Dr. Rich Edwards

Daily Dose #20: Look! (Opening Scene of Frenzy)

168 posts in this topic

1. How does the opening of Frenzy differ from the opening of The Lodger? Feel free to rewatch the clip from The Lodger (Daily Dose #2) for comparison. Aside from finding a body, I don't see how anything about these two are similar. The Lodger is more frightening and scary. Frenzy treats death rather calmly.

 

2. What are some of the common Hitchcock touches that you see in this opening scene? Be specific. The long shot from the helicopter. A dolly shot on a major scale but still the same motion. Then we continue the shot on the politician.

 

3. Using Frenzy as an example, what thoughts do you have about the various purposes Hitchcock had in mind when he created his opening scenes? In the Daily Doses, we have focused on opening scenes, so there should be patterns or strategies you have noticed over the course of opening scenes spanning Hitchcock's 50 year career. Approaching from a great distance seem to be an opening scene standard. Rebecca and Psycho come to mind. Further into the opening, a major disaster occurs. Hitchcock makes the opening more important than most because it get you hooked into the movie.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The opening scene of The Lodger has a frantic, terror-filled vibe, with the first visual of the woman screaming into the camera setting the tone.  The crowds seen in The Lodger are clearly lower-class by their attire, while the crowd in Frenzy appears well-dressed and affluent.  We see police rushing into action in The Lodger, yet Frenzy has an almost casual feel to the discovery of the body...."Hey, look!"  

 

The rolling view over the river into the heart of London is in true Hitchcock POV fashion.  We are treated to a fantastic birds-eye view, as we sweep along the river.  The regal/royal music is perfectly matched with the setting, and viewers are immediately put in a famous and familiar location.  

 

Hitchcock sets a unique tone with his opening scenes, always making the viewer eager to know what has  happened and what will happen next.  He's able to draw us into each story line with a mix of graphics, set design and music.  Once we see a few minutes of the opening scene, we always want more!

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How does the opening of Frenzy differ from the opening of The Lodger?

 

"Frenzy" starts with a peaceful and scenic overview of the River Thames. It almost feels like watching a travelogue. Then the camera comes in on a man giving a speech and then we see a body floating in the river. "The Lodger" starts with the murder right away and we see the crowds' reaction to the murder. It's not peaceful at all, it's chaotic right from the start with a screaming woman.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

​The opening scene of Frenzy ​starts out calmly, nothing much happening until we see a naked woman in the water. In The Lodger​, it starts out a woman screaming and is never calmly. One of Hitchcock's touch is the scenic scene of London. Another scene is where we see a crowd of people, like in some of his films. The opening scene shows a distant view of the crowd. The other films that comes to my mind are ​Psycho and ​Rebecca ​that are very distant scenes. the opening scenes of his movies are eager and suspenseful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does the opening of Frenzy differ from the opening of The Lodger? Feel free to rewatch the clip from The Lodger (Daily Dose #2) for comparison. The long pan shot that opens Frenzy is almost like the intro of a travelogue, with bright, majestic music that would signify a completely different kind of movie. In The Lodger, we get a pan shot of the sign outisde a seedy music hall and an accompanying musical score that doesn’t leave us as shocked when we see a girl actually being murdered.

 

2. What are some of the common Hitchcock touches that you see in this opening scene? Be specific. Cinematically, we have the long pan that slowly moves from a birds-eye view of London, down the Thames River and through London Bridge, then in to the crowd covering the announcement that this part of the Thames will be going through a clean-up project that will rid the river of waste and pollution. Hitchcock’s brand of humor then produces a woman’s nude corpse floating into view. (I love that Hitch’s cameo has him, Derby and all, as a member of the crowd.)

 

3. Using Frenzy as an example, what thoughts do you have about the various purposes Hitchcock had in mind when he created his opening scenes? In the Daily Doses, we have focused on opening scenes, so there should be patterns or strategies you have noticed over the course of opening scenes spanning Hitchcock's 50 year career. Hitchcock puts more information in his opening scenes than pages of dialogue could convey. He uses images, light and shadow, a moving camera, and background music to give us setting and, usually, an introduction to important characters. In Frenzy, he turns the image of a picturesque London on its ear by capping off the political announcement about the river clean-up with the discovery of a woman’s murdered body floating up to the embankment where the announcement is being made.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does the opening of Frenzy differ from the opening of The Lodger? Feel free to rewatch the clip from The Lodger (Daily Dose #2) for comparison.

