Dr. Rich Edwards

Daily Dose #19: Real Identities (Opening Scene of Marnie)

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The opening scene shows the character has multiple identities and is a thief from the amount of cash that's emptied from her purse. She neatly packs her new life while tossing away her old life.

The music seems serious and reflective as she is packing but becomes livelier and radiant when  she rinses her dark hair and becomes a blond.

Yes, he comes out of the hotel room looks at the audience as if the scene is some kind of joke. Could it be while the character is changing ids the name of one is Marion as in Psycho.

He seems to want to follow the girl and peek into her room.

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Some very astute observations and I have nothing to add to what's already been said here. I've seen Marnie before but I'm looking forward to seeing it again in light of what I've learned from this course. Hitchcock was a complex artist but at his core there was a simplicity that shows through. I definitely appreciate him in a way I never did before taking this course.

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1.    Based on the opening sequence alone, what do you feel you already know about Marnie as a character? In what ways does Hitchcock visually reveal her character through her interaction with objects.

 

I sense that Marnie is a woman with good taste in fashion and that she has money to purchase all the items she’s packing and from the box belonging to Albert’s which s a very high end store.  I see suspicious behavior with all the money and hidden I.D.’s and changed hair color. Definitely a woman on the run from something.

 

2.    How does Hitchcock use Bernard Herrmann's score in this scene?

 

Mr. Herrmann’s score is mysterious as it pulsates through the hall scene and builds up into the packing scene which speeds up with the violins smoothing out the scene as Marnie begins to finalize her packing and as she washes the dye out of her hair when the music swells as the camera builds us up to view and discover a blonde Marnie.

 

3.    Did you see any variation in what Hitchcock is doing with his cameo in this film, and what do you think that variation means?

 

The one variation I noticed over the film years, is that Hitchcock is starting to show his full face as opposed to a profile view more often in his cameos.  He seemed to have started his cameos showing the back of his head,then his profile, and slowly into a full face view like that in Rear Window and now in Marnie, where he looks directly into the camera and without any props.  Most of Hitchcock’s appearances seem to have a prop; the headset in The Lodger, the dogs in The Birds, the clock in Rear Window, the newspaper in Lifeboat, etc.  This appearance had no props.

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July 26, 2017 – Hitchcock lecture Part 19

 

1. Marnie is deceptive, she is either hiding from something or someone, or is deliberately disguising herself for a purpose. We don’t know if her intentions are good, innocent, or evil. We also know that she is beautiful.

 

2 . The opening music builds tension, and blossoms at the first sight of Marnie’s face. It increases the audience’s sense of wonder and awe, while giving us a hint as to what the genre of the film is.

 

3. Hitchcock first looks at the back of Marnie, highlighting what the audience is wondering--"who is this lady?" Then Hitchcock blatantly looks at the camera in this one. He doesn’t even blend in the background—it’s almost a shot just for him. This could imply his rising ego, or desire to make himself known as his career slows down. 

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I am frankly a little disappointed that both of the lectures on Hitchcock's films with Tippi Hedren completely avoided any mention of the horrible "relationship," to put it gently, between the director and the star, particularly since other lectures didn't shy away from mentioning gossip or things that happened behind the scenes. Perhaps it was because the theme of stars happened last week, or because it would've required the lectures to say anything negative about Hitchcock. But I find it a travesty that we could even try to discuss The Birds and Marnie in the context of Hitchcock and his relationships with his collaborators (of which Hedren would have been one!) without even alluding to the very famous and absolutely toxic collaboration that occurred on these two films.

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Posted (edited)

 

  1. Based on the opening sequence alone, what do you feel you already know about Marnie as a character? In what ways does Hitchcock visually reveal her character through her interaction with objects. I feel that Marnie is a woman who struggles with her identity, but that she is also a criminal from her deceptive and hidden charm that one fails to even notice when they read her facial and body expressions.

     

  2. How does Hitchcock use Bernard Herrmann's score in this scene? To give us a sense of mystery and suspense, as well as a revelation as to who this person is since she is a criminal who has washed away the evidence that nobody will know who she really is.

 

Did you see any variation in what Hitchcock is doing with his cameo in this film, and what do you think that variation means? No, I did not see any variation of Hitchcock's cameo in this film. I do not believe that it means anything, except that he came out of his room.

