Dr. Rich Edwards

Questions for Alexandre Philippe for August 1st Shindig

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Hi #Hitchcock50 Students,

 

Prof. Edwards will be interviewing Alexandre Philippe live on the web via Shindig on August 1, 2017 at 1pm Eastern / 10am Pacific.

 

We will devote some time to answering your mail bag questions - so post your questions here and we will pick a handful to answer during our live session!

 

Shindig is a new web video website and you can get your link to our live conversation by RSVP'ing here: https://gateway.shindig.com/event/bsu-hitchcock

 

If you can't make the live web broadcast, we will post the video through a link in Canvas for everyone to watch at a later time!

 

You do not have to be RSVP'd to ask a question - so ask away! Happy to try to answer any/all Hitchcock related questions!!

 

See you next Tuesday, August 1!

 

 

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My question for Prof. Edwards and Mr. Philippe:

 

Which of the typically neglected and/or overlooked Hitchcock films would you recommend for reconsideration by an audience? Is there one particular film more than any other that you feel deserves a second chance?

 

- Chris Coombs

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We know Truffaut's feelings about Hitchcock, but how did Hitchcock feel about Truffaut and about French New Wave in general?  

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Is there one aspect of Hitchcock's filmmaking that you feel he doesn't get enough credit or acknowledgment for?

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My local library will be showing Hitchcock films on three consecutive Thursdays at the end of this month (August). I chose the three titles: The Birds, Rear Window, and Psycho. These three seem like obvious (and safe) choices.

 

If we draw a solid audience, I'd like to show others in the coming months. With a general audience in mind, would you recommend a couple of Hitchcock's less well-known films?

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What actors who are popular today would be considered the "type" Hitchcock would choose for his starring roles?  

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Hitchcock once defined the MacGuffin as “the thing that the spies are after but the audience don’t care about.”   Is there a MacGuffin in every Hitchcock film?  For example, does Marnie have a MacGuffin? 

 
 

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I thought I asked why Mr. Hitchcock never won a Best Director oscar despite Rebecca winning best

picture.

 

However...

 

Why did he remake The Man Who Knew Too Much? (When in my opinion the original was so much better.)

Do you imagine, if he could remake something else, what might that be?

 

Thank you for your consideration.

 

Joan Tarshis

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What challenged you the most as a Director in turning the iconic "shower scene" into the basis for the documentary "78/52" and when will we be able to see it? 

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Which of Hitchcock's films adapt best to viewing on television or other electronics? Which do you think most require viewing in a theatre?

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My question is: Why do you think Hitchcock detested method actors? Was it a question of control or lack of control? I'd enjoy some specifics. Thanks.

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Hitchcock once defined the MacGuffin as “the thing that the spies are after but the audience don’t care about.”   Is there a MacGuffin in every Hitchcock film?  For example, does [/size]Marnie have a MacGuffin? [/size]

 

 

It might be a Scottish name, taken from a story about two men in a train. One man says, 'What's that package up there in the baggage rack?' And the other answers, 'Oh that's a McGuffin.' The first one asks 'What's a McGuffin?' 'Well' the other man says, 'It's an apparatus for trapping lions in the Scottish Highlands.' The first man says, 'But there are no lions in the Scottish Highlands,' and the other one answers 'Well, then that's no McGuffin!' So you see, a McGuffin is nothing at all.

(Alfred Hitchcock, 1966 interview with François Truffaut)

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Hitchcock is probably the most famous movie director in film history (who else could compare as a cultural icon? Orson Welles? Steven Spielberg?). What aspects of Hitchcock and his body of work do you think have resonated so strongly with both film critics and with the public at large?

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The women characters in Hitchcock films (and television shows) were mostly portrayed as weaker physically and emotionally than the men characters although a female might be more cunning than the male counterpart.  Even in an argument between a Hitchcock male and female (Grace Kelly and James Steward in Rear Window), the man almost always has the last word.  This was the societal view of women through the 1960s and early 1970s.  Would Hitchcock have ever considered a strong female character such as Ripley in the Alien franchise?  Are there any Hitchcock female characters that might be considered pre-Ripley?   

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All through his career, Hitchcock and his production teams have always been at the leading edge of creative techniques and performance ability,

 

... but has there ever been a shot, scene, stunt, (or even a movie) that Hitch just could not accomplish, because it was deemed too technically complicated, risky, dangerous, expensive, or just impractical give the current limits of time, budget, technology, or expertice being unavailable or impractical? 

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Hello Prof. Edwards and Mr Philippe

Your insight is amazing thanks to both of you.

 

My first question is for Mr Philippe

 

What other works of Hitchcock's legacy do find interesting enough to make another possible documentary and in short how would you describe your journey in getting to know the Hitchcock style, has it influenced your personal goals as a director?

