Dr. Rich Edwards

Daily Dose #18: Love Birds (Opening Scene of The Birds)

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The trope of the love birds and the flirting between Melanie and Mitch, particularly when Mitch attempts to stump Melanie with the ornithological and molting comments, establish the attraction between the two characters.  Interestingly, Melanie’s assertion that they cannot simply let the birds go in response to Mitch’s dig about caged birds sets up, as the professors note, a microcosm of the film: the birds do indeed get loose and enact revenge upon their captors.


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In what ways does this opening scene seem more appropriate to a romantic comedy than a “horror of the apocalypse” film? What do we learn about Melanie (Tippi Hedren) and Mitch (Rod Taylor) in this scene?

 

It feels more like a romantic comedy because of the early chemistry between Mitch and Melanie. She pretends to know all about the birds so that she can talk with Mitch. 

 

How does Hitchcock use sound design in this opening sequence? For example, how are the sounds of birds used to create a particular mood and atmosphere?

 

The flocks of birds circling around outside the shop seem to feel that a storm is brewing, whether it be a real and physical storm or one of a different nature. 

 

The opening scene contains a famous Hitchcock cameo. Describe the cameo and if you think it has any particular meaning in relation to this scene.

 

First of all, I always enjoy looking for the Hitchcock cameos in his films. I'm not sure that it really has any significance to the scene, though I thoroughly enjoyed those adorable little pups. 

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In what ways does this opening scene seem more appropriate to a romantic comedy than a “horror of the apocalypse” film? What do we learn about Melanie (Tippi Hedren) and Mitch (Rod Taylor) in this scene?

 

The scene seems more appropriate to a romantic comedy because Mitch initially mistakes Melanie for a salesperson and she decides to play along because he's a handsome man. People making assumptions about other people are a hallmark of romantic comedies. We learn that she doesn't know that much about birds but he does. I don't he realizes how flirty his remarks are.

 

How does Hitchcock use sound design in this opening sequence? For example, how are the sounds of birds used to create a particular mood and atmosphere?

 

Melanie is walking down a busy city street and we hear birds and footsteps. There is no way this would happen in real life; the noises from the cars should have drowned out the other noises. But, in order for Melanie to notice the birds overhead, she had to be able to hear them, so Hitchcock removed most of the city street noise (you hear the motorcycle but not much else related to the traffic). He also threw in a whistle from a boy on a bike. Inside the pet shop, there are dozens of birds, so bird sounds are mostly heard. There's a few squawks, but mostly the birds are pleasant sounding. I think he used the sounds to create a calm, unsuspecting atmosphere.

 

The opening scene contains a famous Hitchcock cameo. Describe the cameo and if you think it has any particular meaning in relation to this scene.

 

Hitchcock walks out of a pet store with two dogs on a leash. I don't think it has any particular meaning to the scene; I think he just wanted to get his cameo out of the way early in the film.

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1) It's a sunny afternoon with a very pretty blonde and it takes place in a pet store...nothing very horrifying in that.

While we have yet to learn their names they do "meet cute" and we don't know if they are strangers getting to know each other or if they are an established couple flirting to be cute with one another.

2) The squawking of the birds, for me, is nothing. Just background noise. I have never seen "The Birds" and so I am not expecting the cacophony to necessarily be significant. However, since the picture is entitled "The Birds", their cawing should portend danger is at hand.

3) Mr. Hitchcock is seen walking out of the pet store with two dogs. I think that it is simply his finding another amusing way to make a cameo. (If you freeze the scene at 00:35 you will notice the one dog looks directly into the camera completely ruining the take. He never worked in motion pictures ever again.)

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1. In what ways does this opening scene seem more appropriate to a romantic comedy than a “horror of the apocalypse” film? What do we learn about Melanie (Tippi Hedren) and Mitch (Rod Taylor) through their interactions in this scene?
      The is the comedic Hitchcock making  us feel at ease; the calm before the storm, to relax us before he springs his trap. Melanie and Mitch are flirting with one another using double entendre of "bird" chatter (the discussion of birds) as a thinly disguised way to talk about sex. A nice way to work around the sensors and give the audience a laugh. Killing two birds with one stone ...(I know, I'm sorry.) 