 

Edited by BLACHEFAN
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  1. Based on the opening sequence alone, what do you feel you already know about Marnie as a character? In what ways does Hitchcock visually reveal her character through her interaction with objects. It appears that Marnie is dishonest or hiding....taking on the persona of different people....as shown in picking different Social Security cards and changing her hair color...as well as her clothing.  Why is she changing her identity?? Who or why is she hiding her identity from...Is she wanted or escaping some form of cruelty...Is she guilty or innocent?? Throwing the key down the grate she is throwing away the old life.....Even the packing of the suitcases the old items are just tossed in the suitcase ...where the new luggage is neatly packed

 

How does Hitchcock use Bernard Herrmann's score in this scene?...Haunting repetitive music as she is casting off her old image....but the music builds when she is washing her hair of the old dark dye....It is almost Euphoric as her face is finally shown with her beautiful blond new image setting off on her new identity...very moving

 

Did you see any variation in what Hitchcock is doing with his cameo in this film, and what do you think that variation means? What strikes me is how Hitchcock...looks right into the camera very different from his other films...where there is traditionally no direct glance at the audience....there is no missing him in this film...and it is right in the beginning...as if he is saying look no further....here I am ...but what about the woman ...Who is she?

 

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I will admit that I have not seen Marnie yet, so my responses will probably be more brief today, perhaps much to the delight of the other members of this course who have been gracious enough to read and reply to my posts.  Thank you, by the way.

 

 

Based on the opening sequence alone, what do you feel you already know about Marnie as a character? In what ways does Hitchcock visually reveal her character through her interaction with objects.

 

 

From the opening sequence, we learn that Marnie is a thief who has needed to change her appearance and identity several times, as indicated by the black hair dye and the five or six Social Security cards.  I find it interesting that the name on the first one is Marion, just like Marion Crane in Psycho, who also uses an alias when checking into the Bates Motel.  She has stolen quite a bit of money already, as indicated by all of the packages with nice clothing and the money that she still has with her.  We sense that she has done this several times in the past because she seems to have a routine and there is noting frantic about her actions, nothing to draw attention to her.  In fact she seems confident, almost smug, especially when walking down the hall and through the station and then when placing the suitcase in the locker and dropping the key in the grate.  She does it very casually by dropping the key on the ground and then guiding it in with her shoe.  I am reminded of the cigarette lighter scene in Strangers on a Train here.  And of course a key played a prominent role in Dial "M" for Murder, just as a necklace was crucial in Vertigo and a missing necktie was vital to the plot of Frenzy.  Hedren also displays this smug confidence after washing the dye out of her hair.  What a beautiful shot of Tippi Hedren when she stands up from the sink, throws her hair back, and hits us with that mysterious and confident smile.    

 

How does Hitchcock use Bernard Herrmann's score in this scene?

 

 

Even though there is additional orchestration here, more than just strings, I was reminded of the scene in Psycho when Janet Leigh is writing out numbers on the paper she finally tries to flush away later. (Once she has decided to return to Arizona) I replayed that portion of Psycho just now and Herrmann's strings sound very similar in both films.  So there are two recurring images/sounds or motifs here:  Marnie has an SS# with the name "Marion" on it; she has a large amount of cash; and the music is very similar in both scenes.  Furthermore, Herrmann's score does a nice job of complementing the images on the screen, adding to what is going on here.  This is not light-hearted scoring that you would hear in The Trouble With Harry (although that is a dark comedy).  This music helps to establish what type of person Marnie might be and it suggests any suspense that may arise later in the film.  For me the score helps to draw parallels between Psycho and Marnie, the film and the character.  In both we see a woman who has absconded with a large amount of money; we see the name Marion in both; and as Dr. Edwards pointed out in today's discussion, we see black hair dye spiraling down a drain, reminiscent of the blood in the shower scene in Psycho.  Many people who watched Marnie possibly also saw Psycho.  They knew how things ended for Marion.  Will they end the same way for Marnie?  Will she have a change of heart?  If so, will it be too late?  Again, this is speculation, questions that many of you probably already know the answers to.

 

Did you see any variation in what Hitchcock is doing with his cameo in this film, and what do you think that variation means? 