 

There are many people which is same but in this clip people are focused away from the body of the girl. They are not just milling about on the street as in the Lodger but are attending a speech about cleaning up the river. We also get a better view of the setting. The Lodger was dark where Frenzy is in the middle of the day.

 

2. What are some of the common Hitchcock touches that you see in this opening scene? Be specific.

 

On thing I noticed was the large crowd in modern day London. Our focus is on the speaker but he is not in our eye line but slightly above us as if we are the crowd. He puts us right into the action.

 

3. Using Frenzy as an example, what thoughts do you have about the various purposes Hitchcock had in mind when he created his opening scenes? In the Daily Doses, we have focused on opening scenes, so there should be patterns or strategies you have noticed over the course of opening scenes spanning Hitchcock's 50 year career.

 

In all his movies, we are almost immediately tossed into the action of the story. Different camera angles give us different point of view. Most of the action starts in a public place with a large group of people except for a few.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does the opening of Frenzy differ from the opening of The Lodger? Feel free to rewatch the clip from The Lodger (Daily Dose #2) for comparison.

 

Frenzy opens with a bird’s eye view of the Thames and London as we approach the London Bridge. The Lodger opens with the murderer and the victim screaming for her life. Though we won’t see that occur until later in Frenzy, we do see the first victim at the end of this daily dose clip. This victim is nude and face down in the river, while The Lodger victim is face up on the floor, fully dressed, appearing as a pile of clothing. The title of Frenzy stands out as quite odd in the film’s opening, disturbing the aerial view of the city with its red and white striped large letters, somewhat reminiscent of the ‘Murder’ sign flashing in The Lodger. The music in Frenzy is grand and regal, and seems a fitting tribute to the city Hitchcock once called home. However, as the shot reaches the bridge, the black smoke from the crossing ship casts a pall over the scene. London might be beautiful from above, but as we get closer to the ground, something’s not quite right. This is echoed by the speaker telling the crowd that new policies will clean up the pollution and render the water cleaner. In The Lodger, we are treated to human pollution by the murder victim’s body dead on the floor. Both films depict crowds gathered in the city, one for ostensibly an annoucement of better days to come, and the other gathered to see the underbelly of the town laid before them. Their only hope is that the police can identify and find the perpetrator. In Frenzy, the industrial pollution is the main topic until the nude dead woman floats into view, confirming that the river is indeed less than clean.

 

2. What are some of the common Hitchcock touches that you see in this opening scene? Be specific.

 

Common touches are the musical scores lending the proper mood for the film, either grand, calming, anxious, or forboding. Frenzy has a flock of birds fly by, unnoticed by the crowd as in The Birds. The main theme or character is introduced up front by the murder in The Lodger; the dead body in Frenzy; Marion Crane in Psycho; Marnie in Marnie; the family and perpetrators in The Man Who Knew Too Much; and Miss Froy and Iris Henderson in The Lady Vanishes. Groups of people are common in Frenzy, The Lodger, the boxing match and party in The Ring; and the dancing girls and audience in The Pleasure Garden.

 

3. Using Frenzy as an example, what thoughts do you have about the various purposes Hitchcock had in mind when he created his opening scenes? In the Daily Doses, we have focused on opening scenes, so there should be patterns or strategies you have noticed over the course of opening scenes spanning Hitchcock's 50 year career.

 

The title of the film and the way it is presented on screen conflicts with the majestic view of the city and the gathering of the crowd to hear the upper class official tout the new plan for clean river water. That already establishes a sense of unease against the background of the very British sounding score. The black smoke from the ship crossing the water and the nude dead woman face down in the water let you know that more is needed than a government plan to clean up “the waste products of our society”. There is obviously pollution in the underbelly of the city that will dominate this movie. Hitchcock likes to make the viewer uneasy, but intrigued, from the outset of his films.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. In The Lodger, we are directly introduced to a scene of a young girl screaming in fear accompanied with a scary intense tone of music. In Frenzy, we are introduced in such a "traveling" way. It starts off with a pan shot of the Thames River, Then the shot gets closer to the crowd gathering and listening to the speaker who talks about getting rid of waste and toxic in the river, so in the Lodger we are introduced with fear and uncertainty, but in Frenzy we were introduced to the place where the murder happened. Another difference is how the victims were introduced. In Frenzy, a naked girl was floating deadly in the river, but in the Lodger we were shown a picture of the girl screaming in fear which emphasizes and triggers the feeling of fear and uncertainty a lot more.