 

2.     How does Hitchcock use sound design in this opening sequence? For example, how are the sounds of birds used to create a particular mood and atmosphere?
         The bird sounds are creepy, foreshadowing things to come. The flapping and cawing indicate the birds are unset or angry or at the very least seem unfriendly and on guard. We want to know why? But in full MacGuffin-mode, we never will. 

 

3.     The opening scene contains a famous Hitchcock cameo. Describe the cameo and if you think it has any particular meaning in relation to this scene.

         Well, with his two dogs, the use of doubles will most likely be "in force", just as in Shadow of a Doubt there will be a lot of double-meaning and word-play, so we are alerted to pay attention, the (Hitchcock) game is afoot. 

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Not sure I agree there is no explanation for the bird attack. The love birds are caged. Mitch refers to them as "poor little innocent creatures caged up like this". Later, as the ornithologist is defending them with "birds are not aggressive" the waitress yells out that the "fried chicken is ready". I've always thought of this as a retribution movie. Isn't it birds fighting back? When I first saw this at age 10, I remember being certain that the birds would stop attacking if only the love birds were set free from their cage.

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1.The scene opens with two people meeting each other and flirting while talking about lovebirds, denoting they too may become a pair of lovebirds in the film. There is nothing frightening in this opening scene that would make you think there is big trouble on the way. Melanie was concerned about the birds outside, but once she enters the pet store she is more concerned about picking up her myna bird.

 

We learn from the scene that Melanie is picking up a myna bird that has not come in. She is curious about the birds gathering outside. She goes along with the ruse when Mitch mistakes her for an employee of the pet store. She continues to flirt with him and we see she can think quick on her feet as she tries to help Mitch pick out the two lovebirds. Mitch mistakes Melanie for an employee and is enjoying flirting with her as he questions her about the birds. We start to see a romance begin the two of them.

 

2. The bird sounds used instead of a musical score sets the mood that the birds are a major part of this film. They draw the attention of Melanie as she enters the pet store. The  sounds of the birds inside the store continue the theme that birds are an important part of this film. Even though it is a pet store, the birds seem to stand out more because there are so many of them in the store. Which foreshadows the gathering of a great many birds in the movie. Here in the pet store they are caged and are not a threat. But the ones gathering outside are noisy and denote the danger that is to come later.

 

3. The cameo of Hitchcock leaving the pet store with two dogs is lighthearted and continues his theme of doubles used in many of his films. The fact that they are his dogs makes it even more endearing. It also sets of the them of twosomes. Melanie and Mitch as a couple, his wanting two lovebirds for his sister, etc.  

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1.    In what ways does this opening scene seem more appropriate to a romantic comedy than a “horror of the apocalypse” film? What do we learn about Melanie (Tippi Hedren) and Mitch (Rod Taylor) in this scene?

The most obvious answer is the flirtation between Melanie and Mitch in the pet store, as Melanie pretends to work there.  It is very suggestive and flirtatious, far from scary.

We learn that Melanie is highbrow and upper crust.  Who can walk so elegantly in stilettos and a superbly tailored suit across a busy street in a major city? And what about that fabulous handbag?  I can never stop myself from noticing it J  

And what about her coat?  ...even the birds are critics....

 

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The opening scene of Hitchcock's Birds definitely establishes a calm and romantic tone. However, the sound design of birds does make the motif of apocalypse linger on through the dialogue. I think it was smart for Hitchcock to not include a ordinary music score, I think the sound of birds itself gives the sole terrifying feel of attack and horror.

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1. The Pacing, the setting and the interaction between Tippi Hedren’s characterization of Melanie and Rod Taylor’s characterization of Mitch almost seems like a romantic film (i'm thinking of Ross Hunter's romantic films for Universal) instead of an Alfred Hitchcock thriller (in term of the opening of “The Birds”).  From the introductory scene in the pet shop, we learn about that both Melanie and Mitch are interested in birds (especially for Rod Taylor’s “Mitch,” where he is interested in lovebirds).  This is how the two begin their romantic relationship.