 

 

With this cameo, Hitchcock defies the fourth, "invisible" wall between the audience and the film itself.  I realize this is a practice dating back hundreds of years, and it is often used so often today that it almost becomes a bad cliche.  Again, I can merely speculate on why Hitchcock did his cameo this way in this film, and I am looking forward to seeing what other people have to say as well.  For me, the look he gives us is saying he knows we are watching.  He has always known that we have been watching.  Much has already been said about movie goers as voyeurs.  Hitchcock calls Jeffries a peeping tom in Rear Window, and Truffaut spoke with Hitchcock about this in his interview.  We have been spying as viewers and spying along with characters in his films ever since The Pleasure Garden.  Sitting in a theater with other movie goers just seems to make it easier for us to justify and permit our voyeuristic tendencies.  As a film maker, Hitchcock wanted us to watch his films.  He needed for us to watch his films since they were his livelihood.  However, it seems to me that his look says, "Join me yet again on another journey.  Join me as we watch these events unfold together."  We are complicit in this undertaking, all witnesses to what is about to transpire.  That is make take, anyway, which is either very insightful or way off target.  Please, let me know, but be kind.  :D

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  1. Based on the opening sequence alone, what do you feel you already know about Marnie as a character? In what ways does Hitchcock visually reveal her character through her interaction with objects.                                              Marnie is hiding something big.  If I had not seen the movie I would still assume the clothes and money were stolen.   She is obviously experienced changing her identity physically and with the variety of social security cards.  She is really good by hiding the cards in the back of the gold case.  She seems to easily go from one identity to another and probably this is not the first time.  I love how she puts the old clothes and items into a suitcase and leaves it in the locker and "loses" the key!   Marnie does not seem to enjoy the items.  If I had an all new wardrobe I would lovingly look at the items.  Marnie just robotically takes them out of the box and puts them in the suitcase while throwing the boxes around.  She seems almost in a trance with all of her movements.  Marnie seems to have no problem functioning in her world.  
  2. How does Hitchcock use Bernard Herrmann's score in this scene?  This music is sad but with a little edge.  Poor Marnie look at how she gets through life in a sort of trancelike way.......and then the music seems to hit a point and become more dramatic and less sad.  The music also gets louder as she washes out the black dye in her hair.  
  3. Did you see any variation in what Hitchcock is doing with his cameo in this film, and what do you think that variation means? Hitchcock seemed to look at the camera (us) and say - wow!  Maybe what is going on with that!  I don't recall that he ever looked at or towards the camera.  

This movie made me think of Vertigo.  I have only seen Marnie once because it makes me really uncomfortable.  I had forgotten about the rape scene.  Like Jimmy Stewart in The Wrong Man - I felt both movies had great acting and everything else but I did not want to be that uncomfortable.  Vertigo has really grown on me and I own it now.  

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In this opening scene we see The back of a dark-haired presumably beautiful woman. Her interactions with her luggage and wardrobe shows us that she is up to something . She disposes of broccoli old bras panties suits and carefully takes out her new wardrobe and gingerly puts it in the new luggage piece. And then the washing of the hair. You see the dye going down the drain in the sink ( very psycho ) and then out emerges a beautiful blonde Marnie. We of course clearly see through her actions that she seems a bit devious and secretive. I love the added scene with the key down there great. Alfred Hitchcock was brilliant at bringing back his touches from other great movies. Including of course the social Security card with Marion's name. Dear sweet ouch bye-bye Marion.

Herrmann's score was as always brilliant. Slowly building to the crescendo as our brunette cocoon turned into a stunningly Beautiful blonde butterfly. I agree with Hitchcock when he says his movies would be nothing without the music scores. Of course especially psycho.

Hitchcock's cameo was very interesting. Like nothing before. It was blatant and there he was interfering in our scene and even looking at the camera for a second. It was very funny. But definitely a little jarring and unusual for his cameo.

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​1. We know from this scene that Marnie is a thief, and she uses several different identities to presumably steal from many different places as different people. She has many different social security cards/numbers and we can tell that she does this a lot because of how confident she is. She walks to her room confidently, and goes through the routine of washing out her hair, changing clothes and suitcases, and getting a new identity, calmly. She is even smiling and smug when she washes her hair out, and seems in no way stressed about being caught, even when 'losing' the key in front of everyone.