 

My second question is for both of you

 

We've only touched the tip of the iceberg of Hitchcock's legacy in this class. What suggestions do you have in continuing and deeping our knowledge and understanding of his amazing career as a director? Where would I start, as there is so much information?

 

Thank you,

Darcy

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I have another question

 

I came across a Bernstein project in which Hitchcock flew to England to be part of, a film on German concentration camps which was shut down and Wilder made instead? Could you clarify the 1945 film and what ultimately became of this project? Are there more films Hitchcock has been part less known to the public and are they obtainable?

 

Thanks for sharing your insight,

 

Darcy

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In VERTIGO, why is the manager of the McKittrick Hotel (Ellen Corby) insistent that "Carlotta Valdez" hasn't been at the hotel that day? We have just seen "Madeleine/Judy" opening the shade in the room above the lobby. Or have we only seen her there through Scottie's eyes? Through his...imagination? In which case, is she there...or not?

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I was wondering if you would be willing to share your thoughts on what seems to be a recurring Hitchcock theme of the dynamic of male/female relationships, roles, and expectations in his films.  Is there a hint of misogyny in his films (as was noted in our class discussion of the noir genre), is it a reflection on how Hitchcock himself felt about marriage and women (which does not seem logical considering his long marriage to Alma), or do these recurring situations in his films simply reflect societal beliefs and expectations from each of the time periods when the films were released (with women being objectified in films dating back to The Pleasure Garden and continuing up through Rear Window)? And finally, how should the audience reconcile these ideas with the equally strong and independent women that also appear in some of his films?  

 

Thank you,

 

Mr. Loren Santiago

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One other question, which of course is merely speculation:

 

If Hitchcock were still alive and making films today, do you think he would remain true to himself as a film maker, or do you think he would feel pressured to resort to the cliched and bad film techniques that audiences expect today because of a shorter attention span and a need for non-stop action and violence?  I realize that Hitchcock would always "reinvent" himself his entire career, always pushing the envelope while still including his signature touches in each of his films.  Personally, I would like to think that Hitchcock would NOT feel the pressure to cater to today's average viewers who do not have the patience to listen to Hitchcock's beautiful dialogue, appreciate his character development, and admire all of the pain-staking detail he put into each of his films.

 

Thank you again,

 

Mr. Loren Santiago

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How deep was Hitchcock's level of interest in the work of Freud, Jung and psychoanalysis in general?  Did he read their works and consult with experts? Or was it just fashionable psychobabble?   Watching Marnie so close to Vertigo really hits home that he had an interest in the theories and vocabulary of the field, as does also his comment on the subliminal effects of music and color.

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Mr. Phillppe,

 

1. Would you every consider making a feature film? If so, what genre would be your favorite choice?

 

2. If you could remake any Hitchcock movie, which would it be and how would you adapt it for a modern audience?

 

Thanks,

Lucinda

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I have another question

 

I came across a Bernstein project in which Hitchcock flew to England to be part of, a film on German concentration camps which was shut down and Wilder made instead? Could you clarify the 1945 film and what ultimately became of this project? Are there more films Hitchcock has been part less known to the public and are they obtainable?

 

Thanks for sharing your insight,

 

Darcy

I hope Mr. Philippe won't mind, but I can answer this one, at least to a certain extent. Britain and the US were to collaborate on the project, except the collaboration fell apart and both countries used some of the same footage to make their own distinct variants. The American version, Death Mills, was helmed by Billy Wilder and was released in 1946. The British version was shelved for decades, not being fully (mostly) restored and released until 2014. Much of the footage had been previously released as Memory of the Camps, but the latest, most complete version is entitled German Concentration Camps Factual Survey.

 

IMDb claims both Bernstein and Hitchcock directed, although the print itself does not credit a director, Hitch being credited as treatment adviser.

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I hope Mr. Philippe won't mind, but I can answer this one, at least to a certain extent. Britain and the US were to collaborate on the project, except the collaboration fell apart and both countries used some of the same footage to make their own distinct variants. The American version, Death Mills, was helmed by Billy Wilder and was released in 1946. The British version was shelved for decades, not being fully (mostly) restored and released until 2014. Much of the footage had been previously released as Memory of the Camps, but the latest, most complete version is entitled German Concentration Camps Factual Survey.

 

IMDb claims both Bernstein and Hitchcock directed, although the print itself does not credit a director, Hitch being credited as treatment adviser.

 

It has been released on blu-ray this April.

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Hello:  My question is for Mr. Phillipe and Professor Edwards.  Alfred Hitchcock has said that german expressionism was a great influence, if not the greatest inflence on his work.  Which one of his movies best exemplifies the influence of german expressionism?  Thank you!

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