 

2. You can easily hear the birds chirping outside and shortly before Tippi Hedren’s character walks into the pet shop, she sees the big flock of birds up in the sky, possibly sensing that some sort of danger will occur later in the film.  The birds in the pet shop are chirping frantically (usually in the scene with Tippi and Rod).  I think the sound design of bird chirping SFX and the electronic “synthesized” birds (on the Trautonium device) with Remi Gassman and Oskar Sala would add a dramatic (and somewhat “eerie”) effect to Hitchcock’s film (as an enhancement).

 

3. Hitchcock’s cameo with his pet canine terriers (Geoffrey and Stanley) in “The Birds” may send a message to the audience that he didn’t get a pet bird from the pet shop, possibly sensing/predicting that a dangerous effect will take place later in the film.  Many moons ago, I recall that Hitchcock’s “Birds” cameo was parodied in an episode of “The Simpsons” (“A Streetcar Named Marge” from 1992, after a “Birds” homage scene).  

 

Extra: Speaking of Hitchcock, Universal Studios/MCA and horror films (many of us classic/cult film fans know that horror films would be the “house style” of many vintage Universal Studios productions over the years):

 

I wonder why Hitchcock (with his own "touch") never directed a Universal “monster” feature film (Dracula, Frankenstein’s monster, The Mummy, The Wolf Man, The Creature From The Black Lagoon, etc.) during his time at the studio in the latter part of his career?  That would have been interesting (if he did).

 

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What interests me is how quickly people meet and fall in love in Hitchcock movies.  It is always fast, but this is like a speed train, if they aren't playing and really don't know each other.  A warning for women not to go to rural California with a man you just met.  No wonder Suzanne Plushette's character seemed so hostile.

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The film definitely has a boy meets girl feel, the only threat is a possible storm moving in hence the gulls moving inland, seems normal. Melanie is quite forward in assuming role as if she had birding skills, Mitch corrects her and begins playfully quizzing her. It's lighthearted. Melanie is looking for companionship as she purchased a bird and asked if it could already speak and took the role as employee to interact with Mitch. She's prompt arriving exactly on time and walks like a woman on a mission. Mitch seems more layed back, someone who plays along fueling the flirtatious encounter, and looking for love birds so must be a bit romantic.

 

The sound design is loud to me. The birds chattering and more chatter. It's peculiar and unsettling. I've not seen this film, so I found it a bit offensive almost annoying. With this being said, all the love bird talk with the chirping etc really sets the mood on edge, focused on birds as a character, chaos to be honest. These birds are already taking the lead part and the film has just begun. Can't wait to see the film, it seems very different and definitely Hitch....

 

The cameo is pretty neat, can't miss Hitch as he introduces his pair of pooches. It flows well with the couples theme. Id like to think they'd be chasing some serious birds as they are a working class breed. They were very popular and Hitch gifted actress Tallulah Bankhead a Sealyham upon wrapping Lifeboat, as a thanks for her dedication to the film which she finished during a bout of pneumonia. She named the dog Hitchcock. Many Hollywood stars had this breed of terrier. He was a dog lover, I didn't know.

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The film begins with juxtapositions long before the two leads juxtapose each other in a romantic comedy sense. We first see cars and people cooperating at a stoplight. There is a sense of order as the mass of people moves together at an assigned time and an assigned direction. Then as Miss Daniels looks up to the birds in the sky, amassing in a chaotic swarm. Even the soundtrack features the sounds of the birds mixed with the order inducing bells and horns of the crosswalk.

 

Part of the bird call soundtrack features a whistling sound, particularly just before a young boy whistles at Miss Daniels. This is the first hint of chaos among the people below, and it is contextualized within an attraction between male and female. Hitchcock walking out of the shop with his two terriers bridges these two themes of chaos v order and coupling. His two dogs (a couple) are on leashes, controlled and low to the ground.