 

​2. The score is very reminiscent of Vertigo to me, like the love scenes between Scottie and Madeline, which seems very fitting because just like Judy's character in Vertigo, Marnie is also in disguise, using a false identity, not who she appears to be. It is also similar to Psycho, especially when paired with all the visual hints like the money, the name Marion, and the hair dye.

 

​3. Hitchcock breaks the fourth wall in this cameo, something pretty rare for the time, and I think that could signify that he is welcoming us to spy on Marnie's story, aware that we know it is a film even if Marnie does not. This could also be another voyeurism theme? because we are seeing crime like in Rear Window

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1.  We see that she is changing her complete personality; her hair, her clothes and her identity.  The different social security numbers could be someone on the run from something like a violent ex-husband, but the wad of money makes it seem more nefarious.  She's more likely on the run from the law.

 

2.  The music seems repetitious.  Repeating the same strains over and over until the crescendo when she is revealed to be a blonde. It could indicate that this is something she has done over and over, repeating a pattern of changing her identity.

 

3.  This time Hitch looks at the camera.  Everyone is watching for him, by this point in his career.  He's letting you see him, so we can get on with the story.

 

 

 

I've seen this movie before and I admit I've never noticed the echoes of previous films.  The key from Notorious or the grate from Strangers on a Train.  Thanks to Rich for pointing it out. It adds to my enjoyment of the film.

 

One thing I've always remembered from this film is the pronunciation of "insurance".  Whenever my sister pronounces it differently from me, I think of Marnie.

 

In my travels, I have noticed that people who live in the deep South tend to emphasize the first syllable in all polysyllabic words.

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We know Marnie is very experienced in a life of crime based on her multiple Social Security cards and dyeing her hair to change her appearance. She also appears to have expensive tastes based on the clothing and lingerie she tosses into her luggage along with the large sums of money.

 

The score is repetitive, probably referring to her repeated crimes committed then gets dramatic as we see Marnie rise up from the sink like a siren out of the ocean.

 

Hitch breaks the fourth wall for his cameo and seems to ogle Marnie as she is quite attractive. He seems to know something is up with her and invites us to watch. It could also refer to his relationship with Hedren; she said of Hitch "He was too possessive and too demanding. I cannot be possessed by anyone. But, then, that's my own hangup".

 

Hedren also said of Hitch: "Everyone–I mean everyone–knew he was obsessed with me. He always wanted a glass of wine or champagne, with me alone, at the end of the day. He was really isolating me from everyone".[

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Daily Dose #19 "Marnie" 1964

 

It's been years since I watched this movie & the reason is... I did not like it that a man blackmailed a woman into marrying him.

 

However, staying with the opening scene:

 

Q1:  What we know about Marnie...looks like dual personalities one dark & one light...the first we see is a dark haired woman walking away from the camera...this may not even be Tippi Hedren (Margaret "Marnie" Edgar...I don't know ...may be a stand in. Assuming it is she, who suddenly becomes  a blond & a different person all to the score of Bernard Herrmann. 

 

Q2: I like this music it is not over done...I do not know much about what instruments were used but it does fit the camera footage perfectly & the part where it changes as she changes her hair color is perfect timing.

 

Q3: Hitchcock's cameo...he looks directly at the camera & appears to be following Marnie.

 

In Marnie's room (we do not know her name at this point) she has two suitcases in different styles...more of the famous Hitchcockian 'doubles' that appear in many of his movies. The dark hair is washed out & she is now a blond. This was probably also a stand in actress or ' double' ...I'm not sure there was a reason for Tippi to do that  to her natural hair. Just saying what I think about film & how these things work. Maybe TIppi wanted to do this to her hair to 'feel' the part better ...I don't know. She has become a different woman with different hair. 

 

One suitcase  (rose or peach colored) is orderly... the other (gray) one in disarray. Marnie's style is also a 'double' the dark haired woman is more in disarray ...the blond more severe looking. One suitcase all the clothes are folder & in perfect order...the one she later discards is a jumble.

 

Here through close up camera footage we see at least four different social security ID cards; all similar but still with different female names. Marnie selects one. Albert's?  She has been somewhere named Albert's. This folder has a lavender cover. After re-watching the video I just realized she chose her ID before washing her hair & I thought it was the other way around.

