to Eva Marie that for the time being Cary remains to be Roger Thornhill which helps the movie continue on as we wait to see what Eva Marie’s proposition will be to Roger Thornhill.  After all, the proposition is for Roger Thornhill, not a Jack Phillips. By the way, Hitchcock must like the sound of THOR in his characters’ names…Thorwald, Thornhill.

 

 

3.    How is Hitchcock using sound design in this scene? Consider music and other background sounds in your answer.

 

The slow melodic music moves quietly over the conversation so not to distract the flirtation discussion between the two characters.  Also, I like how the music is quiet enough where sometimes you can hear the dishes clinking and the sound of the train humming and hitting the tracks to remind us the characters are on a train.  The horn comes in just in time and adds to set up the sultry-blowing-out-the-match scene.

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1.    Even at the level of the dialogue, this film is playing with the idea that two Hollywood stars are flirting with each other (e.g. the line, "I look vaguely familiar.") How does our pre-existing knowledge of these stars function to create meaning in this scene.

            Do not understand the question.

 

2.    There is minimal action in this scene, so any deviation from the overall pattern of focusing on the faces of the two leads will have increased significance. In that sense, discuss how Hitchcock uses the R.O.T. matchbook as an important piece of acting business (or as a prop) in this scene.

             It confirms the identity of the male actor as Thornhill

 

3.    How is Hitchcock using sound design in this scene? Consider music and other background sounds in your answer. 

Music is relaxing as the train rambles forward. This is an indication of the chemistry between the two characters who seem to be headed toward a common destination.

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North by Northwest (1959) Assault by bourbon and the ensuing drunk driving scene in Laura's Mercedes.  An excellent example of Cary Grant playing an inebriated, innocent, victim in a serious predicament (about to be killed), so serious there are moments of humor in this well edited chase.

 

 <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/IlY5kaZC2N0?list=PLBMXypKe8j52w3wlUoJx8fEizP3-7EF8L" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

In contrast to Malcolm McDowell and his droogs in a stolen Durango 95 playing "Hogs of the Road" in A Clockwork Orange (1971).  Lots of similarities yet I think Roger Thornhill caused more damage.

 

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0zmE4o2bnsg?list=PLBMXypKe8j52w3wlUoJx8fEizP3-7EF8L" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Couldn’t open the second link for some reason! Darn

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