 

The romantic comedy-esque banter between Miss Daniels and Mr. Brenner further links the balance of order and chaos with romantic attraction. In true screwball comedy style, their playful conversation has a double meaning. Mr. Brenner is in search of lovebirds, but not too "demonstrative." The birds in the shop must be kept in separate cages (ordered) to "protect the species."  And they talk of the moulting season as though it were mating season. The emerging theme is that romantic relationships can cause chaos. Mr. Brenner and Miss Daniels themselves are of different social "species," and Brenner's mother warns him of falling for her type. It's also not until their romance begins, as she steers the boat toward the dock where he awaits her in a flirtatious gaze, that nature (the birds) that the seagull scratches her forehead. Nature is devolving into chaos when the romantic relationship of the leads threatens their own social balance. When Miss Daniels is at Mr. Brenner's house for dinner, the finches swarm their living room, as they speak together alone at the birthday party, seagulls swarm the children, and so on.

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Good Evening...

1. We learn that both are playful. When Mitch asks Melanie for help, she acts like she works at the Pet Shop and its clear when he questions about the red birds that he know she has no clue what love birds are; yet she continues in the charade. Definitely, there seems to be budding chemistry between them which makes for a great romantic comedy....at least that's what Hitch would have us to believe this movie is. Or is it?????

2. When Melanie hears and sees the swarm of sea gulls hovering over the city, its startling and set a chilling bmood. Then once in the pet shop, the sound of many different birds is sweet and much softer (even though there were some rather boisterous birds) that along w/ the playful dialogue create a happy, more calmer, less threatening mood.

3. Hitch exits the pet shop w/ his two terriers as Melanie enters. As I read in the notes about "doubles", there are Two people looking in the window, Hitch & Melanie pass in shop doorway, Hitch walks his two dogs & there are two people walking behind Hitch. This ties into Mitch's request for two lovebirds.

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1) The scene provides a romantic comedy beginning, when we have the mistaken identity by Rod Taylor of Tipi Hedron as the storekeeper. She does not come across as a storekeeper, but a woman of means, but lacking any knowledge of her trade. Rod Taylor picks up on this immediately and begins his flirtation with the impostor.

 

2) The sound of the birds before we enter the store is a lot more obvious than we truly encounter in reality, but the movie is called the Birds and the sounds pick up on this as the major theme of the movie. As we move into the store, the sounds become calmer and more in keeping with a pet store with many birds. We feel calm and relaxed about the store with little foreshadowing in this particular scene except we know the movie is about birds.

 

3) The fact that Hitchcock has two dogs results in us thinking that pairing is going to occur. Is the woman about to pair with someone, or buy a pair, etc.

 

 

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I could not find the DD#19 thread (on Marnie opening scene) so I am adding my response here. 

 

Further Reflections:  After watching the clip, please go to Twitter (#Hitchcock50) or the TCM Message Board (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.  (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.to continue your reflections on this clip. Here are a few discussion starters (though feel free to come up with your own):

1.     Based on the opening sequence alone, what do you feel you already know about Marnie as a character? In what ways does Hitchcock visually reveal her character through her interaction with objects.

She is a criminal, a thief. She changes her identity then disposes it (e.g. dyed hair, complete change of wardrobe and accessories (the old wardrobe stored and literally “thrown away with the key.”) She has multiple Social Security cards.

2.     How does Hitchcock use Bernard Herrmann's score in this scene?

To me the score sounds like one from a romance or a romantic comedy – it is light with no undertones of anything sinister. The music juxtaposes with this woman who is a hard-core, very clever, criminal – but not a gangster or anyone violent.

3.     Did you see any variation in what Hitchcock is doing with his cameo in this film, and what do you think that variation means? It seems as if Hitchcock is in on the crime or knows what has happened and is watching out for Marnie – it feels as if he “has her six.” 