 

NOTE:  The music changes as Marnie changes her hair color.

 

She leaves her room, locks her suitcase away & discards the key down a drain..she won't be using that persona again. It has been thrown away. She has the money ...a lot of money...in the rose colored suitcase with her ...she intends to use it ...possibly to live on it. Looks like the scene from "Psycho" as Marion Crane (Janet Leigh) leaves with $40,000.00 in her suitcase. She intends to start a new life somewhere with her stolen money too.

 

She had the money in a yellow purse & dumped it into the more ordered suitcase. This is like all the money in "Shadow of a Doubt"..thrown on the floor & on the bedside table by Uncle Charlie (Joseph Cotton). Also, the grate is like the grate in "Strangers on a Train"...however, Marnie does not want the object back...the key...it is tossed away to never be found or used again.

 

Marnie is moving through the station & the ticket announcer is calling out all the place available.

 

Where will Marnie go?  What is she hiding from if anything? Money & different ids can mean many things. we are lured in to see what happens with this interesting Hitchcock character...Marnie.

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I imagine everyone knows, but for some who my be like me, and learn about stuff when it’s too late... at 7 pm tonight the entire Kim Novak interview with our dear Robert, is airing right before Vertigo. sigh missing him.

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Good Afternoon....

1. Marnie's introduction: two suitcases, one clothes neatly packed, straight from the box; the other tossed into the case no order; the pocket book is changed out, as is the Social Security card (choice of 3); the removing of the dark dye from her hair; putting of the suitcase i to a locker and tossing key down drain--all point to Marine as a thief covering her tracks.

2. Herrmann score creates a mood of anticipation rising and comes to a crescendo when Marnie rises from the sink, smiling and now a blond! The whole mood changes once this occurs and she gets rid of the old suitcase and is dressed to the nines and ready to go on the next heist; I mean adventure.

3. In most of Hitch's other cameos, he just walks across the screen or is sitting down or in a crowd, seldom looking at , in or back at the camera. Perhaps Hitch is no longer wanting to be incognito in him films; no more "where's Waldo?" No more Hide and seek so to speak. Not really sure.

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Marnie's character unfolds in the opening sequence to a lady leaving clutching a Lemon leather purse like a doll under a child's arm.

 

The bellhop carries her burdens, brand newly purchased boxes. She packs the new items -- transfers the contents of the old purse to the new and places an ID chosen from a stack, then locks the old clothes and throws away the key. Symbolic we sense that Marnie's character is more an likely split, as she sheds he hair color for a new golden shade, from a bleak black tone.

 

I gather a street wise girl on the run, but also that she is to be followed, as we generally see her from a back angle, never seeing her face under she whips her new locks back.

 

We wonder why she held the lemon purse so oddly, perhaps a throw back to a childhood issue?

 

Herrmann's score resonates Marnie's new identity and cymbals clash as her face is finally revealed.

 

Hollywood Hitch comes out of one of the rooms of the hotel and practically winks into the camera. He is now not part of the action as in previous cameos, he is an extension of the camera and therefore us as the audience.

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Less than three minutes and so much is going on! First Hitchcock does his cameo straight away and he breaks the fourth wall by looking right at the audience. This is our first signal that this is not going to be a realistic film where we think we are looking at filmed reality rather than an artistic artifact.

 

In these early scenes we follow a dark-haired woman with tasteful clothes (including a scene-stealing yellow handbag) and a graceful walk. But we do not see her face. Maybe she's Marnie and maybe she's not. In the hotel room, the camera closes in on two suitcases--doubling alert!! We see the woman's arms and hands, but not her face. But her hands and possessions tell a lot. She is packing a suitcase with the new items that the bellboy carried down the hall. The new suitcase contains tasteful and expensive looking items. The other suitcase is full of discards, carelessly piled up. We know that she is undressing because we see the clothes that she wore when she entered the room. However, unlike Psycho, the camera does not show us her body. The emphasis is on her action which, like Psycho, includes a handbag and a pile of cash. Is she a robber? A woman on the run? A well-funded spy. We see that she switches social security cards, and again it seems possible that she is a criminal or engaged in espionage. What is certain is that she has far more than a dual identity.