 

2. The scene is in an open public space. There's a pan shot of the Thames River.  We are introduced to a murder case mysteriously without any warning. Lastly, Hitchcock's sense of humor and sarcasm cam be seen. In the scene, the speaker was talking about how to get rid of toxic and stop littering and polluting the river with dirty things. Then, the body of the dead woman appear.

 

3. We are introduced into various point of views in Frenzy's opening scene, a pan shot introduced us to the environment that the center of action occurs. We are immediately thrown into action without any warning which makes it a whole lot more interesting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1.How does the opening of Frenzy differ from the opening of The Lodger? Feel free to rewatch the clip from The Lodger (Daily Dose #2) for comparison. 

The difference between the two films is  The Lodger opens with a woman screaming after the credits.  Frenzy opens with an aerial shot of London and a gathering of individuals listening to a person discussing the environment when there is a discovery of a women's body.

 

2. What are some of the common Hitchcock touches that you see in this opening scene? Be specific.

 

Hitchcock makes a cameo appearance, this time among the crowd and the turning of the heads of the crowd one by one toward the water.

 

3. Using Frenzy as an example, what thoughts do you have about the various purposes Hitchcock had in mind when he created his opening scenes? In the Daily Doses, we have focused on opening scenes, so there should be patterns or strategies you have noticed over the course of opening scenes spanning Hitchcock's 50 year career.

 

Hitchcock uses the technique of build audience suspense

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does the opening of Frenzy differ from the opening of The Lodger? Feel free to rewatch the clip from The Lodger (Daily Dose #2) for comparison. The long slow POV shot of the opening in Frenzy flows smoothly from the long track along the Thames River and through the Tower Bridge, immediately establishing the setting in London (the opening 'London' graphic is almost unnecessary) with music building to a grand crescendo above, and softening as the camera lowers the audience toward the speaker and crowd, almost lulling the audience into a false sense of security (the white birds fluttering softly along the riverbank are a nice touch!).  In contrast, the opening in Lodger is more jarring and sudden, cutting from opening credits immediately to the scream closeup.  The comparison shows how Hitchcock's style becomes more polished visually over time, with access to advancements in technology, from 1927 to 1972, and the master's willingness to experiment to bring him to a far different opening approach for a similar 'Jack the Ripper' story. 

2. What are some of the common Hitchcock touches that you see in this opening scene? Be specific.  The opening theme music in Frenzy is lush and evocative, alternating from soothing to thrilling and grand.  Interestingly, I have read where Henry Mancini was the original composer for the film, but Hitch was furious at hearing the first recordings, saying it was 'too much like Herrmann'.  I hear, however, certain aspects of Herrmann's style in this score -- full orchestration with a generous lacing of harp underneath.  Again, we see a long POV opening shot (e.g., Rear Window, Psycho), a crowd in a public place (The Lodger, North by Northwest) and later in the opening of Frenzy, the use of dark humor (also present in the opening of Lodger).  As disturbing as some of the scenes are in Frenzy are, I think it is one of Hitchcock's funniest movies!

3. Using Frenzy as an example, what thoughts do you have about the various purposes Hitchcock had in mind when he created his opening scenes? In the Daily Doses, we have focused on opening scenes, so there should be patterns or strategies you have noticed over the course of opening scenes spanning Hitchcock's 50 year career. I've alluded to some of the similarities in response to question 2.  As I think more over the openings we have analyzed so far in the course, one common element I see in the first few minutes of most Hitchcock films is the immediate establishment of location.  We have learned that Hitchcock was fascinated by places and maps, and most of his films visually situate the audience to where they are in the story right off the bat.  Examples: Strangers on a Train ( the capitol building establishing the start in Washington, DC), To Catch a Thief (travel posters for France and the Riviera), Vertigo (San Francisco bay in the background, with the iconic bridges), North by Northwest (the BRILLIANT establishment of a mid-century modern skyscraper facade by Saul Bass in the opening credits, immediately suggesting New York City), Psycho (the location "Phoenix" actually displayed over shots of the skyline with date and time), The Birds (the pan following Tippi Hedren across a travel poster of San Francisco, transitioning from location to studio shot) to name a few.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does the opening of Frenzy differ from the opening of The Lodger? Feel free to rewatch the clip from The Lodger (Daily Dose #2) for comparison.  There are so many differences.  There is an immediate sense of danger and urgency (frenzy, even) in the opening of “The Lodger”, beginning with the scream, the flashing neon sign, the horror on the crowd faces, news spreading like wildfire.  The opening scene takes place at night, so there is an underworld feel about it.  By contrast, the opening of “Frenzy” is almost serene.  The orchestral soundtrack is soaring and majestic. It’s a daytime shot, the sky is blue and the view from above of London is lovely.  There is a nice pan down the River Thames, then the scene of a political rally by the river and then a not-too-shocked yell of “look, there’s a woman in the river.”  No screams, no shock, no news spreading like wildfire.  A very interesting start for a movie called “Frenzy.”  Quite the juxtaposition.