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  1. In what ways does this opening scene seem more appropriate to a romantic comedy than a “horror of the apocalypse” film? What do we learn about Melanie (Tippi Hedren) and Mitch (Rod Taylor) in this scene?   Both Melanie and Mitch had met prior to this meeting in the pet shop (before I go on - when Tippi walks thru the San Fransisco sign Hitch went from on location to set that was his transition.)  Anyways when Tippi walks up stairs and we here the birds they are low but when she walks onto the second floor all of the birds start to tweet louder.  Anyways Mitch knows who Melanie is and he is well tricking her (knowing she does NOT work in the pet store) he knows her but she does not know or remember him. 
  2. How does Hitchcock use sound design in this opening sequence? For example, how are the sounds of birds used to create a particular mood and atmosphere?  As I pointed out when Melanie is around all birds start to tweet louder and go crazy while she is around.  The main title sequence sets up a mood for the film. No film score in this film (and only) but the sounds of the birds are the music for the film.
  3. The opening scene contains a famous Hitchcock cameo. Describe the cameo and if you think it has any particular meaning in relation to this scene.  Hitch wanted to walk with his own Dog in this cameo out of a pet shop.

 

Fun side notes do you remember that 1994 (this was when I was 13 yrs old at the time) tv movie called Birds II Lands End, well that was filmed in my town. I became friends with the Art Director from that film. He took me around the sets, showed me around. Told me some stories. Gave me some sketches of sets, the script and a fake bird that I named Hitch.  He was also the assistant Art Director in Psycho II...   I also met the Director of the film who also Directed Halloween II and yes i was 13 yrs old at the time! 

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The way The Birds seem more appropriate to a romantic comedy than a “horror of the apocalypse” film is by the opening sequence starting off strange and comedic. Strange (the bird activity), but comedic by immediately throwing the Hitchcock cameo at you at the pet shop and then with Melanie fumbling the correct bird identifications for the new customer Mitch. She seems consumed with Mitch's good looks and is likely the reason for her mistakes if she knows anything about birds at all from this clip.

 

"There must be a storm at sea." is the general atmosphere in regards to the bird activity in the air outside and inside of the pet shop. A lot of activity displayed in the sound. Almost overwhelming. Overbearing the actors. Purposefully.

 

I think Hitchcock's cameo is him saying "I'm more of a dog person."

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1. In what ways does this opening scene seem more appropriate to a romantic comedy than a “horror of the apocalypse” film? What do we learn about Melanie (Tippi Hedren) and Mitch (Rod Taylor) in this scene?

 

Everything seems so normal in the opening scene, with the only sound being that of the birds and the city. I live 100 miles from the Atlantic, and we often have lots of seagulls around our grocery store and restaurant parking lots, so the large number of birds wasn’t unusual. No one in this clip seemed to take notice of them other than Melanie. She was told it was just a sign of a storm approaching – a storm indeed. The breezy opening, the boy whistling at Melanie, the daffy pet shop clerk (Ruth McDevitt, who always added a touch of humor to a film), and the encounter with Mitch all indicate that this could very well be a romantic comedy.

 

Melanie is a sophisticated, well dressed society type, who gladly falls into the role of the clerk as the ruggedly handsome Mitch approaches her as such. She responds to all his questions with an air of authority, without missing a beat. Mitch quickly sees through her, as he appears to be very intelligent, but is quite enjoying this charade. Sexual innuendo is seen in his concern about the behavior of the love birds in front of his young sister, for whom they are to be a birthday gift. The behavior of birds will become very important. Melanie rests her pencil against her chin as she sizes up this interesting customer, and their banter now becomes flirtatious as both play along.

 

2. How does Hitchcock use sound design in this opening sequence? For example, how re the sounds of birds used to create a particular mood and atmosphere?

 

The sounds of the city, though subdued, and the calls of the seagulls are a perfect soundtrack to this film. The title and the plot are enhanced by this symphony of the birds. In the opening scene, the birds’ cawing poses no threat to the people. They are mostly oblivious to this sound and go about their daily routine. In the pet shop, the main characters are in the bird department, and the songs of these creatures again serve as the soundtrack. They are very pleasant to listen to, and produce a positive and calming effect. We have no sense of fear or terror at their presence, for after all, they are in cages, something which Mitch finds cruel. Later in the film, he just might change his mind and find it might be kind to be cruel.

 

3. The opening scene contains a famous Hitchcock cameo. Describe the cameo and if you think it has any particular meaning in relation to this scene.