 

The hair-washing scene is very Psycho-esque in the way the dye swirls down the drain. But it is only dye and not blood. This woman is in control. The camera pans up from the sink to blonde hair that flips back and reveals the beautiful face of Tippi Hendren with an enigmatic half-smile. Who is this woman? All we can say for sure is that she is efficient, in transit, well-funded, and methodical. She doesn't seem to be doing this routine for the first time.( A very similar shot of shampooed hair and then a lovely face appears in the opening of Funny Face.)

 

Then we see her leave the discarded suitcase in a station locker and the camera focuses on the key in her hand--a bow to Notorious. I also think this scene looks ahead to the station locker scene in Susan Seidelman's Desperately Seeking Susan which also explores identity shifting and doubling. ( Madonna and Hitchcock--what an idea!) She efficiently discards the key in the grate and keeps moving. She shows very little emotion or expression--it is almost like she is under a spell or moved by remote control. The isolated body parts and the focus on her walk made me think of the opening of Strangers on a Train, dualistic and set in another train station.

 

The musical score has a fascinating passage where the same passage is played and then repeated, almost like call and response in a dance number. The sense of variations on a theme and doubling is inescapable. It sets a mood that suggests deep and suppressed feeling that we could never get from the action alone.

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Marnie is an escape artist, a chameleon. She seems very adept at getting out of jams and slipping into a new life pretty easily. She likes nice things, luxury clothing and accessories. The identity cards enable her to switch personas easily enough. Hair dye comes in handy. Bus station lockers are convenient when you can so easily get rid of unwanted stuff. 

 

The Hermann score is so dramatic and passionate. To me it hints at Marnie's mysterious personality, waiting to be revealed and loved. 

 

We don't have to look so hard for Hitchcock's cameos in these later films.  There he is, his lovable, impish self, enjoying every second.

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Daily Dose #19

Daily Dose #19: Real Identities
Opening Scene from Marnie (1964)

1.Based on the opening sequence alone, what do you feel you already know about Marnie as a character? In what ways does Hitchcock visually reveal her character through her interaction with objects.

 

Based on this scene, Marnie seems a methodic woman, she seems to knows exactly what she is doing all the time, as it was something common to her (since the packing to the change of ID and hair color). I like very much how it is possible to set a contrast between the way she puts the clothes in one baggage and the other one (the old clothes are almost thrown in a messy way while the new ones are carefully accomodated inside) and how that conveys a certain sense that she is not longer interested in what it feels like her past (or maybe she wants to forget it) and she is more eager to give a different impression regarding her future appearance. Considered how she walks she looks determined. Also, due to the presence of cash money, ir is quite concebible that she is involved probably in a robbery (which is supported by her changing of identities). Personally, I found very shocking the way how her face is revealed, because after all the other references through the objects and her interaction with them, she doesn't seem that innocent how she looks. 

 

2. How does Hitchcock use Bernard Herrmann's score in this scene?

 

In my opinion, at the begining the score infuses some mistery regarding Marnie and increases the suspicion that it is something wrong with this woman who seem hiding something which is revealed by what she does. I particularly like (as I expressed in my previous response) how the score accompanies the revealing of Marnie's face. It makes bigger the impact of finding out the identity of someone that apparently has done something illegal with a that rational method. Moreover, it sets a link with the abbility of Marnie to get jobs based on the innocence she projects, but now it looks deceiving.  

 

3. Did you see any variation in what Hitchcock is doing with his cameo in this film, and what do you think that variation means? 

 

I believe that unlike other cameos, this is shorter and he looks straight to the camera for an instante after which he turns around. I would say that it feels as if Hitch is kind of surprised to be seen and he wants to remain unnoticed. It is like he is making sure that nobody is looking at him and that is why he is looking both sides. Possibly that is kind of a reference to the hidden nature of Marnie activities as a thief.