2. What are some of the common Hitchcock touches that you see in this opening scene? Be specific.  The long tracking shot from a distance into the opening setting.  Also, the public setting and the viewer being placed in the center of the action.   

3. Using Frenzy as an example, what thoughts do you have about the various purposes Hitchcock had in mind when he created his opening scenes? In the Daily Doses, we have focused on opening scenes, so there should be patterns or strategies you have noticed over the course of opening scenes spanning Hitchcock's 50 year career.  As a general statement, Hitchcock’s consistent goal is clearly to set the tone of the movie in in the opening minutes with the use of title sequences (as in “Vertigo”, “Psycho”, “North by Northwest”), the choice of music, tracking and POV shots, strong visuals (“The Lodger”, “The Pleasure Garden”), focus on particular items and putting the viewer in the middle of the action.  The audience is shown right away that something is amiss (Marnie’s character change, dead body in “The Lodger” and in “Frenzy”, crazy birds…).  In “Frenzy” specifically, Hitchcock again uses a long tracking shot to pull the audience into the scene.  He uses the juxtaposition of a jarring title graphic with happy, almost regal orchestral music which puts the audience off-balance (the audience now knows something is amiss).  Within a couple of minutes, crowd spots the body in the river, clearly a violent murder.  The stage is set.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Lodger’s opening depicts a woman who is affright, a signature example of German Expressionism utilized by Hitchcock in his early filmmaking days. This film also drops the audience with immediacy into the plot; we have a criminal act, a witness and now an active investigation. Frenzy eases us into its narrative with a lengthy opening, topping three minutes plus, before there is any discovery of a crime. Hitchcock likely began with the ease in effect due to this film’s obscenely depictions of violence (rape and murder.) It's as though he was merciful to his audience, which he did not afford to his female characters.

 

The opening shot of Frenzy is classic Hitchcock. The lingering camera’s tracking shot of London is reminiscent of the opening shots of both Phoenix in Psycho, and Jefferies’ courtyard in Rear Window. Hitchcock is quick in establishing​ the settings of his artistic narratives allowing the camera to capture imagery conveying information with words (at times) left unspoken.

 

Hitchcock, I believe, connects his films intentionally. They are all interwoven by his signature style, his artistic touch. Hitchcock’s conscious efforts of denoting his storytelling in ways of intricacy and attention to detail exhibit an artist true to his work. This, along with his natural genius, are staple examples as to why and how Hitchcock is, was, and always will be not only The Master of Suspense, but A Master of the artistic medium of filmmaking.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How does the opening of Frenzy differ from the opening of The Lodger? Feel free to rewatch the clip from The Lodger (Daily Dose #2) for comparison. 

The Lodger opens at night with a scream filled with horror, everyone is distraught and surprised. Frenzy opens during the day with a lazy aerial shot of London. There are no screams of horror even when the woman is found dead in the Thames, it's almost expected.

 

What are some of the common Hitchcock touches that you see in this opening scene? Be specific.

The opening is reminiscent of the Rear Window where you get a bird's eye view of the neighborhood. The viewer cannot see into windows but this seems like a slow pan of London, it looks so peaceful from up there. Hitchcock uses tongue-in-cheek humor as the character explains how the Thames will be cleaned and scrubbed as we see a dead woman floating to where they are. How many other people or things will they find while cleaning? Hitchcock also makes a cameo in the opening scene.

 

 

Using Frenzy as an example, what thoughts do you have about the various purposes Hitchcock had in mind when he created his opening scenes? In the Daily Doses, we have focused on opening scenes, so there should be patterns or strategies you have noticed over the course of opening scenes spanning Hitchcock's 50 year career.

Hitchcock likes to show us the result in the first couple scenes, then we built up to how it happened and why. He uses camera techniques that make the viewer comfortable in most cases. In Frenzy he uses a POV shot of London we look about and see it's nice, then we get hot with a murder. In Rear Window he see a POV of the neighborhood, it's a nice neighborhood but in this case we feel naughty looking into their private spaces.