 

Hitchcock can appear as just an ordinary man no one would look at twice. He is so natural in his cameos. Here he emerges from the pet shop with his 2 dogs, with nary a bird in sight. He’s chosen his pets wisely. I love how one of his pups turns to look twice in the direction of the seagulls. Is he sensing something sinister as animals do in an approaching disaster?

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I think it relates to a romantic comedy the way Tippi Hendren is mistaken as a sales clerk. The flirtatious nature between her and Rod Taylor.

The opening scene the sound of the birds over power the other sounds of the street, setting up a scary atmosphere While the birds inside are chirping happily.

Hitchcock walking out  with 2 poodles could relate to the fact Rod Taylor wants to purchase a pair of love birds.

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I always enjoyed seeing Hitchcock cameos but never thought about how they related to the movie. I only saw them as just fun little windows bringing the movie into our world. You're walking down the street and then say look it's "Hitchcock". However bringing it up in this class makes me believe there might be something more.

 

In this case we hear bird sounds. As others have mentioned sometimes blocking out the sounds of the street and even overriding the dialogue. This along, with the title, of course give this foreshadowing that something is going to happen with the birds. But just in case there's any doubt you see Alfred Hitchcock leaving the pet shop quickly with his dogs as Tippi Hendren walks in. It has been my observation that dogs around a pet shop usually like to stop and sniff around. This time however the dogs are pulling at the leash as if to say "let's get out of here" and Hitchcock seems to agree with them. We all know he is the direct so is privy to information we don't have yet. So in retrospect perhaps we should have listened to him and his dogs. But instead we joined Tippi Hedren as she blissfully walks in the pet shop and the apocalyptic chaos begins. I think it's just a funny little joke that Hitchcock played on us. He told us all along there was danger but we didn't listen.

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1. This scene has the elements of a romantic comedy. First you have the 2 beautiful, likeable people. Then you have the meet cute. That is the cute little way they meet. Add in the light sparring or jousting banter. Ending with the seemingly argument and the parting of the ways. There you have the beginning of a romantic comedy.

 

2. The birds sounds seem to overwhelm all other sounds except for the conversation between the 2 principles. I find it odd that they are in a pet shop but you really don't hear any other animals.

 

3. Hitchcock and the two dogs, the 2 love birds and what about the 2 women caring for the same man. I also noticed a couple ???? of bird cages in the shop that had only 2 birds in them. Don't know if it means anything, just an observation.

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1)  The opening has a lighthearted feeling with Melanie and Mitch flirting about the birds.  Melanie is well dressed, well spoken and appears to have money.  We learn Mitch is intelligent and has some bird knowledge so he is wise to the fact that Melanie is actually not a store clerk but he has a sense of humor and plays along.  He is also well dressed, well spoken but he has a conservative manner about him.

 

2)  The background noise of the birds starts out as just that, background noise.  As Melanie nears the store, the noise steadily increases to the point is almost drowns out the street noise and is loud enough to get Melanie's attention.  It's a definite foreshadow of things to come.

 

3)  I would say that the cameo with the two dogs indicates there is a paring or double meaning in the film.

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If you are planning to watch The Birds tonight, and if you are an alum from Dr. Edwards's film noir class (or even if you are a film noir fan in general and don't plan to watch The Birds until later!), be sure to watch for Charles McGraw, film noir tough guy and detective, as a fisherman in the diner scene.

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1. The opening scene is lighthearted and has a really lovely atmosphere. Melanie and Mitch seems to be flirting with each other, as they searching for and talking about "love birds". Mitch also flirt and go along with Melanie, knowing that she's not the store clerk but still tried to talk and make funny conversations with her.

 

2. As Melanie walks across the street, the voice of birds is hear in the background. As she walks across the street, the voice of the birds is getting louder and it captivates her attention, predicting what might happen in the future when chaos gets to your head. In the store, the sound of the bird is use to create a bright, joyful, and romantic atmosphere.

 

3. I think that Hitchcock's cameo shows his power as a director and how he will control us and the film as well as manipulating the audiences. In the scene, Hitchcock is guiding 2 dogs. The audience is one of the dog. The other dog is the character of Melanie.

 

 

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