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  1. Based on the opening sequence alone, what do you feel you already know about Marnie as a character? In what ways does Hitchcock visually reveal her character through her interaction with objects.
  • Marnie doesn't have an identity that is her own. She has a very proud look on her face. She is very precise and this is something she has been doing for a long time. 
  • Her movements seem very ridged and put together. 
  1. How does Hitchcock use Bernard Herrmann's score in this scene?
  • Romance and Mystery are the key words that pop into my head when I hear this score. It has a much lighter sound than many of his previous films. It plays into the camera work and adds to the fact that we barely see Marnie.
  1. Did you see any variation in what Hitchcock is doing with his cameo in this film, and what do you think that variation means? 
  • We see Hitchcock a lot quicker than we usually do. He also looks straight at the camera and the cut from him is super quick.  This is telling us that this film isn't what it appears to be. 
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Based on the opening sequence alone, what do you feel you already know about Marnie as a character? In what ways does Hitchcock visually reveal her character through her interaction with objects.

 

Marnie is a chameleon and we meet her as she's changing her colors blithely throwing away the old and carefully packing up the new.

 

How does Hitchcock use Bernard Herrmann's score in this scene?

 

At first the music is used to pass the time as it builds towards a crescendo of sound and rising pitch as Marnie raises her head from the sink becoming her new character.

 

Did you see any variation in what Hitchcock is doing with his cameo in this film, and what do you think that variation means?

 

We see Mr. Hitchcock exiting a hotel room, looking both ways, observing the passing lady as if to make sure no one has seen him. This is almost a microcosm of Marnie as she is hiding from what's behind her as much as he is trying to escape from what's behind him.

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Based on the opening sequence alone, what do you feel you already know about Marnie as a character? In what ways does Hitchcock visually reveal her character through her interaction with objects.

Hitch wants us to know that the purse is something important. He keeps it in the center of the screen as Marnie walks away from the camera. It colored canary yellow and is the only biright color on the screen, We know that she has at least a double life. She has fake SS numbers in a secret compartment. She has a stash of cash that she treats casually.

She packs a second suitcase then locks it in a box at the station, then throws away the key. This is not what one would expect and she wants to make sure there is no link between her and that suitcase. Almost certainly it contains all the pieces of the identity she is throwing away.

How does Hitchcock use Bernard Herrmann's score in this scene?

Hermann's score does something neat in the beginning of the scene, which is to say it does nothing. This is filler music that says 'everything si fine, the situation is normal'. What is neat is that it plays while Marnie is engaged in activities that may be normal to her, but are anything but normal to the audience.

The music then swells majestically as we see the real Tipi Hedron face emerge in slow motion. This is saying: the most important part of the scene is how pretty Tipi Hedron is...

Did you see any variation in what Hitchcock is doing with his cameo in this film, and what do you think that variation means?

Yes! Hitchcock waits for Marnie to pass then comes out of a side door, pauses, then turns and looks at the audience as if to say: 'See? Here I am! You can stop looking for my cameo and just watch the movie.'

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Much is revealed as to Marnie's character in the opening scenes. The vastly different suitcases one very neat and orderly and the other completely chaotic show two different lifestyles entirely. Several different SS cards show that she must live a double life of some kind perhaps more with all the different aliases she appears to have. Also, at the end she disposes of the key to the suitcase obviously not wanting it to be found. At one point Marnie even looks to be changing her hair color from brown to blonde (at least it appeared that way to me). 

 

Herrmann's score starts off rather light lulling you into a false sense of security as normal things play out across the screen. Then the music begins to swell as Marnie washes her hair in the sink leading us into our first look at Marnie. 

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Based on the opening sequence alone, what do you feel you already know about Marnie as a character? In what ways does Hitchcock visually reveal her character through her interaction with objects.

 

Marnie is meticulous. She assembles a fresh identity, each carefully purchased bit of it, into a brightly lined suitcase as she simultaneously discards her previous incarnation piece by piece into a drab brown suitcase. I'm then given that a dark past is spiraling down the drain with her hair dye. She emerges shiny and cleansed. The clues to her former identity are stuck away in a locker, the key to it kicked into a storm sewer.

 

How does Hitchcock use Bernard Herrmann's score in this scene?

 

Herrmann's undulating figure rises and falls, echoing itself in meter but not in melody. Once played, it sounds hopeful, then again, changed, it's not.

 

Did you see any variation in what Hitchcock is doing with his cameo in this film, and what do you think that variation means? 

 

Hitch enters and, for a moment, watches Marnie pass down the hall with all her new paraphernalia. Then he turns and gives us a look, doesn't he? To me he's saying there's more to this than meets the eye.

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