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1.    How does the opening of Frenzy differ from the opening of The Lodger? Feel free to rewatch the clip from The Lodger (Daily Dose #2) for comparison. 

The Lodger starts with the woman screaming, followed by the sign “To – Night Golden Curls” and then the body with the witness giving her report to the policeman, surrounded by the crowd.  In Frenzy, it is the direct opposite with the trip down the Themes and then the crowd listening to the speaker and then the body floating in the water. At that point the crowd moves to look at the body in the river.  The Lodger also goes into much more detail regarding the reporter calling in his report, the teletype machine, and the newspaper being published.  Frenzy stays away from all of that.

2. What are some of the common Hitchcock touches that you see in this opening scene? Be specific.

The POV shot as the boat travels down the Thames, the audience sees what the pilot sees. The same happens as the shot changes to the sky shot and moves to the crowd and the speaker.  In addition, we see Alfred Hitchcock in the crowd, thus ensuring his cameo appearance.  While the speaker is continuing about the river, a man suddenly sees something in the river and yells out, turning our focus to the river and what is floating there.

3. Using Frenzy as an example, what thoughts do you have about the various purposes Hitchcock had in mind when he created his opening scenes? In the Daily Doses, we have focused on opening scenes, so there should be patterns or strategies you have noticed over the course of opening scenes spanning Hitchcock's 50 year career. 

It starts out as a calm, serene boat trip down the Thames as the musical theme is light, airy, and majestic, like the river, not giving a hint of what is to come, or be found, in the calm, tranquil water.  The shot then changes as the camera moves in from the sky to center on the crowd and the politician discussing the river. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1. How does the opening of Frenzy differ from the opening of The Lodger? Feel free to rewatch the clip from The Lodger (Daily Dose #2) for comparison. 

 

Well, the most obvious difference is that Frenzy is filmed in color as opposed to The Lodger being in black and white.

 

The Lodger’s opening begins in the single location set on a street Frenzy begins with an arial shot, flying down the Thames River allowing a leisurely view of London and the films titles. 

 

As others have pointed out, The Lodger begins with a woman screaming followed by cards repeating the words To-Night “Golden Curls” four times, then proceeds to immediately show a covered body and the reaction of a bystander. In contrast Frenzy begins with a politician delivering an obvious government promoting speech concerning restoration efforts reclaiming the Thames. This speech goes on for a bit before an uninterested man in the crowd looking in the opposite direction of the crowd spots a body. 

 

In The Lodger beginning a woman screams, followed by a policeman taking her statement then proceeds to a crowd full of people reacting. In Frenzy a man’s shout only draws the interest of a single woman at first. When she proclaims “what is it?” a third person turns to declare “it’s a woman.”, at which point a fourth person turns and then the crowd collectively turns to see what the fuss is about.

 

The victims body in The Lodger is shown covered lying with face pointed upwards in the street; in Frenzy the victims body is completely nude, floating in the Thames face down.

 

 

Generally Hitchcock’s cameos consist of him doing some sort of activity before the camera bare headed (not always, but generally.) In Frenzy he stands motionless, wearing a bowler.

 

Opening music of The Lodger is emphatic, adding urgency and intensity to a frightening scene almost immediately. Frenzy opens with music that might very well be used as guests are announced at a royal ball. It goes on laconically as the titles are shown, ending in a ordinary and obvious political event, non-threatening to the point of boredom.

 

The Lodger opens with an illustration in the German Expressionist tradition showing a shadowy figure; while Frenzy opens with the a “real” presentation of a flight over the Thames and a coat of arms.

 

2. What are some of the common Hitchcock touches that you see in this opening scene? Be specific.

 

Public place and tourist landmarks

Lodger - opens on bridge near Thames

Frenzy - opens with flight over Thames showing Parliament, London Bridge

 

Crowd as a witness and reaction

Lodger - crowd witnesses interview of bystander

Frenzy - crowd attending political event that is interrupted with bystanders reaction

 

Murderer proclaims his identity without giving his real identity away

Lodger - murderer leaves note with emblem and words The Avenger

Frenzy - necktie around neck of victim, hallmark of the necktie strangler

 

Woman victim:

Lodger - woman lying in street

Frenzy - woman floating in river

 

Media methods of production:

Lodger - entire process from single reporter to news papers being distributed.

Frenzy - video news crew filming and possibly broadcasting event

(If Frenzy was made today it would be the crowd using cell phones and posting footage to YouTube, Facebook, Pinterest, etc.)

 

Hitchcock mirror (in reverse) referencing previous beginnings of his movies. See question 1. Hitchcock was coreograhping in reverse the openings of what he considered his first British success to what he may have well known would be his last British movie.

 

3. Using Frenzy as an example, what thoughts do you have about the various purposes Hitchcock had in mind when he created his opening scenes? In the Daily Doses, we have focused on opening scenes, so there should be patterns or strategies you have noticed over the course of opening scenes spanning Hitchcock's 50 year career.

 

In Frenzy Hitchcock probably realized the helicopter dolly he wanted for Psycho. Opening with a distant shot of a city, then moving in closer and closer emphasizing to the viewer that he is drawing them in closer and closer to focusing on what will follow. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1.  How does the opening of Frenzy differ from the The Lodger.

 

Aside from silent movie versus modern color movie, The Lodger opens with a woman screaming and then dead on the ground.  A crowd has gathered by the river because of the murder and police are speaking with people at the scene taking statements.  The Lodger portrays the fear and panic of the people upon discovering the murdered woman. 

 

Frenzy opens quite peacefully with uplifting music and a beautiful aerial view of London.  The camera pans in on a crowd (also by the river) listening to a seemingly long-winded politician with perfect diction.  A man at the edge of the crowd, closest to the river's edge draws attention to a body floating in the river.  One by one people turn to notice the partially clothed woman's body floating by.

 

The crowd in The Lodgers gathers because of the murder and in Frenzy, the crowd is gathered for something else entirely and oh - by the way, there's a body floating in the river. 

 

2.  Common Hitchcock touches in the opening scene.

 

A panoramic view of a public place, famous landmarks in the scene.  The cameo appearance of Hitchcock of course, but this time (as in other later movies of his), he is easy to spot and stands out in the crowd - this time as the only man wearing a hat and is stark still in contrast to other people around him all moving in some fashion.

 

With the people standing nearest the river's edge beginning with the man who first notices the woman's body floating in the river - each subsequent person turns around one at a time as if they are noticing this in slow motion.  It reminded me of the scene in The Birds where Tippi Hedren is in the restaurant with the others.  As she stands there, mouth gaping in horror, the camera cuts from her face then to the destruction caused by the birds then back to her face again.  Each time, her face has moved and looking at a different scene but her reaction is captured frame by frame.

 

3.  What did Hitchcock have in mind with his opening scenes?

 

To engage his audience from the start of the film.  Some films begin slowly and can be a bit boring until they get going or you figure out what's going on.  I don't find Hitchcock films to be that way.  Whether it begins with a close-up of a woman's face in a silent film, or a large grand view of a beautiful city or landscape - or even slowly coming upon an open window of someone's apartment as in Rear Window where we feel as though we're eavesdropping - it grabs your attention right away. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does the opening of Frenzy differ from the opening of The Lodger? Feel free to rewatch the clip from The Lodger (Daily Dose #2) for comparison.   The opening of this film is much more grand with the london skyline its also saying "Hitchcock Returns to London"

2. What are some of the common Hitchcock touches that you see in this opening scene? Be specific.   The opening credits with music and landscape makes the opening grand and almost epic in away. We are also seeing what is in the rivers of london before the real scene begins.  And we can see where the scene begins where a large crowd has gathered to proclaim that the rivers will be for all for who enjoys the sea and it will be free of waist and a women.....

3. Using Frenzy as an example, what thoughts do you have about the various purposes Hitchcock had in mind when he created his opening scenes? In the Daily Doses, we have focused on opening scenes, so there should be patterns or strategies you have noticed over the course of opening scenes spanning Hitchcock's 50 year career.

I do not want to repeat my self but this opening begins with yet another large crowd of people as what he did back in the london days of filmmaking.  If Hitchcock would be alive today i am sure the "marketing dept." would call it an "Alfred Hitchcock Universe" so if you look at it from those standards of today The Lodger and Frenzy are connected in more then one way or another, the murderer, the victims, the jack the ripper storyline and London as a character of the film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Frenzy opening is a very long shot of London that takes the audience to the scene of a political speech about cleaning up the Thames River which is wonderful humor from Hitchcock as the river has been polluted with a dead woman as found after several people observe and exclaim it is a woman. In the Lodger, the scene is different because it begins with a close up of a woman screaming after seeing a dead woman. The music in Frenzy is very British and appropriate to the setting of a political speech. The music in The Lodger sets the stage for terror and fear very different from Frenzy.

 

Some common Hitchcock touches include the humor as the speech is about pollution in the Thames River and then a body washes up on the shore in front of the crowd. The long panoramic opening has been seen a few times before Frenzy followed by close ups of the crowd. A large crowd is a reoccurring scene for Hitchcock. And there he is in the crowd, always a cameo.

 

When Hitchcock created the opening scenes I think he wanted to jump in quickly to give us as much information as we can to get us hooked. In Frenzy we know where we are, London, we know a woman has been thrown naked and dead into the Thames river. And we don't have to look any further for the director as he has appeared in the opening scene.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The opening scenes of Frenzy and The Lodger involve the same dramatic event; the public discovery of a dead body. However, Hitchcock deals with the subject differently in these two opening scenes. In The Lodger, we first see a close up of a woman, open mouthed, screaming in terror. This is followed by a shot of the body, and a woman who witnessed the murder telling the police what she saw. In contrast, Frenzy begins with a very long aerial shot of London. The discovery of the body is delayed, as we see a crowd gathered by the river listening to a political speech about pollution. While The Lodger, as a silent film, depicts the information visually with the witness pointing, in Frenzy we get an actual shout of Look!

The body floating in the river is just as disturbing, but through different cinematic means. In The Lodger, there is terror from the very first shot. Here, the sight of the body is surprising and unexpected given that we have just been watching a fairly normal scene. In both films, Hitchcock maximizes our feelings of shock and horror.

 

It seems that location is very important to Hitchcock when creating opening scenes. For example, in the opening of Frenzy, the location of London is emphasized through the long aerial shot. Many of his films also begin with crowds, whether, as in Frenzy, they are listening to a speech, or, as in other films, they are attending a performance or sporting event. I feel that Hitchcock saw these moments as the optimum time to reveal something horrific or shocking. Maybe the reason is because we all have experience as part of such crowds or audiences. Therefore, we can easily picture ourselves being caught up in such a scene. Finally, I feel Hitchcock used his opening scenes to "hook" or grab the audience. They often evoke strong feelings of suspicion, shock, or intrigue. For example, the appearance of a body is a common occurrence in Hitchcock's openings. We are immediately invested in the story and want to find out more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. How does the opening of Frenzy differ from the opening of The Lodger? Feel free to rewatch the clip from The Lodger (Daily Dose #2) for comparison.

 

I see more similarities than I see differences, but anyway, The Lodger opens with the screaming girl, and then opens up to the crowd, and then wider into the city and the media. Frenzy opens up with the city, the crowd, and then closes up on the already murdered girl.

 

The similarities, I think Dr. Edwards and W.G. discussed. The murder of a blonde girl at the River Thames in London, crowd finds the body, and discover the killer's trademark (the "Avenger" note, the necktie).

 

2. What are some of the common Hitchcock touches that you see in this opening scene? Be specific.

 

Combines the opening of an "aerial" pan of a place (like Rebecca, The Lady Vanishes, Rear Window, Psycho, etc.) and then closes in on a crowd, like most of the opening scenes we've discussed. His cameo, as part of the crowd, is another noticeable touch. A murder occurring, and the murdered girl is a blonde. The man who spots the body yells "Look!", prompting the crowd to look (the voyeuristic side), and everybody looks at the naked corpse without nobody really jumping to see if she's indeed dead.

 

3. Using Frenzy as an example, what thoughts do you have about the various purposes Hitchcock had in mind when he created his opening scenes? In the Daily Doses, we have focused on opening scenes, so there should be patterns or strategies you have noticed over the course of opening scenes spanning Hitchcock's 50 year career.

 

I think Hitchcock's usual intention is to put is right there in the action, in the middle of the crowd or the scene. In The Lodger, we were right there at the riverbanks with the crowd; in The 39 Steps, we are in the crowd watching Mr. Memory; in Rear Window, we are inside Jeff's apartment; in Vertigo, we are right in the middle of the chase. Here in Frenzy, we are with the crowd when the body is discovered.

 

He also tends to put us in a subjective point of view from the beginning. As the crowd focuses on the necktie, the scene cuts to Blaney putting on a tie. So even though Hitchcock let us know pretty soon that Bob Rusk is the killer, he still dares to put us in the subjective point of view that the people on the city will have, thinking that Blaney is the killer.

 

In similar ways, he had us inside Mrs. De Winter's mind as Rebecca started, or watching that cop fall from Scottie's POV in Vertigo, etc. because he wants us to experience what the characters are experiencing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Frenzy ends the circle begun with The Lodger... In both a killer of women, a false culprit...

But in my opinion, the beginning of Frenzy is different to The Lodger. Here, as a tribute to its origins, the protagonist is also the city of London. The corpse is discovered to daylight and in a public place. Irony is the contrast between the speech of the politician on the cleaning of the River, and the corpse in the water. On the other hand, in The Lodger, the reaction of the people meant fear. In Frenzy, people do not seem to show horror but curiosity. Perhaps, this is also a concession of the great director to the new style in the films of the 70's, where the public had already used to seeing corpses.

A common element to other early is the camera that goes from general to focus on a particular place. Hitchcock, from the home puts us in the scene of crime, or of the place where the story goes.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. It's similar, yet different, yes there's a murder, but with Lodger, it's frantic and fresh, we go from a very recent murder and the ensuing panic, to a more sedate focus on a mundane event, that is interrupted by the curious arrival of a murder victim. Before that takes place, the long tracking shot seems like a majestic homecoming for the Director himself, I'm back London, and look what I can do now. It's very grand in gesture, the bridge is welcoming him with open arms, the music is very British and very proper, it all seems like a grand gesture to say I'm rounding the bend, and I haven't forgotten my roots.

2. The tracking shot being the most obvious, but equally so, the cameo. The London pomp and circumstance, even the City of London logo, all harken back to a great beginning (to his career) that he is effortlessly connecting to this great finish. I have always liked Frenzy, it's fresh, maybe not entirely Hitch, but good fun, and kind of a modern culmination of a significantly historic career.

3. He almost always introduces us to a main character, to which we will soon be relating to, if not a specific person, at the very least, the story. He gives us so much information in such a small package, so we can say, I get it, now let me watch it unfold. Similar to the television series Columbo, here's the murder and the murderer up front, so we don't have to spend a lot of time working that out, and now we can sit back and enjoy the process, getting to know the characters, the rest of the story, learning our connection to them, and how we will feel about them as we go along. It's a very simple way of telling a wonderfully complex story that's often overlooked these days. I can't say it enough, so much with so little, yet always enough, much like the perfect meal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How does the opening of Frenzy differ from the opening of The Lodger? Feel free to rewatch the clip from The Lodger (Daily Dose #2) for comparison. 


In the Lodger, the very first image is of the woman screaming and being strangled. We get to the action immediately there and in this scene from Frenzy, it takes us a few minutes to get to it. Hitchcock takes more time to set the scene here. In the Lodger, the typewriter serves as a way to convey the information that there is a serial killer on the loose. This opening scene clip doesn't give us any information about the woman in the river.


What are some of the common Hitchcock touches that you see in this opening scene? Be specific.


Use of landmarks/famous places -- London Bridge in this case. The way the drawbridge is raised for the camera to pass through reminds me of going through the window into the courtyard in Rear Window and perhaps even through the hotel window into the room in Psycho. The music feels like more of a return to earlier scores. It's not the edgy Bernard Herrmann-type score. The dark Hitchcock humor is there ... the politician is making a speech about how soon the water is going to be clear of industrial waste and then a moment later a dead body is found floating face down in the water. When everyone started to turn their attention away from the politician, it reminded me a bit of the tennis match that everyone except Robert Walker/Bruno Antony is watching in Strangers on a Train. The cameo, of course.


Using Frenzy as an example, what thoughts do you have about the various purposes Hitchcock had in mind when he created his opening scenes? In the Daily Doses, we have focused on opening scenes, so there should be patterns or strategies you have noticed over the course of opening scenes spanning Hitchcock's 50 year career.


As a visual artist, Hitchcock was able to give us images that were often more informative and more moving that any dialogue might have been. Sometimes the most important purpose to Hitchcock was introducing a character (Rear Window, Marnie, Vertigo) and other times it seems it was more vital for him to set the scene. In Frenzy, I think he's setting the scene. The music is very traditional, the postcard-type opening shot. We enter the action through the drawbridge and we see a gathering around a politician. The sight of the woman in the water is a direct contradiction of the politician's words. That seems meaningful. 


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How does the opening of Frenzy differ from the opening of The Lodger? Feel free to rewatch the clip from The Lodger (Daily Dose #2) for comparison. 

The Lodger begins with a woman scream and the murder, then exposition, and the city in response, the media responding.  This begins with a long aerial shot of the river with city framing the shot and then discovery of the body.  In short, there isn't any response yet for murder.  The music is more regal, a contrast with scores from movies like Psycho, Vertigo.

 

What are some of the common Hitchcock touches that you see in this opening scene? Be specific.

The crowd watching.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us